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Are Blood Sugar And Glucose The Same

Blood Sugar Vs Insulin: What’s The Difference?

Blood Sugar Vs Insulin: What’s The Difference?

Hello everyone, it’s Butter Bob. And this video is about the difference between blood sugar and insulin. Many times, I get notes from people saying, “my insulin is good, I test it after I eat.” But, I have to write back to them and say, and a lot of you know this already, but stick around, even if you know this, stick around, because you might learn something from this video. I write back to them and I’ll say, “You know, you can’t probably know what your insulin level is after you eat. What you’re testing is blood sugar and blood sugar and insulin are two very different things. They’re not always synonymous with each other.” They don’t always match each other, in fact, they don’t match each other, very often. For a lot of people. And that’s what this video is really about. This is a complex issue and I’ve wanted to do a video on it for a long time. But, trying to find a way to talk about this, that is understandable and that will mean something to you, in you practical everyday life, is something that I’m always concerned with. My Insulin Test In October of 2015, I took an insulin test, to test my insulin levels. Both when I’m fasted and after I took a glucose load, of just pure sugar. To see what would happen with my insulin levels. Kraft Prediabetes Test This test is called the Kraft Prediabetes Test, and It’s a bloodspot test that you can order from a company called Meridian Valley Lab. Now, I’m not promoting Meridian Valley Lab, I do not receive any money from them for this channel or anything else, but I have used them and I always limit what I say on this channel to something I have done myself and that I know has results that I can depend on, so I can pass those on to you. Testing Blood Sugar is Easy Listen guys, blood sugar is s Continue reading >>

Why Meters Can't Tell Us Our Blood Sugar Levels

Why Meters Can't Tell Us Our Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes advocate and author Riva Greenberg has been on a "meter accuracy kick" lately — researching the heck out of this controversial topic. Very timely considering I've been seeing loads of expensive TV ads for Accu-Chek's new Nano meter, claiming that it's "23% more accurate" (!) Riva recently published a piece at the Huffington Post on why meter accuracy is both less, and more, critical than you might think. Truth is, she tells us, meter accuracy is only one part of a much larger story. A Guest Post by Riva Greenberg After being lucky enough to receive an iBGStar meter from Sanofi the day before its launch, I ran a few comparison tests between it and the Bayer Contour USB, which I'd been using the past two years, and discovered that the iBGStar consistently gave me a reading 20-25 points higher. So I took out all my meters. There were several, (Sanofi studies show most people use 4 meters on average) and I even ordered two new free meters from FreeStyle. I checked my blood sugar several times on my collection of 7 meters (some think I was a little obsessed) and saw it was rare when two meters gave me the same number! Given that I feel like my meter is my lifeline, I wanted to find out how meters work and why different meters give different results. I talked with a number of Chief Medical Officers, MDs and Medical Safety Officers at several meter manufacturers and I'm going to tell you what I learned in layman's terms. To better understand the science behind meter and strip technology, you can google "meter accuracy" for white papers and posts that would delight even the geekiest engineer. To better know how accurate your own meter is (in percentage terms), you can "check the package insert that comes with the strips and look online at prescribing information," sa Continue reading >>

Is Low Blood Sugar Bad?

Is Low Blood Sugar Bad?

Causes of Low Blood Sugar Also known as Hypoglycemia or insulin shock, low blood sugar is defined as having glucose levels below 70 mg/dL. It often results as an overdose of diabetic medication or insulin intake along with erratic lifestyle leading to irregular meal intake. Who is at Risk of Low Blood Sugar? According to studies, people with type 2 diabetes are at a greater risk of low glucose levels in the blood and experience about 19 mild episodes and one severe episode of the condition during a year. Symptoms of Low Blood Sugar The following conditions are signs that your body in starving for sugar in order to function optimally. Immediately take the necessary precautions and remedies and contact your personalized healthcare professional from BeatO if you feel the following: • Shakiness • Nervousness or anxiety • Sweating, chills and clamminess • Irritability or impatience • Rapid/fast heartbeat • Hunger and nausea • Sleepiness • Blurred/impaired vision • Tingling or numbness in the lips or tongue • Headache • Weakness or fatigue • Lack of coordination • Seizures • Unconsciousness Immediate Cure for Low Blood Sugar Consuming the following easily digestible sources of carbohydrates is the fastest way to supply glucose demanded by your body. • Half a cup of juice or regular soda • 1 tablespoon of honey • 4 or 5 saltine crackers • 3 or 4 pieces of hard candy or glucose tablets • 1 tablespoon of sugar Left untreated for long, it can lead to an irreparable loss like coma and even death. The easiest way to keep track of your blood sugar pattern is to consistently self-monitor your glucose levels using a blood glucose monitor and be in regular touch with your healthcare professional. Continue reading >>

