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Are Blood Sugar And Glucose The Same

What Is The Difference Between Urine Glucose And Blood Glucose?

What Is The Difference Between Urine Glucose And Blood Glucose?

Glucose is a simple sugar that exists in many types of food and in your blood. It serves many functions, the most important of which is as an energy source. Your body has sensitive systems for keeping the glucose in your blood within a normal range. However, in conditions such as diabetes, blood glucose levels can become elevated, causing glucose to spill out into your urine. In pregnancy, glucose may appear in the urine, although the blood glucose level is typically normal. Video of the Day Glucose is a simple carbohydrate, and many dietary sources exist. In fact, glucose is present in nearly all foods that contain carbohydrates. Glucose can be present on its own, or paired with fructose to form the two-sugar molecule sucrose, also known as table sugar. Other sources of glucose include fruits and vegetables. Grains, legumes, nuts and seeds contain large molecules of glucose known as starch. Sweeteners such as maple syrup, honey, high-fructose corn syrup and molasses also contain abundant quantities of glucose. Animal products such as fish, being carbohydrate-free, do not contain glucose. The major function of glucose is to provide energy to your cells. Once it is broken down in your small intestine, it is absorbed into the bloodstream, where it travels throughout your body and can enter the cells of every major organ. Within your cells, glucose undergoes chemical reactions called glycolysis and the Krebs Cycle, in which it is broken down and combined with oxygen to produce ATP, the energy currency of your body. ATP, or adenosine triphosphate, helps your body undergo chemical reactions such as building new proteins and recycling old cells. The normal range for blood glucose is from 70 to 115 mg/dL, according to “Maxwell Quick Medical Reference.” To keep the glucose Continue reading >>

Are All Sugars The Same?

Are All Sugars The Same?

Not really. First, all sugars are somewhat different, chemically. Simple sugars (monosaccharides) such as fructose, galactose, glucose, xylose, and ribose - to make matters more complicated - all can assume one of a number of structures and still be considered fructose or galactose. Once two monosaccharides meet it gets even more complicated. There's sucrose which is fructose and glucose (found in honey, table sugar, high fructose corn syrup, etc.), lactulose (galactose and fructose), lactose (galactose and glucose), and more. Metabolically speaking we're looking at an even bigger conundrum. Setting aside the disputed "fructose is bad for you" theory, there are still quite a few facts that make sugars different from each other. Fructose has a lower glycemic index than any other monosaccharide (GI=19). That means it has a lower glycemic load and lighter impact on blood sugar levels following consumption. Glucose and maltose have extremely high glycemic indices, with glucose being the "reference" sugar at a GI=100. Low GI foods, such as many vegetables, legumes, nuts, and similar are therefore the food of choice for diabetics. White bread, potatoes, glucose, etc. are on the other side and bad foods for diabetics and have a much higher blood sugar impact when consumed by healthy adults. Table sugar (50/50 fructose and glucose) has a GI=65, honey and high fructose corn syrup which have the same glucose/fructose ratio of 45/55 have a GI=55. Fructose also promotes insulin resistance and has been anecdotally linked to the so-called metabolic syndrome and associated Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Your ordinary honey or HFCS sweetened coke won't very likely do this to you but I wouldn't have a breakfast of pure fructose on toast for more than a few weeks. Fructose promotes pr Continue reading >>

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Stumped by high fasting blood glucose results? Join the club. "It just doesn't compute. When I snack before bed, my fastings are lower than when I limit my night nibbles," says Pete Hyatt, 59, PWD type 2. "It's logical for people to point the finger for high fasting blood sugar numbers at what they eat between dinner and bed, but surprisingly food isn't the lead villain," says Robert Chilton, M.D., a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The true culprit is compromised hormonal control of blood glucose levels. The Essential Hormones During the years (up to a decade) that type 2 diabetes develops, the hormonal control of blood glucose breaks down. Four hormones are involved in glucose control: Insulin, made in the beta cells of the pancreas, helps the body use glucose from food by enabling glucose to move into the body's cells for energy. People with type 2 diabetes have slowly dwindling insulin reserves. Amylin, secreted from the beta cells, slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream after eating by slowing stomach-emptying and increasing the feeling of fullness. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are amylin-deficient. Incretins, a group of hormones secreted from the intestines that includes glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), enhance the body's release of insulin after eating. This in turn slows stomach-emptying, promotes fullness, delays the release of glucose into the bloodstream, and prevents the pancreas from releasing glucagon, putting less glucose into the blood. Glucagon, made in the alpha cells of the pancreas, breaks down glucose stored in the liver and muscles and releases it to provide energy when glucose from food isn't available. {C} How the Essential Hormones Work in the Body When d Continue reading >>

Spotlight On Sugar

Spotlight On Sugar

We encounter sugar in two different ways in our food: sugars that exist in unprocessed foods such as fruits, vegetables, and dairy products, and sugars that are added to packaged foods to boost flavor or allow food to be more shelf-stable. Added sugars are not chemically different from naturally occurring sugars. Both are broken down in the body using the same enzymatic processes. However, the amount and form in which we consume the sugars—in fruits and vegetables, in sodas, or in other processed foods—affects how quickly the body absorbs them, and how the body signals and experiences satiety, or feelings of fullness. Digestible carbohydrates, including “complex” starches and “simple” sugars, are all nutritionally similar in that they each provide 4 calories per gram. They are also chemically similar: more-complex carbohydrates have to be broken into simple sugars before they can be absorbed, transported by the bloodstream, and used for energy. Carbohydrate breakdown takes place high in the digestive tract, and with high efficiency. Starch is broken into glucose units and absorbed at about the same rate as pure glucose. Likewise, sucrose (a disaccharide made up of glucose paired with fructose) is clipped apart and absorbed about as quickly as high fructose corn syrup (a mixture of individual glucose and fructose units). Glucose and fructose have the same chemical formula: C6H12O6. But the atoms are arranged differently, giving the two sugars different chemical properties. The chemical structures of fructose and glucose influence their sweetness and how they are processed in the body. Sweetness Fructose tastes twice as sweet as glucose, and sucrose (composed of fructose and glucose linked together) is somewhere in between. The proportion of these sugars in fo Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Or Blood Glucose: What Does It Do?

Blood Sugar Or Blood Glucose: What Does It Do?

Blood sugar, or blood glucose, is sugar that the bloodstream carries to all the cells in the body to supply energy. Blood sugar or blood glucose measurements represent the amount of sugar being transported in the blood during one instant. The sugar comes from the food we eat. The human body regulates blood glucose levels so that they are neither too high nor too low. The blood's internal environment must remain stable for the body to function. This balance is known as homeostasis. The sugar in the blood is not the same as sucrose, the sugar in the sugar bowl. There are different kinds of sugar. Sugar in the blood is known as glucose. Blood glucose levels change throughout the day. After eating, levels rise and then settle down after about an hour. They are at their lowest point before the first meal of the day, which is normally breakfast. How does sugar get into the body's cells? When we eat carbohydrates, such as sugar, or sucrose, our body digests it into glucose, a simple sugar that can easily convert to energy. The human digestive system breaks down carbohydrates from food into various sugar molecules. One of these sugars is glucose, the body's main source of energy. The glucose goes straight from the digestive system into the bloodstream after food is consumed and digested. But glucose can only enter cells if there is insulin in the bloodstream too. Without insulin, the cells would starve. After we eat, blood sugar concentrations rise. The pancreas releases insulin automatically so that the glucose enters cells. As more and more cells receive glucose, blood sugar levels return to normal again. Excess glucose is stored as glycogen, or stored glucose, in the liver and the muscles. Glycogen plays an important role in homeostasis, because it helps our body function du Continue reading >>

Is Glucose Testing The Same As A Blood Sugar Test?

