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Are Noodles Good For A Diabetic?

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

One of my favorite foods is pasta. I think I could eat pasta every day and never tire of it. And when I’ve had a rough day, nothing comforts me as much as a plate of pasta with butter (or trans-fat-free margarine), Parmesan cheese, and freshly ground black pepper. Yet pasta is much maligned in the diabetes world. I’ve noticed that people who have diabetes become very passionate when discussing this food. There’s the camp that is indignant at the idea that pasta even exists — it spikes up blood glucose, causes weight gain, and may just be responsible for global warming (OK, that’s an exaggeration). There’s another camp who still eats pasta, but feels horribly guilty for doing so, and will swear with their right hand in the air that, “I really only ate a half a cup” (and 99% of the time, it’s just not the case). I don’t mean to trivialize the subject. Pasta can be tricky to fit into one’s diabetes eating plan. But not because it sends blood glucose levels to the moon. My belief (and you’re welcome to disagree with me) is that most of us struggle with portion control. It’s been engrained in us that pasta is a main dish: that it should be piled high on the plate and smothered in red sauce, with a crusty, buttery slice of garlic bread resting on the side. This is where the problems come in. Here’s what I mean. Take a look at the calories and carbs in the pasta meal that I just mentioned: 3 cups of pasta: 135 grams of carbohydrate, 663 calories 1 cup of sauce: 30 grams of carbohydrate, 185 calories 1 slice of garlic bread: 24 grams of carbohydrate, 170 calories Total: 189 grams of carbohydrate, 1,018 calories If you dine in an Italian restaurant and manage to clean your plate, you’ll consume even more carbohydrate and calories. When you look at p Continue reading >>

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Figuring out the best foods to eat when you have diabetes can be tough. The main goal is to keep blood sugar levels well-controlled. However, it's also important to eat foods that help prevent diabetes complications like heart disease. Here are the 16 best foods for diabetics, both type 1 and type 2. Fatty fish is one of the healthiest foods on the planet. Salmon, sardines, herring, anchovies and mackerel are great sources of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, which have major benefits for heart health. Getting enough of these fats on a regular basis is especially important for diabetics, who have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke (1). DHA and EPA protect the cells that line your blood vessels, reduce markers of inflammation and improve the way your arteries function after eating (2, 3, 4, 5). A number of observational studies suggest that people who eat fatty fish regularly have a lower risk of heart failure and are less likely to die from heart disease (6, 7). In studies, older men and women who consumed fatty fish 5–7 days per week for 8 weeks had significant reductions in triglycerides and inflammatory markers (8, 9). Fish is also a great source of high-quality protein, which helps you feel full and increases your metabolic rate (10). Fatty fish contain omega-3 fats that reduce inflammation and other risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Leafy green vegetables are extremely nutritious and low in calories. They're also very low in digestible carbs, which raise your blood sugar levels. Spinach, kale and other leafy greens are good sources of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C. In one study, increasing vitamin C intake reduced inflammatory markers and fasting blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure Continue reading >>

Do Noodles Increase Blood Sugar?

Do Noodles Increase Blood Sugar?

Noodles are high in carbohydrates and can increase your blood sugar. Does Green Plantain Raise Your Blood Sugar? Noodles fall into the grains and starchy foods group and tend to be somewhat high in carbohydrates, so they can raise your blood sugar levels. The amount they increase your blood sugar, however, will depend on the type you choose, how much you eat and what you eat with your noodles. Higher-carbohydrate foods tend to have more of an effect on your blood sugar levels than foods that contain fewer carbohydrates. A 1-cup serving of cooked egg noodles has 40.3 grams of carbohydrates, including 1.9 grams of fiber. The same amount of spaghetti noodles provides 43.2 grams of carbohydrates, including 2.5 grams of fiber. Opt for whole-grain spaghetti noodles, and a 1-cup serving contains 37.2 grams of carbohydrates, including 6.3 grams of fiber. Because these noodles provide more than 5 grams of fiber, you can subtract half the fiber from the carbohydrate count, according to the American Diabetes Association, giving you a total of 34.1 net carbohydrates. A serving of carbohydrates for a diabetic is 15 grams, so a cup of noodles counts as about three carbohydrate servings. Foods that are low on the glycemic index with scores of 55 or below aren't as likely to cause your blood sugar levels to spike as foods high on the GI scale with scores of 70 or above. Different types of noodles have different GI scores, with egg noodles at 40, spaghetti boiled for 10 to 15 minutes at 44 and whole-wheat spaghetti at 37. Boiling noodles for longer times will increase the GI score, and leaving them al dente will decrease the score slightly. The glycemic load is a more accurate predictor of your blood sugar response than the glycemic index alone, since it takes into account the amount o Continue reading >>