Questions And Answers About Fructose

Questions And Answers About Fructose

What is fructose? Fructose is a monosaccharide, or single sugar, that has the same chemical formula as glucose but a different molecular structure. Sometimes called fruit sugar, fructose is found in fruit, some vegetables, honey, and other plants. Fructose and other sugars are carbohydrates, an important source of energy for the body. What other types of sugars are there? The food supply contains a variety of sugars called monosaccharides (single sugar units like fructose and glucose) and disaccharides (two monosaccharides linked together). Glucose is the main source of energy for the body because most complex sugars and carbohydrates break down into glucose during digestion. Starches contain many single sugar units linked together. The various sugars perform different functions in the body, but they all can provide energy. Sucrose is a disaccharide that contains equal parts of glucose and fructose. Known as table or white sugar, sucrose is found naturally in sugar cane and sugar beets. Other sugars in foods and beverages include: Lactose Disaccharide containing glucose and galactose Naturally occurring in milk Maltose Disaccharide containing two glucoses Crystallized from starch Dextrose Another name for glucose Crystallized from sugar cane, sugar beets and starches Corn Syrup Primarily single glucose units Produced from corn starch High Fructose Corn Syrup Primarily a mixture of glucose and fructose single units Produced from corn starch Is fructose safe? High fructose corn syrup and all other sugars are “generally recognized as safe” by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Surgeon General's Report on Nutrition and Health, the National Academy of Sciences report Diet and Health, and Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objec Continue reading >>

What Are The Pre-diabetes Symptoms?

What Are The Pre-diabetes Symptoms?

There’s good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn’t inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children’s blood sugar levels back to normal. The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat especially abdominal fat also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don’t process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead of doing its normal job of fueling the cells that make up muscles and other tissues. As insulin circulates, it allows sugar to enter your cells and lowers the amount of sugar in your bloodstream. As your blood sugar level drops, so does the secretion of insulin from your pancreas. When you have prediabetes, this process begins to work improperly. Instead of fueling your cells, sugar builds up in your bloodstream. High blood sugar occurs when your pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin or your cells become resistant to the action of insulin, or both. Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes And Sugar

Difference Between Diabetes And Sugar

Key difference: Sugar is the generalized name for a class of chemically-related sweet-flavored substances, most of which are used as food. However, when relating to diabetes, sugar is often referring to blood sugar. The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) that is present in the blood. High Blood Sugar is a condition that at times may affect some people. If the blood sugar levels are often outside the normal range, it may be an indicator of a medical condition, such as Diabetes. Sugar is the generalized name for a class of chemically-related sweet-flavored substances, most of which are used as food. They are carbohydrates, composed of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. Simple sugars are called monosaccharides and include glucose (also known as dextrose), fructose and galactose. In fact nearly all foods have some type and level of sugar in them. However, when relating to diabetes, sugar is often referring to blood sugar. The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) that is present in the blood. When the body breaks down food, the sugars are broken down for use as energy by the body. The body mainly uses glucose for energy. The glucose is transported from the intestines or liver to body cells via the bloodstream. Here, a hormone makes the glucose available for cell absorption. The hormone is called insulin and is produced primarily in the pancreas. High Blood Sugar is a condition that at times may affect some people. The reason for high blood sugar is that either there isn’t enough insulin in the body or that the cells do not react as expected to the insulin. Both cases result in the cells not absorbing the glucose, hence increased levels of glucose in the bloodstream. It is the body’s tas Continue reading >>

How Is Insulin Related To Blood Sugar?

