diabetestalk.net

Are Low Blood Sugar Levels Dangerous

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar - Topic Overview

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar - Topic Overview

You may have these symptoms when your blood sugar has dropped below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). When you have had diabetes for many years, you may not always develop symptoms of mild low blood sugar. Some young children with diabetes cannot recognize symptoms of low blood sugar. Others can, but not every time. To be safe, the parents need to do a home blood sugar test whenever they suspect low blood sugar in a child. Symptoms may include: Sweating (almost always present). Check for sweating on the back of your neck at your hairline. Nervousness, shakiness, and weakness. A fast heartbeat and feeling anxious. These symptoms may go away shortly after you eat food that contains sugar. If your blood sugar continues to drop (below 40 mg/dL), your behavior may change. Symptoms may include: Inability to concentrate. Confusion and irritability. Slurred speech. Unsteadiness when standing or walking. Personality changes, such as anger or crying. Symptoms of severe low blood sugar (usually below 20 mg/dL) include: If your blood sugar drops while you are sleeping, your partner or other family members may notice that you are sweating and behaving differently. Signs of low blood sugar at night (nocturnal hypoglycemia) include: Restlessness. Making unusual noises. Attempting to get out of bed or accidentally rolling out of bed. Sweating. You may wake up with a headache in the morning if your blood sugar was low during the night. Some people have no symptoms of low blood sugar. The only symptom you may have is confusion. Or you may become unconscious before anyone realizes you have low blood sugar. You may have hypoglycemic unawareness if you: Cannot tell by your symptoms that your blood sugar is low. Have low blood sugar several times a week. Have type 1 diabetes, or have had Continue reading >>

Why Is Low Blood Sugar Dangerous?

Why Is Low Blood Sugar Dangerous?

Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that breaks down the sugar that we digest, so that it can be used by the cells of the body or stored for later use. In summary, insulin reduces the amount of sugar in the bloodstream. If diabetes goes untreated, the level of sugar in the blood will climb dangerously high over several days depending on the severity of the condition. There are 3 different types of diabetes, which are categorized by their method of treatment: Diet Controlled: This patient still produces some insulin naturally, so can control the condition by reducing the amount of sugar that they eat. Tablet Controlled: This patient still produces a small amount of insulin naturally, but needs to take tablets to help reduce the level of sugar in the blood, as well as diet control. Insulin Dependent: This patient produces little or no insulin, and has to inject themselves with insulin in order to keep sugar levels under control. Low blood sugar occurs mainly with diabetic patients who are insulin dependent, because the level of insulin in the body is now a ‘fixed’ amount because it is injected. Because the patient has injected this ‘fixed’ amount of insulin, they have to balance it with the amount of food that they eat. The blood sugar levels will fall low if: The patient does not eat enough food. The patient over exercises (burning off sugar). The patient injects too much insulin. Why is low blood sugar so dangerous? Unlike other cells in the body, the brain can only use glucose (sugar) as its source of energy. If the sugar in the blood becomes low, the brain cells are starved of energy. The signs and symptoms of low blood sugar are as a result of the ‘hungry’ brain cells becoming disordered, and the release of Continue reading >>

Are My Daily Low Blood-sugar Spells Dangerous?

Are My Daily Low Blood-sugar Spells Dangerous?

I tend to get low blood sugar at times throughout the day. I work out on a regular basis and have difficulty knowing when to eat, what to eat, how much to eat before a workout. So, information on that would be helpful. Also I am curious what kind of internal damage, if any, am I doing each time I experience low blood sugar? Dear Beth: Thanks for your question. Many people worry about low blood sugar, but in reality this is rarely a problem for other than diabetics under tight blood sugar control. Those few nondiabetics can usually avoid it with small frequent snacks containing carbohydrates. In order to be considered hypoglycemic the person has to have: 1) Symptoms of hypoglycemia, 2) A documented low blood sugar (less than 60 mg/dl) using a laboratory measurement -- not a personal glucometer -- and 3) relief of the symptoms after consumption of sugar. The symptoms of low blood sugar are sweating, trembling, a sensation of warmth, anxiety, nausea, palpitations, a fast heart rate and hunger. Most true hypoglycemic people have three or four of these symptoms and not all of them. Very low blood sugar can cause fatigue, dizziness, headache, visual disturbances, drowsiness and ultimately loss of consciousness and seizures. Again, all people with very low blood sugar will most likely not have all symptoms. Occasionally, people get hypoglycemia because they're taking certain drugs such as aspirin-like drugs, quinine-like drugs and antipsychotics such as haloperidol, or consuming alcohol. Extreme exercise also can lead to this condition. By far the most common cause of hypoglycemia is treatment of diabetes that is too strict. Some diabetics can actually get hypoglycemic by missing a meal or having a meal with fewer starches and carbohydrates than expected. Very rarely, hypoglyc Continue reading >>

Which Is More Dangerous For The Human Body Between Low Blood Sugar And High Blood Sugar?