Spotlight On... Diabetic Diets

Spotlight On... Diabetic Diets

A healthy, balanced diet is key to keeping your blood sugar levels in check and your diabetes under control... What is diabetes? Diabetes is a lifelong condition caused by a failure of the blood sugar regulation mechanism in the body. This is controlled by a hormone called insulin. Diabetes results when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or cells of the body become resistant to insulin so blood sugar levels are not controlled as they should be. Without the proper function of insulin, sugar cannot enter muscle or fat cells, causing serious secondary complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, neuropathy and other complications. Type 1 diabetes Insulin dependent, less common and usually develops before the age of 30. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas stops producing insulin. The exact cause is unknown but some believe that it is an autoimmune response in which the body attacks its own pancreatic cells. People with Type 1 diabetes must take insulin for life. Type 2 diabetes Non-insulin dependent, used to be most common in later life but is becoming increasingly more prevalent in younger generation largely due to an increase in obesity. In Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still produces insulin, but either it is not producing enough or the body does not respond to it properly. The most common cause of type 2 diabetes is obesity. In many cases, Type 2 diabetes can be avoided through eating a healthy, balanced diet and taking regular exercise and often can be controlled in the same way if diagnosed. However, some cases will require medication and your doctor should be the one to determine whether this is necessary. Recent research has reported interesting evidence to support the reversal of type 2 diabetes. Research funded by Diabetes UK and per Continue reading >>

5 Diabetes Pasta Alternatives You Will Want To Try

5 Diabetes Pasta Alternatives You Will Want To Try

Lucky for us, great alternatives to traditional pasta are all the rage these days. We’d like to share some pasta ideas that may work better for you and your blood sugar levels. 5 Diabetes Pasta Alternatives: Shirataki “Miracle Noodles” A serving of these has zero grams of carbohydrate and zero calories! These noodles are sold in ready-to-eat packages and can be purchased online and in health food stores. These translucent Japanese noodles are made from a kind of fiber that comes from the konjac plant and don’t have a lot of flavor. These are amazing as a noodle replacement in chicken noodle soup and stir-fry recipes. Shirataki noodles are super healthy, acting as a prebiotic in your gut due to the type of fiber they contain which also delays stomach emptying and keeps you feeling full for longer. Zucchini Linguini You can make this simply by using a julienne peeler or spiralizer to get thin strips of zucchini that resemble noodles. Then toss them raw with vegetables and olive oil. Or you could sauté, boil, or microwave the noodles and top with chicken and pesto. Zucchini has such a mild flavor, the possibilities are endless and with 2 grams of carbs per every 2 oz, you may be able to have a nice, hearty serving. Spaghetti Squash Pasta To make spaghetti squash pasta that tastes heavenly with meatballs and marinara you just slice a spaghetti squash in half and spoon out the seeds. Then, brush with olive oil and top with salt and pepper. place in a pan covered in parchment paper with the cut side facing up and roast for about 45 minutes. Finally, you’ll just use a fork to pull out all the “noodles”, which only contain about 3-4 grams of carbs per 2 oz serving. Eggplant Lasagna Do you miss eating lasagna? Try replacing the flat pasta noodles with strips of fi Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

To eat or not to eat? Eggs are a versatile food and a great source of protein. The American Diabetes Association considers eggs an excellent choice for people with diabetes. That’s primarily because one large egg contains about half a gram of carbohydrates, so it’s thought that they aren’t going to raise your blood sugar. Eggs are high in cholesterol, though. One large egg contains nearly 200 mg of cholesterol, but whether or not this negatively affects the body is debatable. Monitoring your cholesterol is important if you have diabetes because diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High levels of cholesterol in the bloodstream also raise the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. But dietary intake of cholesterol doesn’t have as profound an effect on blood levels as was once thought. So, it’s important for anyone with diabetes to be aware of and minimize other heart disease risks. A whole egg contains about 7 grams of protein. Eggs are also an excellent source of potassium, which supports nerve and muscle health. Potassium helps balance sodium levels in the body as well, which improves your cardiovascular health. Eggs have many nutrients, such as lutein and choline. Lutein protects you against disease and choline is thought to improve brain health. Egg yolks contain biotin, which is important for healthy hair, skin, and nails, as well as insulin production. Eggs from chickens that roam on pastures are high in omega-3s, which are beneficial fats for people with diabetes. Eggs are easy on the waistline, too. One large egg has only about 75 calories and 5 grams of fat, only 1.6 grams of which are saturated fat. Eggs are versatile and can be prepared in different ways to suit your tastes. You can make an already-healthy food even better by mixi Continue reading >>