How Is Insulin Related To Blood Sugar?

The body works almost like a thermostat. When there is too much glucose in the blood, insulin is released and reduces the amount of glucose in the blood. Then, when glucose levels drop, insulin is no longer secreted. The body balances the amount of insulin and glucose to keep glucose at a fairly even level throughout the day. It keeps a little bit of insulin ready to go to work at a moment’s notice. For meals, it releases the right amount of extra insulin in time to clear glucose from the blood before the glucose levels climb too high. In two words: inversely proportional. Picture insulin and blood sugar like two children on a teeter-totter on a playground. By moving forward or backwards on the balance beam, the two children can both hover above the ground, even if they don’t weigh the same. Likewise, in your body, if the blood sugar goes up, the body releases insulin from the pancreas. Insulin moves sugar from the blood where it really does very little good, into your cells, which all use sugar for food. When blood sugar drops the body stops releasing insulin. If the blood sugar drops too much, the liver will release some sugar to balance things out. If you take too much of some diabetes meds, like insulin or a class of drugs called the sulfonylureas, your blood sugar can go very much too low, more than the liver can handle. A low blood sugar can be life threatening, and is treated simply by adding sugar to the system to “soak up” the extra insulin. If you have a low blood sugar, which is called hypoglycemia, drinking half a regular soda, or eating several hard candies can give you enough sugar to restore balance. Insulin is a hormone normally produced by the pancreas in response to blood sugar, which is sugar from digested foods circulating in the bloodstream. Continue reading >>

"huge" Differences Even Though People Ate The Same Foods

Do we all respond to a tomato in the same way? Or any food for that matter? Scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, suspected that we don't, so they set out to explore the issue. They decided to look at blood sugar levels after people ate, called postprandial blood glucose levels, to see if they varied from one individual to another after eating the same meals. Elevated blood glucose levels are a major risk factor for diabetes and obesity, which are epidemic. They found a wide variance in how the same foods affected different people. "The huge differences that we found in the rise of blood sugar levels among different people who consumed identical meals highlights why personalized eating choices are more likely to help people stay healthy than universal dietary advice," co-author Eran Segal, with the department of Computer Science and Applied Math at Weizmann, said during a press conference. The authors, who published their findings Thursday in the journal Cell, collected data on 800 study participants (who did not have diabetes, though some had prediabetes) using health questionnaires, body measurements, blood tests, glucose monitoring, stool samples, and a mobile app to report lifestyle and food intake. Data on almost 46,900 meals were measured altogether. The participants wore glucose monitors which continuously measured their glucose levels every five minutes for the entire week of the study, Segal said. They ate a standardized breakfast each morning and entered all of their meals into the mobile app food diary. Afterward, the researchers provided the participants with an analysis of their personalized responses to the food they ate. The scientists reported that age and body mass index (BMI) were associated with blood glucose levels after Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

How often should I test my blood sugar? This is a very common question, and the answer isn't the same for everyone. In general, you should test as often as you need to get helpful information. There's no point in testing if the information you get doesn't help you manage your diabetes. If you've been told to test at certain times, but you don't know why or what to do with the test results, then testing won't seem very meaningful. Here are some general guidelines for deciding how often to test: If you can only test once a day, then do it before breakfast. Keep a written record so that you can see the pattern of the numbers. If you control your blood sugar by diet and exercise only, this once-a-day test might be enough. If you take medicine (diabetes pills or insulin), you will probably want to know how well that medicine is working. The general rule is to test before meals and keep a record. If you want to know how your meals affect your blood sugar, testing about 2 hours after eating can be helpful. Test whenever you feel your blood sugar is either too high or too low. Testing will give you important information about what you need to do to raise or lower your blood sugar. If you take more than 2 insulin shots a day or use an insulin pump, you should test 4 to 6 times a day. You should test more often if you're having unusually high or low readings, if you're sick, under more stress than usual, or are pregnant. If you change your schedule or travel, you should also test your blood sugar more often than usual. Talk to a member of your health care team about how often to test based on your personal care plan. What should my test numbers be? There isn't one blood sugar target that's right for everyone with diabetes. It's important to work with your health care team to set Continue reading >>