Which Is More Dangerous For The Human Body Between Low Blood Sugar And High Blood Sugar?

Is Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) Dangerous? Low blood glucose or hypoglycemia is one of the most common problems associated with insulin treatment, but it can also happen to people with diabetes taking pills. In general, hypoglycemia is defined as a blood glucose level below 70 mg/dl. Low blood glucose is usually unpleasant, with the most common symptoms including feeling shaky, sweaty and having one's heart pound. The most common reasons for hypoglycemia are too much diabetes medicine, too little food or a delayed meal, or too much or unplanned activity. A less common, but occasional cause for hypoglycemia, is drinking alcoholic beverages. Most hypoglycemia is mild with recognizable symptoms. If quickly and appropriately treated, it is more of an inconvenience than a cause for alarm. However, severe hypoglycemia that causes mental confusion, antagonistic behaviors, unconsciousness, or seizures is a reason for alarm. We define severe hypoglycemia as the point at which you are not able to independently treat yourself. It is dangerous and to be avoided! Not because hypoglycemia, in itself, is fatal. That is very, very rare. What is dangerous is what might happen as a result of the hypoglycemia. The biggest danger is a motor vehicle accident caused, for example, by passing out at the wheel, swerving into on-coming traffic, hitting a tree, or running stop signs. Sometimes people are seriously injured in other types of accidents related to hypoglycemia, such as falling down stairs. It is equally important to avoid unconsciousness and seizures caused by hypoglycemia, not only because of the increased risk for accidents, but because of the potential for brain damage related to repeated severe hypoglycemia. Guidelines for managing hypoglycemia Recognize symptoms (physical, e Continue reading >>

Effects Of Low Blood Sugar On The Body

Effects Of Low Blood Sugar On The Body

The Effects of low blood sugar on the Body Every cell in your body needs sugar (glucose) to function. When your blood sugar levels drop too low, your cells become starved for energy. Initially, that can cause minor symptoms, but if you don’t get your blood sugar levels up soon, you’re at risk of serious complications. When your blood sugar (glucose) levels fall below the normal range, it’s called hypoglycemia, or insulin shock. Low blood sugar can happen when you skip a meal. It can also happen if your pancreas releases more insulin than it should after you’ve eaten. The most common reason for low blood sugar is diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas can no longer produce insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough, or your body can’t use it properly. To keep blood sugar levels from rising too much (hyperglycemia), you need the right amount of insulin. With insufficient insulin, your blood sugar levels rise. Too much, and your blood sugar levels can plummet. Another possible cause of low blood sugar is drinking too much alcohol, especially on an empty stomach. This can interfere with the liver’s ability to release stored glucose into your bloodstream. Hepatitis and other problems with your liver can also lead to low blood sugar. Other causes include kidney disorders, anorexia nervosa, a pancreatic tumor, or adrenal gland disorders. There are a variety of symptoms of low blood sugar, but the only way to be sure what your blood glucose levels are is by taking a blood glucose test. Generally, blood sugar levels below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) are considered too low, according to the American Diabetes Association. If you have diabetes, it’s important to monitor your blood sugar levels often. Low blood sugar can come on quickly Continue reading >>

