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Azithromycin Blood Sugar Levels

Azithromycin (zithromax): An Antibiotic For Bacterial Infections

Azithromycin (zithromax): An Antibiotic For Bacterial Infections

Getty ImagesWLADIMIR BULGAR/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Azithromycin is an antibiotic used to treat various types of bacterial infections, including chest infections such as pneumonia and bronchitis , ear nose and throat infections such as sinusitis , tonsillitis and otitis media and infections of skin and soft tissue. It's also prescribed to treat Lyme disease and some sexually-transmitted infections, particularly chlamydia and gonorrhoea . A single dose of azithromycin (brand name Clamelle ) can be bought over the counter from pharmacies to treat chlamydia. Azithromycin has a similar range of antibacterial activity to penicillin and so is sometimes used as an alternative to penicillin in people who are allergic to penicillin antibiotics. To make sure the bacteria causing an infection are susceptible to azithromycin your doctor may take a tissue sample, for example a swab from the throat or skin. Azithromycin is a type of antibiotic called a macrolide. It works by preventing bacteria from producing proteins that are essential to them. Without these proteins the bacteria cannot grow, replicate and increase in numbers. The bacteria eventually die or are destroyed by the immune system. This clears up the infection. Azithromycin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic that helps clear up infections caused by a wide variety of bacteria. People who are allergic to other macrolide or ketolide type antibiotics, eg erythromycin, clarithromycin. Make sure your doctor knows if you've ever had an allergic reaction to an antibiotic. People who are allergic to any ingredients of the medicine. Check the ingredients listed in the leaflet that comes with your medicine if you know you have specific allergies. Some people might need a lower azithromycin dose or extra monitoring. Make sure your doctor Continue reading >>

Certain Antibiotics Tied To Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

Certain Antibiotics Tied To Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

THURSDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes patients who take a certain class of antibiotics are more likely to have severe blood sugar fluctuations than those who take other types of the drugs, a new study finds. The increased risk was low but doctors should consider it when prescribing the class of antibiotics, known as fluoroquinolones, to people with diabetes, the researchers said. This class of antibiotics, which includes drugs such as Cipro (ciprofloxacin), Levaquin (levofloxacin) and Avelox (moxifloxacin), is commonly used to treat conditions such as urinary tract infections and community-acquired pneumonia. One expert said the study should serve as a wake-up call for doctors. "Given a number of alternatives, physicians may consider prescribing alternate antibiotics ... in the place of fluoroquinolones (particularly moxifloxacin) to patients with diabetes," said Dr. Christopher Ochner, assistant professor of pediatrics and adolescent medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. "In general, this study demonstrates that closer attention needs to be paid to particular drug-condition interactions." The study included about 78,000 people with diabetes in Taiwan. The researchers looked at the patients' use of three classes of antibiotics: fluoroquinolones; second-generation cephalosporins (cefuroxime, cefaclor, or cefprozil); or macrolides (clarithromycin or azithromycin). The investigators also looked for any emergency-room visits or hospitalizations for severe blood sugar swings among the patients in the 30 days after they started taking the antibiotics. The results showed that patients who took fluoroquinolones were more likely to have severe blood sugar swings than those who took antibiotics in the other classes. The level of risk Continue reading >>

Azithromycin Insulin Diet Intervention Trial In Type 1 Diabetes (aidit)

Azithromycin Insulin Diet Intervention Trial In Type 1 Diabetes (aidit)

Azithromycin Insulin Diet Intervention Trial in Type 1 Diabetes i) Azithromycin Monohydrate, three times a week ( 48 h between doses) during 52 weeks. 500 mg if body weight 30 kg, 250 mg if body weight < 30 kg. ii) Extra intensive insulin treatment periods for maximum beta-cell rest with Insulin lispro (Sanofi). This treatment will be given i.v. for one episode of 72 hours in the first week after inclusion and s.c. on seven 6-8 h occasions during the study year. The dose will be individually titrated to reach target blood glucose 4.00.5 mmol/L. ii) Dietician support; Extra advice and support from the study dietician within the first week after randomization and after 1.5 and 4 months. Azithromycin Monohydrate tablet (Azithromycin Sandoz) or oral suspension (Azithromax). Solution for intravenous or subcutaneous use Patients will receive treatment as usual (TAU). All patients will receive standard therapeutic treatment consisting of insulin replacement with insulin analogues aiming for normoglycemia from diagnosis. Rapid acting insulin analogue will be administered via insulin pump (continuous subcutaneous infusion) with access to insulin injections in case of malfunction in the pump system. Stimulated C-peptide during an MMTT [TimeFrame:12 months after inclusion] Residual insulin secretion measured by mixed meal tolerance test (MMTT) stimulated C-peptide two-hour under the curve profile measured one year after study inclusion. >60% of time in target blood glucose levels [TimeFrame:two weeks in the 12th month after initiation of the study treatment] Proportion of subjects with time in target 3.9-7.8 mmol/L 60% and with a glycaemic variability expressed as standard deviation < 2 mmol/L according to continuous glucose monitoring during two weeks in the 12th month after ini Continue reading >>