Study: Eating Ramen Noodles Regularly Can Lead To Higher Risk Of Heart Disease, Diabetes

Study: Eating Ramen Noodles Regularly Can Lead To Higher Risk Of Heart Disease, Diabetes

Ramen noodles can be a lifesaver for college students on a budget, however, a recent study published in the Journal of Nutrition, found that ramen noodles might be more trouble than they are worth. The study linked the consumption of instant noodles — often referred to as ramen — to heart disease and other health issues, particularly in woman. The researchers analyzed a group of 10,711 South Korean adults, ages 19-64. Of the sample group, 54.5 percent were women. In its conclusion, the study found that women who consumed ramen at least twice a week were 68 percent more likely to have metabolic syndrome than women who had a healthier diet. Metabolic syndrome is “a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors,” said Dr. Martha Gulati, section director of Preventative Cardiology and Women’s Cardiovascular Health at the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center. Those risk factors include high blood pressure, larger waist circumference, higher blood glucose levels, high triglyceride levels and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. “If you have any three of those five risk factors, you have the metabolic syndrome,” Gulati said. “Which means that there are higher risks of heart disease and diabetes in the future.” According to the National Blood, Lung and Heart Institute, a person who has metabolic syndrome is typically “twice as likely to develop heart disease and five times as likely to develop diabetes” compared to a person who does not have metabolic syndrome. Gulati advised against a diet heavy on noodles, despite how cost-efficient and easy they might be. “They’re cheap, and they’re easy,” Gulati said. “But you can’t look at that food and think that it’s nutritionally complete or that it’s healthy for anyone to consume, particularly on Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Noodles

Can Diabetics Eat Noodles

Diabetics can eat and enjoy noodles as part of a healthy diet that emphasizes moderation, portion control and balancing diet with physical activity. Whole grain noodles, in particular, are full of nutrients. Noodles should be paired with other nutrient-dense foods to control blood sugar, maintain a healthy weight and prevent other chronic diseases. A healthy diabetic diet focuses on whole grains, fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products, lean proteins and healthy fats. Foods high in saturated and trans fats, added sugar, sodium, refined grains and fatty meats should be avoided because these can contribute to weight gain, obesity, diabetic complications and other diseases like cancer, high blood pressure and heart disease. Whole Grains Noodles are a type of grain. Federal dietary guidelines recommend making at least half of all grains whole grain. Whole wheat, brown rice, quinoa and barley are types of whole grains. Whole grains contain more vitamins, minerals and fiber than refined grains because they are less processed. MayoClinic.com says fiber slows sugar absorption, which can improve blood sugar levels. Fiber can also help lower cholesterol, increase satiety and improve digestive health. Easy-to-find whole grain noodles include whole wheat or whole grain pasta, quinoa pasta and brown rice noodles. Nutrition and Serving Size The American Diabetes Association says to control portion size by making 25 percent of your plate grains or starch. Diabetics that use the diabetes exchange list can consider 1/3 cup of cooked noodles or pasta one serving or one starch exchange. 1/3 cup of whole wheat pasta has approximately 58 calories, 2 grams of protein, 12 grams of carbohydrate, 1 to 2 grams of fiber and less than 1 gram of fat. It is also a good source of iron, magnesium, Continue reading >>

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

By Brandon May Bread is perhaps one of the most widely used types of food on the planet. It can also be a food that poses a health risk for people with diabetes. Despite the risk, bread can be one of the hardest foods to give up. Fortunately, there are breads on the market that don't raise blood sugar to extreme levels. Whole-grain breads with high-fiber ingredients, like oats and bran, may be the best option for people with diabetes. Making bread at home with specific, diabetes-friendly ingredients may also help reduce the impact bread has on blood sugar levels. The role of nutrition in controlling diabetes Diabetes has two main types: type 1 and type 2. People with type 1 diabetes have difficulty producing insulin, which is a hormone that "captures" blood sugar (or glucose) and transfers it into cells. Glucose is the preferred energy source for cells. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes is also the easier form to prevent and manage with lifestyle changes and medication. According to the World Health Organization, over 422 million people have type 2 diabetes worldwide. In the earlier phase of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can produce insulin, but cells have become insensitive to its effects. This is sometimes due to poor diet, genetics, and lifestyle habits. Because of this, cells can't access blood sugar following a meal. Nutrition plays a crucial role in diabetes control. It's only through putting proper dietary planning into practice that good blood sugar management can be accomplished. A good diet must also be combined with lifestyle changes and medication. A carbohydrate is one of the three major nutrients essential to human health. However, carbohydrates also raise blood sugar and can reduce effective diabetes control. This Continue reading >>