Is Glucose Testing The Same As A Blood Sugar Test?

Glucose testing is testing for glucose, semi-quantitative (-, +, ++, +++) or quantitatively (mg per deciliters, mmol/liter) in whatever fluid it is (in the old times semi-quantitatively in urine, a lot less often blood, nowadays primary blood, quantitative). Blood sugar test is a test on how much glucose there is in blood, so is a kind of glucose test. this things can be control by this . There are 3 major steps for this . Exercise Varying the locations where you inject insulin Now I will like to share a image for diet Continue reading >>

What Are The Pre-diabetes Symptoms?

What Are The Pre-diabetes Symptoms?

There’s good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn’t inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children’s blood sugar levels back to normal. The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat especially abdominal fat also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don’t process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead of doing its normal job of fueling the cells that make up muscles and other tissues. As insulin circulates, it allows sugar to enter your cells and lowers the amount of sugar in your bloodstream. As your blood sugar level drops, so does the secretion of insulin from your pancreas. When you have prediabetes, this process begins to work improperly. Instead of fueling your cells, sugar builds up in your bloodstream. High blood sugar occurs when your pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin or your cells become resistant to the action of insulin, or both. Continue reading >>

Understanding Glucose, Fructose, And Sucrose

Understanding Glucose, Fructose, And Sucrose

Considered the allies and enemies of many diabetics, glucose, fructose and sucrose are important carbohydrates. Although your tongue can't quite tell the difference between these simple sugars, they each play a different role in the body. People living with diabetes should pay especially close attention to glucose, which directly affects blood sugar levels. Here's what you should know about these three common carbohydrates. Glucose Glucose is the most the important simple sugar in our metabolism. It is the body's preferred energy source. Your body processes most of the carbohydrates you eat into glucose, whether to be used immediately for energy or to be stored in muscle cells or the liver as glycogen for later use. Glucose is measured in milligrams per deciliters and levels within the bloodstream naturally fluctuate throughout the day and night. Blood glucose generally becomes low between meals and during exercise. The hormone insulin is responsible for keeping blood sugar at a healthy level. Insulin converts sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Unlike fructose, high blood concentrations of glucose trigger the release of insulin. Type 2 diabetes In Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, the body either does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin properly, which doctors call insulin resistance. In the early stages of Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas produces extra insulin to compensate, but over time it isn't able to sustain the overproduction. At this point, it becomes difficult for the body to keep blood glucose at normal levels. Type 1 diabetes People with Type 1 diabetes produce little or no insulin. Only about 5 percent of people with diabetes have this form of the disease, which is usually associated with children and Continue reading >>

Is Low Blood Sugar Bad?

Is Low Blood Sugar Bad?

Causes of Low Blood Sugar Also known as Hypoglycemia or insulin shock, low blood sugar is defined as having glucose levels below 70 mg/dL. It often results as an overdose of diabetic medication or insulin intake along with erratic lifestyle leading to irregular meal intake. Who is at Risk of Low Blood Sugar? According to studies, people with type 2 diabetes are at a greater risk of low glucose levels in the blood and experience about 19 mild episodes and one severe episode of the condition during a year. Symptoms of Low Blood Sugar The following conditions are signs that your body in starving for sugar in order to function optimally. Immediately take the necessary precautions and remedies and contact your personalized healthcare professional from BeatO if you feel the following: • Shakiness • Nervousness or anxiety • Sweating, chills and clamminess • Irritability or impatience • Rapid/fast heartbeat • Hunger and nausea • Sleepiness • Blurred/impaired vision • Tingling or numbness in the lips or tongue • Headache • Weakness or fatigue • Lack of coordination • Seizures • Unconsciousness Immediate Cure for Low Blood Sugar Consuming the following easily digestible sources of carbohydrates is the fastest way to supply glucose demanded by your body. • Half a cup of juice or regular soda • 1 tablespoon of honey • 4 or 5 saltine crackers • 3 or 4 pieces of hard candy or glucose tablets • 1 tablespoon of sugar Left untreated for long, it can lead to an irreparable loss like coma and even death. The easiest way to keep track of your blood sugar pattern is to consistently self-monitor your glucose levels using a blood glucose monitor and be in regular touch with your healthcare professional. Continue reading >>