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is common among people with diabetes and can occur even when you're carefully managing the condition. "Hypoglycemia happens when the amount of blood glucose (sugar in the blood) drops to a level that's too low to sustain normal functioning," says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, author of 2 Day Diabetes Diet. "In most people, this is defined as a blood-sugar level below 70 milligrams per deciliter." A review published in June 2015 in the journal PLoS One found that among people with type 2 diabetes, this is a far too common occurrence. Individuals with the condition had an average of 19 mild episodes of hypoglycemia per year, and nearly one severe episode per year on average. Low blood sugar was particularly common among those taking insulin. This decrease in blood sugar levels can cause both short-term complications, like confusion and dizziness, as well as more serious, long-term complications. Left untreated, it can lead to a coma and even death. To prevent hypoglycemia and its dangerous side effects, it's crucial to monitor your glucose levels and treat low blood sugar as soon as you become aware of it. Pay attention to these telltale signs of dipping blood sugar levels to make sure yours stays under control: 1. Ravenous Hunger If you've already eaten but still aren't satisfied, or if you suddenly, inexplicably feel as if you're starving, your body is signaling that it needs more glucose. Work with your healthcare team to determine the exact amount of sugar your body needs. A good starting point is the American Diabetes Association's recommendation to eat between 15 and 20 grams (g) of sugar or carbohydrates with each snack, and between 40 and 65 g at each meal. Some good options include 2 tablespoons of raisins, 4 ounces of fruit juice Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Sugar Levels & Symptoms

High And Low Blood Sugar Levels & Symptoms

It is important for people with diabetes to know the symptoms of high and low sugar levels so appropriate action can be taken to prevent health problems occurring in either the short or long term. In the case of low blood glucose levels, it is generally only people on certain medications such as insulin and tablets which directly stimulate insulin production that need to be actively aware of low blood sugar symptoms. Symptoms of high sugar levels (hyperglycemia) One or more of the following symptoms are common when blood glucose levels are too high: Increased urination Increased thirst Increased hunger Fatigue Dry mouth Dry eyes Blurred vision If sugar levels are regularly too high for a number of days or weeks, the following symptoms may also be recognised: Loss of weight, particularly muscle mass Regular urinary tract infections (UTIs) Regular episodes of thrush (yeast infections) Note that in people that are overweight, loss of weight may sometimes be more recognisable as a loss of muscle mass. High blood sugar can be uncomfortable and can increase the risk of developing long term complications if extended periods of hyperglycemia become a regular occurrence. Read more about hyperglycemia. Symptoms of low sugar levels (hypoglycemia) One or more of the following symptoms may be recognised if blood glucose levels become too low: Increased hunger Pale appearance Feeling weak Lethargy Faster heart rate Sweating Blurred vision Dizzy spells Reduced co-ordination Impaired ability to make decisions Hypoglycemia, or hypos for short, can be dangerous for people on the following anti-diabetic medications: Insulin Sulphonylureas Prandial glucose regulators (glinides) People with diabetes on these medications need to be able to spot the signs of low blood sugar levels quickly and Continue reading >>

What Are Critical Glucose Ranges?

What Are Critical Glucose Ranges?

Patients with diabetes try to keep their glucose levels in the normal range to prevent damage to internal organs and nerves, and to preserve their eyesight. They work with physicians as well as specialist nurses and dietitians to achieve this. Patients with type II diabetics, may have had symptoms of high blood glucose that led them to seek care, but often this type of diabetes is diagnosed by routine blood tests. With proper care, blood glucose levels may never reach a critical level. Type I diabetes, treated with insulin, is usually much more difficult to control, especially in adolescence. Type I diabetics are far more likely to have a critical glucose level at some time in their lives. Video of the Day Called hypoglycemia, this deficiency of glucose in the blood is considered critical at, or below, 40 milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood, or 40 mg/dL. However, this figure must be adjusted individually, as the exact level at which an a person develops symptoms varies. Insulin and other diabetes medications can cause hypoglycemia under certain conditions. As an example, skipping a meal, but taking the usual dose of insulin can cause hypoglycemia. With Type II diabetes, medication errors and drug interactions can cause hypoglycemia. It is suggested that diabetics not drive with a level below 70. According to “Understanding Pathophysiology,” the initial symptoms of headache, weakness, pallor, intense hunger, shakiness and irritability can occur with levels of 45 to 60 mg/dL. This must be treated with an immediate replacement of glucose. Severe hypoglycemia can lead to seizures, coma and even death. Blood glucose levels that are not in the critical range are not necessarily healthy ones. The American Diabetes Association has established ideal glucose levels: Continue reading >>

What Are Dangerous Blood Sugar Levels?

What Are Dangerous Blood Sugar Levels?