Certain Antibiotics Linked To Blood Glucose Swings

Certain Antibiotics Linked To Blood Glucose Swings

People with diabetes who take a certain class of antibiotics are more likely to experience severe swings in blood glucose, according to new research from Taiwan. Previous research and case reports have raised concern about the possibility of severe high and low blood glucose associated with the use of fluoroquinolones, a class of antibiotics that includes ciprofloxacin (brand name Cipro), levofloxacin (Levaquin), and moxifloxacin (Avelox). One drug in this class, gatifloxacin (Tequin), was removed from the US market due to the risk of blood glucose fluctuations. To assess the risk of severe blood glucose swings in people with diabetes taking these medicines, researchers looked at data from approximately 78,000 people in Taiwan. Specifically, they looked at the subjects’ use of three classes of antibiotics — fluoroquinolones, cephalosporins (cefuroxime [Ceftin, Zinacef], cefaclor [Ceclor], or cefprozil [Cefzil]), and macrolides (clarithromycin [Biaxin] or azithromycin [Zithromax, AzaSite, Zmax]) — along with their rates of emergency-room visits or hospitalizations for severe blood glucose swings in the 30 days after starting the antibiotics. Over the 23-month study period, hospital records indicated that 215 people had had severe high blood glucose while 425 had experienced severe low blood glucose. The researchers found that people who had taken fluoroquinolones were more likely to have developed severe blood glucose swings than those who had taken antibiotics from the other classes, with the risk varying according to which fluoroquinolone had been taken. Overall the risks of severe blood glucose swings were low, being observed in fewer than 1 of every 100 people studied, but the researchers suggest that health-care providers use caution when considering using flu Continue reading >>

Medicines That Raise Blood Sugar (bg) Levels - Dlife

Medicines That Raise Blood Sugar (bg) Levels - Dlife

Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. Its important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Dont ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Niacin is used to lower triglycerides and cholesterol. In higher doses, it can raise blood sugar. Niacin (Niaspan, Niacor, Slo-Niacin and various non-prescription products) Over-the-Counter(Non-Prescription) Medicines That May Affect Blood Sugar The most common offenders are in the class of medicines known as decongestants. Decongestants dont contain sugar, but cause the release of stored sugar into the bloodstream. They are used to reduce nasal congestion, often during cold season and allergy season. There are two decongestants available in the U.S. and one, pseudoephedrine, is usually kept behind the counter, to be sold only by a pharmacist. These decongestants are included in many multi-symptom products. Advil Cold and Sinus tablets (pseudoephedrine) The second category is products that actually contain sugar: most often cough syrups, cough drops, and lozenges. The extent of the effect on blood sugar relates Continue reading >>

Non-diabetes Drugs And Supplements That Affect Glucose Levels

Non-diabetes Drugs And Supplements That Affect Glucose Levels

(This is a partial list. Diabetes in Control has created a PDF of a more complete list, which you can find by clicking Each time you get a prescription for a new medication, try to read the info that comes with the medication or ask the pharmacist if they know about any effects the medicine might have on blood sugar levels. If you start to take any vitamins or herbal supplements, you should also mention these to your doctor so they can check if there are interactions. If youll be using a medicine long-term, talk to your doctor about its effect on glucose levels and if there is an alternative that could be taken that has no effect. If not, work on a plan with your diabetes care team to evaluate the effect and, if necessary, come up with a way to counter it. If a medication you need appears on this list or the Diabetes in Control list, it doesnt mean you cant use it. There just may need to be adjustments made to other diabetes medications to offset any effects. Do you have an idea you would like to write about for Insulin Nation? Send your pitch to Thanks for reading this Insulin Nation article. Want more Type 1 news? Have Type 2 diabetes or know someone who does? Try Continue reading >>