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Blood sugar (glucose) measurements are used to diagnose diabetes. They are also used to monitor glucose control for those people who are already known to have diabetes. Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If your glucose level remains high then you have diabetes. If the level goes too low then it is called hypoglycaemia. The main tests for measuring the amount of glucose in the blood are: Random blood glucose level. Fasting blood glucose level. The HbA1c blood test. Oral glucose tolerance test. Capillary blood glucose (home monitoring). Urine test for blood sugar (glucose). Blood tests for blood sugar (glucose) Random blood glucose level A sample of blood taken at any time can be a useful test if diabetes is suspected. A level of 11.1 mmol/L or more in the blood sample indicates that you have diabetes. A fasting blood glucose test may be done to confirm the diagnosis. Fasting blood glucose level Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Blood Sugar And Urine Sugar?

What Is The Difference Between Blood Sugar And Urine Sugar?

Glucose is a normal component of blood. The normal blood glucose levels are:- Fasting blood glucose level: 70-110 mg/dl Postprandial blood glucose level: up to 140 mg/dl But glucose is not a normal component of urine. Under normal physiological conditions, when blood glucose level is within normal limits, the urine does not contain any glucose. However, under pathologic conditions like diabetes mellitus, when blood sugar level crosses renal threshold (160-180 mg/100 ml), the blood glucose appears in urine. This condition is called glycosuria or glucosuria. Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes And Sugar

Difference Between Diabetes And Sugar

Key difference: Sugar is the generalized name for a class of chemically-related sweet-flavored substances, most of which are used as food. However, when relating to diabetes, sugar is often referring to blood sugar. The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) that is present in the blood. High Blood Sugar is a condition that at times may affect some people. If the blood sugar levels are often outside the normal range, it may be an indicator of a medical condition, such as Diabetes. Sugar is the generalized name for a class of chemically-related sweet-flavored substances, most of which are used as food. They are carbohydrates, composed of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. Simple sugars are called monosaccharides and include glucose (also known as dextrose), fructose and galactose. In fact nearly all foods have some type and level of sugar in them. However, when relating to diabetes, sugar is often referring to blood sugar. The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) that is present in the blood. When the body breaks down food, the sugars are broken down for use as energy by the body. The body mainly uses glucose for energy. The glucose is transported from the intestines or liver to body cells via the bloodstream. Here, a hormone makes the glucose available for cell absorption. The hormone is called insulin and is produced primarily in the pancreas. High Blood Sugar is a condition that at times may affect some people. The reason for high blood sugar is that either there isn’t enough insulin in the body or that the cells do not react as expected to the insulin. Both cases result in the cells not absorbing the glucose, hence increased levels of glucose in the bloodstream. It is the body’s tas Continue reading >>

What Are Normal Blood Glucose Levels?

What Are Normal Blood Glucose Levels?

If you get a physical every year, chances are that your doctor orders a blood test that will tell you, among other things, if your blood sugar level is “normal.” If it’s not, you may have diabetes, or be at risk for it in coming years. But what’s this strange thing called “normal” anyway? There’s two main ways to measure blood glucose, depending on where you’re located. If you’re in Europe: In Europe, blood sugar is measured using millimoles per litre. A “normal” blood glucose level comes in at around 4 – 7 mmol/L or 4 – 8 mmol/L for a child with Type 1 diabetes before meals. Two hours after a meal, a normal blood sugar range should be under 9 mmol/L for people with T1D. For T2D, the upper range is slightly lower at 8.5 mmol/L. You can find additional information on the Diabetes UK website. If you’re in the US: The clinical definition puts “normal” blood glucose at 70-120 mg/dL (milligrams per decilitre) if you’ve fasted eight to twelve hours, or 70-160 mg/dL if you did not fast. That probably makes perfect sense if you have “M.D.” after your name. If you don’t, here’s the translation: 70 to 120 milligrams per deciliter. Clear as … uh…. blood, right? Don’t worry, it’s just the mathematics of measuring density. Here’s an easier way to remember ideal levels, courtesy of doctor Mehmet Oz: Optimal blood glucose is less than 100 after a fast, less than 125 if you weren’t fasting. But even then, remember, glucose levels are like the tide, constantly ebbing and flowing, depending on when – and what – we last ate. What is blood glucose anyway? Blood glucose means the same thing as blood sugar. But ironically enough, the amount of sugars coursing through our blood is not based on our intake of sugar, but how many carbohyd Continue reading >>

Why Meters Can't Tell Us Our Blood Sugar Levels

Why Meters Can't Tell Us Our Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes advocate and author Riva Greenberg has been on a "meter accuracy kick" lately — researching the heck out of this controversial topic. Very timely considering I've been seeing loads of expensive TV ads for Accu-Chek's new Nano meter, claiming that it's "23% more accurate" (!) Riva recently published a piece at the Huffington Post on why meter accuracy is both less, and more, critical than you might think. Truth is, she tells us, meter accuracy is only one part of a much larger story. A Guest Post by Riva Greenberg After being lucky enough to receive an iBGStar meter from Sanofi the day before its launch, I ran a few comparison tests between it and the Bayer Contour USB, which I'd been using the past two years, and discovered that the iBGStar consistently gave me a reading 20-25 points higher. So I took out all my meters. There were several, (Sanofi studies show most people use 4 meters on average) and I even ordered two new free meters from FreeStyle. I checked my blood sugar several times on my collection of 7 meters (some think I was a little obsessed) and saw it was rare when two meters gave me the same number! Given that I feel like my meter is my lifeline, I wanted to find out how meters work and why different meters give different results. I talked with a number of Chief Medical Officers, MDs and Medical Safety Officers at several meter manufacturers and I'm going to tell you what I learned in layman's terms. To better understand the science behind meter and strip technology, you can google "meter accuracy" for white papers and posts that would delight even the geekiest engineer. To better know how accurate your own meter is (in percentage terms), you can "check the package insert that comes with the strips and look online at prescribing information," sa Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Vs Insulin: What’s The Difference?

Blood Sugar Vs Insulin: What’s The Difference?

Hello everyone, it’s Butter Bob. And this video is about the difference between blood sugar and insulin. Many times, I get notes from people saying, “my insulin is good, I test it after I eat.” But, I have to write back to them and say, and a lot of you know this already, but stick around, even if you know this, stick around, because you might learn something from this video. I write back to them and I’ll say, “You know, you can’t probably know what your insulin level is after you eat. What you’re testing is blood sugar and blood sugar and insulin are two very different things. They’re not always synonymous with each other.” They don’t always match each other, in fact, they don’t match each other, very often. For a lot of people. And that’s what this video is really about. This is a complex issue and I’ve wanted to do a video on it for a long time. But, trying to find a way to talk about this, that is understandable and that will mean something to you, in you practical everyday life, is something that I’m always concerned with. My Insulin Test In October of 2015, I took an insulin test, to test my insulin levels. Both when I’m fasted and after I took a glucose load, of just pure sugar. To see what would happen with my insulin levels. Kraft Prediabetes Test This test is called the Kraft Prediabetes Test, and It’s a bloodspot test that you can order from a company called Meridian Valley Lab. Now, I’m not promoting Meridian Valley Lab, I do not receive any money from them for this channel or anything else, but I have used them and I always limit what I say on this channel to something I have done myself and that I know has results that I can depend on, so I can pass those on to you. Testing Blood Sugar is Easy Listen guys, blood sugar is s Continue reading >>

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