The best way to keep blood sugar low is to eat a healthy diet and do regular exercise. Just 20 minutes of walking 4 or 5 times a week can do wonders for lowering blood sugar. Eating a healthy diet is also very important. Do your best to limit the number of calories you eat each day. Put smaller portions of food on your plate and eat more slowly so that your body has a chance to let you know when it’s had enough to eat. Often, diet and exercise alone are not enough to control blood sugar. In this case, medicine is needed to bring the blood sugar down further. Often pills are enough, but sometimes insulin injections are needed. If medicines to lower blood sugar are started, it is still very important to keep doing regular exercise and eating a healthy diet. Another very important way to keep track of diabetes is with a blood test, which is called the “Hemoglobin A1c” test. This test is often abbreviated as “Hb A1c.” The Hb A1c test is a measure of what the average blood sugar has been over the past 3 months. It is thus a very powerful way to get an overall sense of how well diabetes has been controlled. Everyone with diabetes should have this test 2 to 4 times per year. The only way to tell if kidney damage has occurred is to test the urine for protein. This should be done once per year. The biggest risk to people with numbness from neuropathy is that they will injure their feet and will not be able to feel it. Such an injury can lead to ulcers or gangrene, and occasionally to amputation. For this reason, it is very important that patients with neuropathy learn to take special care of their feet and wear the right shoes. Diabetic retinopathy is caused by weakening and scarring of the blood vessels which lie on top of the retina, the thin lining at the back of th Continue reading >>

> When Blood Sugar Is Too Low

> When Blood Sugar Is Too Low

No matter what we're doing — even when we're sleeping — our brains depend on glucose to function. Glucose is a sugar that comes from the foods we eat, and it's also formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the cells of our body, and it's carried to each cell through the bloodstream. The blood glucose level is the amount of glucose in the blood. When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) drop too low, it's called hypoglycemia (pronounced: hi-po-gly-SEE-me-uh). Very low blood sugar levels can cause severe symptoms that need to be treated right away. People with diabetes can have low blood sugar levels because of the medicines they have to take to manage their diabetes. They may need a hormone called insulin or diabetes pills (or both) to help their bodies use the sugar in their blood. These medicines help take the sugar out of the blood and get it into the body's cells, which makes the level of sugar in the blood go down. But sometimes it's a tricky balancing act and blood sugar levels can get too low. People with diabetes need to keep their blood sugars from getting too high or too low. Part of keeping blood sugar levels in a healthy range is having good timing, and balancing when and what they eat and when they exercise with when they take medicines. Some things that can make low blood sugar levels more likely to happen are: skipping meals and snacks not eating enough food at a meal or snack exercising longer or harder than usual without eating some extra food getting too much insulin not timing the insulin doses properly with meals, snacks, and exercise Also, certain things may increase how quickly insulin gets absorbed into the bloodstream and can make hypoglycemia more likely to occur. For example, taking a hot shower Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

High And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Tweet Knowing and understanding the symptoms of high and low blood sugar should be essential for both diabetics and their friends and families. Symptoms of high blood sugar Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, is common amongst diabetics. It occurs when a diabetic person eats too much food, and has too little insulin to regulate their blood sugar. Sometimes stress can cause diabetes. Being aware of the following symptoms and staying alert for their presence, whether you are a diabetic or a family member or friend, should be essential: Need for frequent urination Drowsiness Nausea Extreme hunger and/or thirst Blurring of the vision Symptoms of low blood sugar Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, occurs when a diabetic has not eaten enough food, or has too much insulin within his or her body. An excessive amount of exercise can also cause low blood sugar levels. Be aware of low blood sugar symptoms Being aware of the following symptoms and staying alert for their presence, whether you are a diabetic or a family member or friend, should be essential: Shaking Fast heartbeat Sweating Anxiety Dizziness Extreme hunger Weakness and tiredness Irritability Why do these symptoms matter for diabetics? These symptoms are essential for diabetics to understand, because they may encounter high or low blood sugar levels from time to time. A cold or virus can cause sudden high blood sugar levels, and understand the symptoms means knowing how to deal with hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. People with diabetes who can recognise the symptoms can avoid levels that lead to medical emergencies such as diabetic ketoacidosis. Knowing your high and low blood sugar symptoms allows you to test Once you understand symptoms of high and low blood sugar, it is possible to test quickly and avoid serious proble Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

How Is Glucagon An Antagonist Of Insulin?

How Is Glucagon An Antagonist Of Insulin?