Spotlight On Sugar

Spotlight On Sugar

We encounter sugar in two different ways in our food: sugars that exist in unprocessed foods such as fruits, vegetables, and dairy products, and sugars that are added to packaged foods to boost flavor or allow food to be more shelf-stable. Added sugars are not chemically different from naturally occurring sugars. Both are broken down in the body using the same enzymatic processes. However, the amount and form in which we consume the sugars—in fruits and vegetables, in sodas, or in other processed foods—affects how quickly the body absorbs them, and how the body signals and experiences satiety, or feelings of fullness. Digestible carbohydrates, including “complex” starches and “simple” sugars, are all nutritionally similar in that they each provide 4 calories per gram. They are also chemically similar: more-complex carbohydrates have to be broken into simple sugars before they can be absorbed, transported by the bloodstream, and used for energy. Carbohydrate breakdown takes place high in the digestive tract, and with high efficiency. Starch is broken into glucose units and absorbed at about the same rate as pure glucose. Likewise, sucrose (a disaccharide made up of glucose paired with fructose) is clipped apart and absorbed about as quickly as high fructose corn syrup (a mixture of individual glucose and fructose units). Glucose and fructose have the same chemical formula: C6H12O6. But the atoms are arranged differently, giving the two sugars different chemical properties. The chemical structures of fructose and glucose influence their sweetness and how they are processed in the body. Sweetness Fructose tastes twice as sweet as glucose, and sucrose (composed of fructose and glucose linked together) is somewhere in between. The proportion of these sugars in fo Continue reading >>

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Stumped by high fasting blood glucose results? Join the club. "It just doesn't compute. When I snack before bed, my fastings are lower than when I limit my night nibbles," says Pete Hyatt, 59, PWD type 2. "It's logical for people to point the finger for high fasting blood sugar numbers at what they eat between dinner and bed, but surprisingly food isn't the lead villain," says Robert Chilton, M.D., a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The true culprit is compromised hormonal control of blood glucose levels. The Essential Hormones During the years (up to a decade) that type 2 diabetes develops, the hormonal control of blood glucose breaks down. Four hormones are involved in glucose control: Insulin, made in the beta cells of the pancreas, helps the body use glucose from food by enabling glucose to move into the body's cells for energy. People with type 2 diabetes have slowly dwindling insulin reserves. Amylin, secreted from the beta cells, slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream after eating by slowing stomach-emptying and increasing the feeling of fullness. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are amylin-deficient. Incretins, a group of hormones secreted from the intestines that includes glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), enhance the body's release of insulin after eating. This in turn slows stomach-emptying, promotes fullness, delays the release of glucose into the bloodstream, and prevents the pancreas from releasing glucagon, putting less glucose into the blood. Glucagon, made in the alpha cells of the pancreas, breaks down glucose stored in the liver and muscles and releases it to provide energy when glucose from food isn't available. {C} How the Essential Hormones Work in the Body When d Continue reading >>

Does Your Body Process 200g Of Sugar The Same Way If You Ingest That Quantity In 5 Minutes Or Throughout The Whole Day?

Does Your Body Process 200g Of Sugar The Same Way If You Ingest That Quantity In 5 Minutes Or Throughout The Whole Day?

No. If you consume small amount throughout the day, sugar will either be used as instant energy or it will be taken up by liver to synthesize glycogen. If you consume 200 grams at once,and if all of that is absorbed, there will be release of large amount of insulin to maintain blood sugar level within normal range. 200g is too much for liver to take up. Given that insulin promotes formation of adipose tissue, rest of the sugar will be stored in body as fat. If blood sugar level exceeds renal threshold for glucose- 200 mg/dl, then glucose will be excreted in urine. some additional information on role of insulin and glucagon in regulation of blood sugar level: blood sugar level in body is maintained within narrow range. Any rise in blood sugar level causes release of insulin within few minutes which will mobilize this sugar in tissues and blood sugar level is again brought down to normal resting level. As the blood sugar level decreases in blood,insulin secretion also decreases simultaneously. See the following diagram for better understanding. A number of other hormones influence blood sugar level. All hormones increase it except insulin.(and insulin like growth factor). Continue reading >>