Sweet Potatoes Can Help Fight Diabetes

Sweet Potatoes Can Help Fight Diabetes

The main carbohydrate (read: sugar) source of the typical American dinner is either pasta, rice or potatoes. Anybody who is trying to keep their blood sugar down and improve their diabetes knows that these carbohydrates quickly convert into sugar during the digestion process, releasing a surge of insulin. This axis-of-evil blood-sugar-spikers are not a smart dining option for those looking to lose weight or lower their blood sugar levels. Dinners are most often consumed at around 7:00 p.m. Few Americans go for very long walks after dinner or engage in other forms of exercise; the most common activity is watching T.V. Though eating occasional high-carb meals like rice, pasta and potatoes won’t necessarily guarantee inducing someone into a diabetic coma, these foods should be consumed rarely and certainly earlier in the day (lunch) so there is plenty of time to burn off the sugars. Low-carb noodle and rice replacements like Miracle Noodle and Miracle Rice are perfect for those managing diabetes. Comprised entirely of fiber, Miracle Noodle products slightly expand in the stomach, helping you stay full, preventing the dangerous dietary pitfalls of cravings, largely brought on by consuming foods that burn up too quickly (carbohydrates). But what about potatoes? A major staple of the American diet, can potatoes be a part of a healthy, low glycemic diet? Can they be added with Miracle Noodle products? And what’s the better potato: white or sweet? White potatoes and the glycemic index Baked potatoes with bacon, chives and sour cream....what carb-crazy dieter doesn’t like the sound of that mouth-watering side dish? Though adding butter or sour cream and bacon bits to a baked potato might not sound like a healthy option to some, it’s actually better than eating a potato p Continue reading >>

I Have Type 2 Diabetes .. Is Ramen Noodles Okay To Eat Without The Seasoning Packet?

I Have Type 2 Diabetes .. Is Ramen Noodles Okay To Eat Without The Seasoning Packet?

    Ramen noodles have a really high glycemic index, so they're usually not recommended for type 2 diabetics. Have you seen a nutritionist? You might want to get your physician to refer you to one. The American Diabetes Association also publishes guidelines. Check out this link: I live by myself and it is so convenient to use the ramen noodles instead of spaghetti. I forgot to mention that I also have high blood pressure, so I have two whammys against me. It is so difficult to find things to eat which don't cost an arm and a leg and need intense preparation and or have a list ofs ingredient an arm long that you don't normally stock. What about buying whole grains from bulk bins? They're affordable, easy to cook, and healthy. The whole grain pasta is definitely a good idea, I'm sure you can find some not-so-pricey options. This is a low-maintenance healthy recipe. I've had it without the cheese and it's still great. There are some healtheir Ramen products now on the market - noodles are not fried and broth is low sodium - but that probably won't help withh the glycemic rating. What about those packages of instant brown rice? they don't think they taste like slow cooked brown rice but with low sodium broth and some thin slices of peppers or other veggies, it could be a quick and more nutritious snack. There are also some whole wheat noodles out now that actually taste great - not like sand. The Bionaturae brand has gotten high marks - I've tried it but haven't done a lot of comparison. With a little olive oil, a little pepper, and some grated Parmesan, it can be delicious and quick. And you won't be hungry again in 90 minutes. Voted the Best Answer! Have you tried soba noodles? They're made with buckwheat flour as well as regular flour, so their glycemic value Continue reading >>