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

If you have diabetes or high blood sugar, you probably know some of the things that cause your glucose (another name for blood sugar) to go up. Like a meal with too many carbohydrates, or not enough exercise. But other medicines you might take to keep yourself healthy can cause a spike, too. Know Your Meds Medicines you get with a prescription and some that you buy over the counter (OTC) can be a problem for people who need to control their blood sugar. Prescription medicines that can raise your glucose include: Steroids (also called corticosteroids). They treat diseases caused by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and allergies. Common steroids include hydrocortisone and prednisone. But steroid creams (for a rash) or inhalers (for asthma) aren’t a problem. Drugs that treat high blood pressure, such as beta-blockers and thiazide diuretics High doses of asthma medicines, or drugs that you inject for asthma treatment OTC medicines that can raise your blood sugar include: Cough syrup. Ask your doctor if you should take regular or sugar-free. How Do You Decide What to Take? Even though these medicines can raise your blood sugar, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take them if you need them. The most important thing is to work with your doctor on the right way to use them. If you have diabetes or you’re watching your blood sugar, ask your doctor before you take new medicines or change any medicines, even if it’s just something for a cough or cold. (Remember, just being sick can raise your blood sugar.) Make sure your doctor knows all the medicines you take -- for diabetes or any other reason. If one of them may affect your blood sugar, she may prescribe a lower dose or tell you to take the medicine for a shorter time. You may need to check your blood s Continue reading >>

I Am Diabetic And My Dr Prescribed Azithromycin In Case My Tooth Gets Infected While On Vacation. I?

I Am Diabetic And My Dr Prescribed Azithromycin In Case My Tooth Gets Infected While On Vacation. I?

I am diabetic and my dr prescribed azithromycin in case my tooth gets infected while on vacation. I? azithromycin , dosage , diabetic , prescription , tooth ... took the first dose last night due to a possible abscess tooth. Today my sugar reading was quite high 245. Can Azithromycin cause this? No its not the medicine. Its the infection's effect on your body. Infection will raise your blood sugar and for diabetics its often the first sign of infection. I would keep taking it if I were you. Still looking for answers? Try searching for what you seek or ask your own question . Didn't take azithromycin 2x 500mg as prescribed. Help!? Azithromycin - I took 4 pills, had sex the same night. My doctor did this just in case. Turns out i? By clicking Subscribe, I agree to the Drugs.com Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of Drugs.com subscriptions at any time. The easiest way to lookup drug information, identify pills, check interactions and set up your own personal medication records. Available for Android and iOS devices. Subscribe to receive email notifications whenever new articles are published. Drugs.com provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products. This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Data sources include Micromedex (updated Nov 1st, 2018), Cerner Multum (updated Nov 1st, 2018), Wolters Kluwer (updated Oct 31st, 2018) and others. To view content sources and attributions, please refer to our editorial policy . Continue reading >>

Antibiotics Can Cause Dangerous Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

Antibiotics Can Cause Dangerous Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

Diabetes patients who take a certain class of antibiotics are more likely to have severe blood sugar fluctuations than those who take other types of the drugs, a new study finds. The increased risk was low but doctors should consider it when prescribing the class of antibiotics, known as fluoroquinolones, to people with diabetes, the researchers said. This class of antibiotics, which includes drugs such as Cipro (ciprofloxacin), Levaquin (levofloxacin) and Avelox (moxifloxacin), is commonly used to treat conditions such as urinary tract infections and community-acquired pneumonia. One expert said the study should serve as a wake-up call for doctors. "Given a number of alternatives, physicians may consider prescribing alternate antibiotics ... in the place of fluoroquinolones (particularly moxifloxacin) to patients with diabetes," said Dr. Christopher Ochner, assistant professor of pediatrics and adolescent medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. "In general, this study demonstrates that closer attention needs to be paid to particular drug-condition interactions." The study included about 78,000 people with diabetes in Taiwan. The researchers looked at the patients' use of three classes of antibiotics: fluoroquinolones; second-generation cephalosporins (cefuroxime, cefaclor, or cefprozil); or macrolides (clarithromycin or azithromycin). The investigators also looked for any emergency-room visits or hospitalizations for severe blood sugar swings among the patients in the 30 days after they started taking the antibiotics. The results showed that patients who took fluoroquinolones were more likely to have severe blood sugar swings than those who took antibiotics in the other classes. The level of risk varied according to the specific fluor Continue reading >>

Drug Induced Diabetes

Drug Induced Diabetes

Tweet A number of medications have side effects which include the raising of blood glucose levels. Drug induced diabetes is when use of a specific medication has lead to the development of diabetes. In some cases the development of diabetes may be reversible if use of the medication is discontinued, but in other cases drug-induced diabetes may be permanent. Drug induced diabetes is a form of secondary diabetes, in other words diabetes that is a consequence of having another health condition. Which drugs can induce diabetes? A number of drugs have been linked with an increased risk development of type 2 diabetes. Corticosteroids Thiazide diuretics Beta-blockers Antipsychotics Is diabetes permanent? Diabetes may not be permanent but this can depend on other health factors. With some medications, blood glucose levels may return back to normal once the medication is stopped but, in some cases, the development of diabetes may be permanent. Managing drug induced diabetes If you need to continue taking the medication that has brought on diabetes, it may make your diabetes more difficult to control than would otherwise be the case. If you are able to stop the course of medication, you may find your blood glucose levels become slightly easier to manage. Following a healthy diet and meeting the recommended exercise guidelines will help to improve your chances of managing your blood glucose levels. Can drug induced diabetes be prevented? It may be possible to reduce the risk of developing diabetes by ensuring you to keep to a healthy lifestyle whilst you are on the medication. Being on smaller doses of the medication or shorter periods of time may help to reduce the likelihood of developing high blood sugar levels and diabetes. Doctors will usually try to put you on the smallest e Continue reading >>

Zithromax (azithromycin): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses

Zithromax (azithromycin): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses

(azithromycin) Tablets and Oral Suspension ZITHROMAX (azithromycin tablets and oral suspension)contains the active ingredient azithromycin, a macrolide antibacterial drug , fororal administration. Azithromycin has the chemical name (2R,3S,4R,5R,8R,10R,11R,12S,13S,14R)-13-[(2,6-dideoxy-3-C-methyl-3-O-methyl--L-ribo-hexopyranosyl)oxy]-2-ethyl-3,4,10-trihydroxy-3,5,6,8,10,12,14-heptamethyl-11-[[3,4,6- trideoxy-3-(dimethylamino)--D-xylo-hexopyranosyl]oxy]-1-oxa-6-azacyclopentadecan-15-one.Azithromycin is derived from erythromycin ; however, it differs chemically fromerythromycin in that a methyl-substituted nitrogen atom is incorporated intothe lactone ring. Its molecular formula is C38H72N2O12,and its molecular weight is 749.0. Azithromycin has the following structural formula: Azithromycin, as the dihydrate, is a white crystallinepowder with a molecular formula of C38H72N2O122H2O and a molecularweight of 785.0. ZITHROMAX tablets contain azithromycin dihydrateequivalent to 600 mg azithromycin. They also contain the following inactive ingredients:dibasic calcium phosphate anhydrous, pregelatinized starch, sodiumcroscarmellose, magnesium stearate, sodium lauryl sulfate, and an aqueous filmcoat consisting of hypromellose, titanium dioxide, lactose, and triacetin. ZITHROMAX for oral suspension is supplied in a single-dosepacket containing azithromycin dihydrate equivalent to 1 g azithromycin. Italso contains the following inactive ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide,sodium phosphate tribasic, anhydrous; spray dried artificial banana flavor,spray dried artificial cherry flavor, and sucrose. To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria andmaintain the effectiveness of ZITHROMAX and other antibacterial drugs, ZITHROMAXshould be used only to treat infections that are p Continue reading >>

Endocrine Society Reading Room | Antibiotics And Blood Glucose | Medpage Today

Endocrine Society Reading Room | Antibiotics And Blood Glucose | Medpage Today

Dr. Basen describes his experience and shares data from a handful of studies This Reading Room is a collaboration between MedPage Today and: Christy Foster, MD Pediatric Endocrine fellow University of Tennessee Health Science Center Memphis, TN This article looked at trials that have examined the effects of antibiotic use on glucose levels in patients with diabetes. One 2013 study looked 78,000 patients with diabetes from January 2006 to November 2007. They examined the effects of 3 different classes of antibiotics on blood sugar swings: fluoroquinolones, second generation cephalosporins, and macrolides. The study recorded the number of emergency department visits or hospitalizations due to blood sugar swings in the 30-day period after starting antibiotics. Results showed that people with diabetes using oral fluoroquinolones are at highest risk for severe blood sugar swings. The absolute risk of hyperglycemia per 1000 individuals was 6.9 for moxifloxacin, 3.9 for levofloxacin, and 4.0 for ciprofloxacin. The absolute risk of hypoglycemia was 10 per 1000 individuals taking moxifloxacin, 9.3 for levofloxacin and 7.9 for ciprofloxacin. In comparison, the absolute risk of hyperglycemia per 1000 individuals was 1.6 for those taking macrolides and 2.1 per 1000 for those taking cephalosporins. For hypoglycemia, the absolute risk per 1000 was 3.7 for macrolides and 3.2 for cephalosporins. Dr. Lai, the lead investigator of the study, suggested that moxifloxacin was the drug associated with the highest risk of hypoglycemia, followed by levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin, and that other antibiotics should be considered if dysglycemia is a concern. The study does suggest causation mainly with fluoroquinolones and macrolides, however further studies are needed. There appears to be a gap Continue reading >>

Azithromycin In An Older Woman With Diabetic Gastroparesis.

Azithromycin In An Older Woman With Diabetic Gastroparesis.

1. Am J Ther. 2008 Jan-Feb;15(1):85-8. doi: 10.1097/MJT.0b013e31814daff6. Azithromycin in an older woman with diabetic gastroparesis. Sutera L(1), Dominguez LJ, Belvedere M, Putignano E, Vernuccio L, Ferlisi A,Fazio G, Costanza G, Barbagallo M. (1)Geriatric Unit, Post-Graduate School of Geriatrics, University of Palermo, Italy. Diabetic neuropathy is a common chronic complication of diabetes and cause ofsignificant morbidity and mortality, because it may involve the autonomous andperipheral nervous systems. Autonomic diabetic neuropathy is a challengingchronic complication of long-standing diabetes manifested with hypotension,syncope, gastroparesis, diarrhea, constipation, bladder dysfunction, sexualdysfunction, cardiac arrest, and/or sudden death. We present a case of diabeticgastroparesis in an older woman. The patient was an 83-year-old woman with a40-year history of type 2 diabetes who was admitted with hypoglycemia,malnutrition, persistent vomiting, and obstinate constipation. After severalunsuccessful attempts with different therapies, we administered intravenousazithromycin (500 mg/day). After 3 days of treatment, vomiting was resolved andthe patient evacuated normal feces, with notable improvement in the generalconditions and metabolic control. Because diabetic gastroparesis frequently isdifficult to manage clinically and there are few beneficial therapeutic choicesavailable at present, the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin, which has strongprokinetic properties, may be a useful option in the treatment of this complexcondition. Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Low Blood Sugar

Drug-induced Low Blood Sugar

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is common in people with diabetes who are taking insulin or other medicines to control their diabetes. All of the following can cause blood sugar (glucose) level to drop: Drinking alcohol Getting too much activity Intentionally or unintentionally overdosing on the medicines used to treat diabetes Missing meals Even when diabetes is managed very carefully, the medicines used to treat diabetes can result in drug-induced low blood sugar. The condition may also occur when someone without diabetes takes a medicine used to treat diabetes. In rare cases, non-diabetes-related medicines can cause low blood sugar. Medicines that can cause drug-induced low blood sugar include: Bactrim (an antibiotic) Beta-blockers Haloperidol Insulin MAO inhibitors Metformin when used with sulfonylureas Pentamidine Quinidine Quinine SGLT2 inhibitors (such as dapagliflozin and empagliflozin) Sulfonylureas Thiazolidinediones (such as Actos and Avandia) Continue reading >>

Antibiotics And Diabetes: Do The Two Mix?

Antibiotics And Diabetes: Do The Two Mix?

Antibiotics and Diabetes: Do the Two Mix? Chances are, at some point in your life youve taken a course of antibiotics. Maybe you took penicillin as a child for strep throat. Or perhaps youve been given azithromycin (brand names Zithromax, Z-Pak, and others) for a sinus or upper respiratory infection. No doubt, antibiotics are lifesavers in most instances. You might have wondered how antibiotics affect your diabetes control, if at all. And even if youve never given it a thought, there are a few pointers to keep in mind when it comes to using antibiotics. Antibiotics are medicines that fight infections caused by bacteria. They kill bacteria or keep them from reproducing. Antibiotics are powerful drugs that, when used properly, can save lives. (Unfortunately, antibiotics are often used improperly, and thats creating a serious set of problems, which Ill get to in a moment.) Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin in 1928 (a good piece of trivia to remember), and now there are several antibiotics that are related to penicillin, including ampicillin, amoxicillin, and benzylpencillin. These drugs are used to treat a variety of infections, such as chest infections, urinary tract infections (UTIs) , and skin infections. There are also more modern antibiotics available, such as: Cephalosporins: used to treat UTIs, ear and skin infections, respiratory infections, bacterial meningitis, and sepsis. These include cephalexin (Keflex). Macrolides: used to treat lung and chest infections, and are also used in case of a penicillin allergy or penicillin resistance. These include erythromycin (E-Mycin), clarithromycin (Biaxin), and azithromycin (Zitromax, Z-pak, and others). Tetracyclines: often used to treat acne and rosacea. These include tetracycline (Sumycin, Panmycin) and doxycycline Continue reading >>

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