7 Blood Sugar Testing Mistakes To Avoid

7 Blood Sugar Testing Mistakes To Avoid

1 / 8 Understand Diabetes Testing If you have diabetes, it's imperative that you learn to effectively self-test your blood sugar to keep your glucose levels in check. For example, results from a study of more than 5,000 people living with diabetes showed that even those people who don't take medication for diabetes have better blood sugar control if they test regularly. The study participants' risk of early kidney damage, strokes, and death from diabetes-related causes was also reduced by one-third. Of course, the accuracy of your results is tied to the accuracy of your checking — and to your understanding of what all the numbers mean. "The most important point to me is that people are learning something from checking their blood sugar," says Sacha Uelmen, RDN, CDE, director of nutrition for the American Diabetes Association. "Don't just look at those numbers, write them down, and move on. If you have diabetes, take an active role in your health." To get the most useful readings, learn these common blood sugar testing mistakes and how to avoid them. Continue reading >>

Are All Sugars The Same?

Are All Sugars The Same?

Not really. First, all sugars are somewhat different, chemically. Simple sugars (monosaccharides) such as fructose, galactose, glucose, xylose, and ribose - to make matters more complicated - all can assume one of a number of structures and still be considered fructose or galactose. Once two monosaccharides meet it gets even more complicated. There's sucrose which is fructose and glucose (found in honey, table sugar, high fructose corn syrup, etc.), lactulose (galactose and fructose), lactose (galactose and glucose), and more. Metabolically speaking we're looking at an even bigger conundrum. Setting aside the disputed "fructose is bad for you" theory, there are still quite a few facts that make sugars different from each other. Fructose has a lower glycemic index than any other monosaccharide (GI=19). That means it has a lower glycemic load and lighter impact on blood sugar levels following consumption. Glucose and maltose have extremely high glycemic indices, with glucose being the "reference" sugar at a GI=100. Low GI foods, such as many vegetables, legumes, nuts, and similar are therefore the food of choice for diabetics. White bread, potatoes, glucose, etc. are on the other side and bad foods for diabetics and have a much higher blood sugar impact when consumed by healthy adults. Table sugar (50/50 fructose and glucose) has a GI=65, honey and high fructose corn syrup which have the same glucose/fructose ratio of 45/55 have a GI=55. Fructose also promotes insulin resistance and has been anecdotally linked to the so-called metabolic syndrome and associated Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Your ordinary honey or HFCS sweetened coke won't very likely do this to you but I wouldn't have a breakfast of pure fructose on toast for more than a few weeks. Fructose promotes pr Continue reading >>

High Blood Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

High Blood Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

What is high blood glucose? People who do not have diabetes typically have fasting plasma blood glucose levels that run under 100 mg/dl. Your physician will define for you what your target blood glucose should be — identifying a blood glucose target that is as close to normal as possible that you can safely achieve given your overall medical health. In general, high blood glucose, also called 'hyperglycemia', is considered "high" when it is 160 mg/dl or above your individual blood glucose target. Be sure to ask your healthcare provider what he or she thinks is a safe target for you for blood glucose before and after meals. If your blood glucose runs high for long periods of time, this can pose significant problems for you long-term — increased risk of complications, such as eye disease, kidney disease, heart attacks and strokes and more. High blood glucose can pose health problems in the short-term as well. Your treatment plan may need adjustment if the blood glucose stays over 180 mg/dl for 3 days in a row. It is important to aim to keep your blood glucose under control, and treat hyperglycemia when it occurs. What are the symptoms of high blood glucose? Increased thirst Increased urination Dry mouth or skin Tiredness or fatigue Blurred vision More frequent infections Slow healing cuts and sores Unexplained weight loss What causes high blood glucose? Too much food Too little exercise or physical activity Skipped or not enough diabetes pills or insulin Insulin that has spoiled after being exposed to extreme heat or freezing cold Stress, illness, infection, injury or surgery A blood glucose meter that is not reading accurately What should you do for high blood glucose? Be sure to drink plenty of water. It is recommended to drink a minimum of 8 glasses each day. If yo Continue reading >>

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