Dining Out With Diabetes: Chinese Restaurants

Dining Out With Diabetes: Chinese Restaurants

Chinese food is one of the most popular dining options in North America – many people will admit to having at least one Chinese take out menu stashed in a kitchen drawer. However, as is the case with most ethnic cuisine, America’s version of Chinese food tends to differ from traditional preparations in ways that make it challenging to incorporate into a healthy diet. People with diabetes need to be especially careful, because certain entrees are high not only high in carbs, but also in fat and sodium. More than Just Oodles of Noodles The great thing about Chinese food is the tremendous variety that it offers. You can eat healthy foods if you look closely at the menu and know what to pick. Steamed rice, veggie dishes, and soups are just a few examples of lighter options for people with diabetes who are trying to watch their calories and carbs. Even certain beef entrees can be part of your meal plan. For example, a 3 oz serving of broccoli with beef and 1/2 a cup of steamed rice from Panda Express has about 300 calories and 20 grams of carbs, an acceptable amount for most diabetes meal plans. Veggies are a staple in Chinese dishes and are much lower in carbs than starchy sides like fried noodles. Be creative and try bok choy, sprouts, shitake mushrooms, or eggplant as side dishes with 3-4 ounces of meat or tofu. Diabetes Diners: Keep it fun If you really want to order a favorite dish, be smart: focus on the flavor and keep your portions small. Many of the most popular entrees, like sweet & sour pork and lemon chicken, are deep-fried and therefore have higher fat and calories. Other favorites, like fried rice and chow mein, are often high in carbs and fat. One way to eat healthy is to ask for the sauce on the side and enjoy a lighter version of your favorite dish. For Continue reading >>

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

When you have diabetes, it is important to keep blood sugar levels as stable as possible. Good blood sugar control can help prevent or slow the progression of some of the main medical complications of diabetes (1, 2). For this reason, avoiding or minimizing foods that cause big blood sugar spikes is essential. Despite being a healthy fruit, bananas are pretty high in both carbs and sugar, the main nutrients that raise blood sugar levels. So, should you be eating bananas if you have diabetes? How do they affect your blood sugar? If you have diabetes, being aware of the amount and type of carbs in your diet is important. This is because carbs raise your blood sugar level more than other nutrients, which means they can greatly affect your blood sugar control. When blood sugar rises in non-diabetic people, the body produces insulin. It helps the body move sugar out of the blood and into the cells where it's used or stored. However, this process doesn't work as it should in diabetics. Instead, either the body doesn't produce enough insulin or the cells are resistant to the insulin that is made. If not managed properly, this can result in high-carb foods causing big blood sugar spikes or constantly high blood sugar levels, both of which are bad for your health. 93% of the calories in bananas come from carbs. These carbs are in the form of sugar, starch and fiber (3). A single medium-sized banana contains 14 grams of sugar and 6 grams of starch (3). Bananas are high in carbs, which cause blood sugar levels to rise more than other nutrients. In addition to starch and sugar, a medium-sized banana contains 3 grams of fiber. Everyone, including diabetics, should eat adequate amounts of dietary fiber due to its potential health benefits. However, fiber is especially important for p Continue reading >>

Zero Noodles Ok?? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Zero Noodles Ok?? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi everyone, have a quick question.... has anyone tied the Zero Noodles at all? if so did they effect your blood sugar levels at all? I have been told that they are very good to help treat diabetes but just want to be sure before I go ahead and order a load. Also are nice/ easy to incorporate into the diet??? There was a long thread on these once. Basically, they won't TREAT your diabetes, but they won't affect your BGs either. They do have zero carbs. Only issue is, they apparently taste of nothing. Not tried them myself. I would suggest just getting a small quantity to try (despite higher postage costs per order) in case they taste rubbish. But they WON'T put your BGs up. I bought some Bare Naked noodles. Very low carb, and they did nothing to my BG. They needed a bit of work to perk them up, but made a nice change. Confused. Do they have protein in them then? or fat ? otherwise is there a point to eating them (rather than the box they come in?) Continue reading >>

Cellophane Noodles With Pork

Cellophane Noodles With Pork

Choices: Starch 2, Nonstarchy Vegetable 1, Lean Protein 1, Fat 0.5 Cooking Time: 20 minutes (excluding time to boil water) (12-oz) package shredded tri-color coleslaw mix (about 6 3/4 cups) In a heavy skillet or wok over medium-high heat, heat 1 tsp of the sesame oil. Add the garlic and scallions and stir-fry for 1 minute. Add the cabbage and stir-fry for 3 minutes. Add the crushed red pepper flakes and pork and saut for 5 to 6 minutes, until the pork loses its pinkness. Turn off or remove the wok from the heat and set the pork mixture aside; keep warm. Bring a 3-quart pot of water to boiling. Add the cellophane noodles, turn off the heat, and let the noodles stand in the water for 5 to 15 minutes, just until soft. Drain. Add the noodles to the pork. Toss very gently using tongs. In a small bowl, combine the remaining sesame oil, the rice vinegar, soy sauce, hoisin sauce, and sugar; whisk well. Add the sauce to the pork and noodles mixture and mix gently. Top with the slivered almonds and cilantro. Continue reading >>

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