Insulin and glucagon work together to balance your blood sugar levels, keeping them in the narrow range that your body requires. These hormones are like the yin and yang of blood glucose maintenance. Read on to learn more about how they function and what can happen when they dont work well. Insulin and glucagon work in whats called a negative feedback loop. During this process, one event triggers another, which triggers another, and so on, to keep your blood sugar levels balanced. During digestion, foods that contain carbohydrates are converted into glucose. Most of this glucose is sent into your bloodstream, causing a rise in blood glucose levels. This increase in blood glucose signals your pancreas to produce insulin. The insulin tells cells throughout your body to take in glucose from your bloodstream. As the glucose moves into your cells, your blood glucose levels go down. Some cells use the glucose as energy. Other cells, such as in your liver and muscles, store any excess glucose as a substance called glycogen. Your body uses glycogen for fuel between meals. About four to six hours after you eat, the glucose levels in your blood decrease, triggering your pancreas to produce glucagon. This hormone signals your liver and muscle cells to change the stored glycogen back into glucose. These cells then release the glucose into your bloodstream so your other cells can use it for energy. This whole feedback loop with insulin and glucagon is constantly in motion. It keeps your blood sugar levels from dipping too low, ensuring that your body has a steady supply of energy. Your bodys regulation of blood glucose is an amazing metabolic feat. However, for some people, the process doesnt work properly. Diabetes mellitus is the best known condition that causes problems with bloo Continue reading >>

Is Low Blood Glucose (hypoglycemia) Dangerous?

Is Low Blood Glucose (hypoglycemia) Dangerous?

Low blood glucose or hypoglycemia is one of the most common problems associated with insulin treatment, but it can also happen to people with diabetes taking pills. In general, hypoglycemia is defined as a blood glucose level below 70 mg/dl. Low blood glucose is usually unpleasant, with the most common symptoms including feeling shaky, sweaty and having one's heart pound. The most common reasons for hypoglycemia are too much diabetes medicine, too little food or a delayed meal, or too much or unplanned activity. A less common, but occasional cause for hypoglycemia, is drinking alcoholic beverages. Most hypoglycemia is mild with recognizable symptoms. If quickly and appropriately treated, it is more of an inconvenience than a cause for alarm. However, severe hypoglycemia that causes mental confusion, antagonistic behaviors, unconsciousness, or seizures is a reason for alarm. We define severe hypoglycemia as the point at which you are not able to independently treat yourself. It is dangerous and to be avoided! Not because hypoglycemia, in itself, is fatal. That is very, very rare. What is dangerous is what might happen as a result of the hypoglycemia. The biggest danger is a motor vehicle accident caused, for example, by passing out at the wheel, swerving into on-coming traffic, hitting a tree, or running stop signs. Sometimes people are seriously injured in other types of accidents related to hypoglycemia, such as falling down stairs. It is equally important to avoid unconsciousness and seizures caused by hypoglycemia, not only because of the increased risk for accidents, but because of the potential for brain damage related to repeated severe hypoglycemia. Guidelines for managing hypoglycemia Recognize symptoms (physical, emotional, mental) and that these symptoms are v Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia, can be a dangerous condition. Low blood sugar can happen in people with diabetes who take medicines that increase insulin levels in the body. Taking too much medication, skipping meals, eating less than normal, or exercising more than usual can lead to low blood sugar for these individuals. Blood sugar is also known as glucose. Glucose comes from food and serves as an important energy source for the body. Carbohydrates — foods such as rice, potatoes, bread, tortillas, cereal, fruit, vegetables, and milk — are the body’s main source of glucose. After you eat, glucose is absorbed into your bloodstream, where it travels to your body’s cells. A hormone called insulin, which is made in the pancreas, helps your cells use glucose for energy. If you eat more glucose than you need, your body will store it in your liver and muscles or change it into fat so it can be used for energy when it’s needed later. Without enough glucose, your body cannot perform its normal functions. In the short term, people who aren’t on medications that increase insulin have enough glucose to maintain blood sugar levels, and the liver can make glucose if needed. However, for those on these specific medications, a short-term reduction in blood sugar can cause a lot of problems. Your blood sugar is considered low when it drops below 70 mg/dL. Immediate treatment for low blood sugar levels is important to prevent more serious symptoms from developing. Explaining low blood sugar in layman's terms » Symptoms of low blood sugar can occur suddenly. They include: rapid heartbeat sudden nervousness headache hunger shaking sweating People with hypoglycemic unawareness do not know their blood sugar is dropping. If you have this condition, your blood sugar Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar