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Ano Ang Normal Na Blood Sugar

Glucose Test

Glucose Test

Testing blood sugar levels A glucose test is a type of blood test used to determine the amount of glucose in the blood. It is mainly used in screening for prediabetes or diabetes.[1] Patients are instructed not to consume anything but water during the fasting period. Caffeine will also distort the results. If the person eats during the period in which he or she is supposed to have been fasting then they may show blood sugar levels that may cause his or her doctor to think the person has or is at increased risk of having diabetes. In people already having diabetes, blood glucose monitoring is used with frequent intervals in the management of the condition.[1] There are several different kinds of glucose tests: Fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting plasma glucose (FPG): 8 or 12 or 14 hours after eating Glucose tolerance test:[2] continuous testing Postprandial glucose test (PC): 2 hours after eating Random glucose test Reference ranges[edit] Fasting blood sugar[edit] A range of 4 to 5.5 mmol/l (70 to 99 mg/dl) before a meal is normal. Continual fasting levels of 5.5 to 7 mmol/l (101–125 mg/dl) causes concern of possible prediabetes and may be worth monitoring. 7 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) and above means a risk of diabetes.[3] After a 12‑hour fast, a range of 3.9 to under 5.5 mmol/l (70.2 to 100 mg/dl) is normal; a level of 5.6 to under 7 mmol/l (100 to 126 mg/dl) is considered a sign of prediabetes.[3] Postprandial glucose[edit] Main article: Postprandial glucose test A level of < 7.8 mmol/l (140 mg/dl) 90 minutes after a meal is normal.[4] See also[edit] Glucose meter Hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia [edit] Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) present in the blood of a human or an animal. The body naturally tightly regulates blood glucose levels (with the help of insulin that is secreted by pancreas) as a part of metabolic homeostasis. If blood sugar levels are either increased or decreased by a greater margin than expected this might indicate a medical condition. Diabetic patients must monitor their blood sugar levels as body’s inability to properly utilize and / or produce insulin can pose a serious threat to their health. Navigation: Definition: What is blood sugar? What is diabetes? Diagnosis: Diabetes symptoms Levels and indication Normal blood sugar levels Low blood sugar levels High blood sugar levels Managing: How to lower blood sugar level? Children blood sugar levels Blood sugar levels chart Checking for BS: How to check blood sugar? Treatment: How to lower blood sugar level? Can diabetes be cured? Accessories Diabetic Socks Diabetic Shoes What is blood sugar? What does it mean when someone refers to blood sugar level in your body? Blood sugar level (or blood sugar concentration) is the amount of glucose (a source of energy) present in your blood at any given time. A normal blood glucose level for a healthy person is somewhere between 72 mg/dL (3.8 to 4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (5.8 to 6 mmol/L). It, of course, depends on every individual alone. Blood sugar levels might fluctuate due to other reasons (such as exercise, stress and infection). Typically blood sugar level in humans is around 72 mg/dL (or 4 mmol/L). After a meal the blood sugar level may increase temporarily up to 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L). This is normal. A blood sugar level between 72 mg/dL (4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (6 mmol/L) is considered normal for a h Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Converter

Blood Sugar Converter

Tweet Convert blood sugar/glucose from mmol/L (UK standard) to mg/dL (US standard) and vice versa using our blood sugar converter. Whats the difference between mmol/L and mg/dL? Both sets of units are used to measure blood sugar levels and both give a measurement of the concentration of glucose in the blood, albeit in slightly different ways. mmol/L gives the molarity, which is the number of molecules of a substance within a specified volume, in this case within 1 litre. mg/dL gives the concentration by the ratio of weight to volume, in this case milligrams per decilitre. mmol/L is the most common measurement used in the UK with mg/dL predominantly used in the USA and continental Europe. Blood glucose typically varies from 4 mmol/L to 6 mmol/L for people without diabetes. Blood sugar (also called blood glucose) needs to be tightly controlled in the human body to minimise the risk of complications developing. Formula to calculate mmol/l from mg/dl: mmol/l = mg/dl / 18 Formula to calculate mg/dl from mmol/l: mg/dl = 18 × mmol/l Can I change the units given by my blood glucose meter? This can depend on which blood glucose meter you have. Some meters allow you to change the units from mg/dL to mmol/L and vice versa whether some meters are only set up to display one set of units. Check the meter’s manual for whether it is possible to change the units. If you don’t have or cannot find the manual, contact the manufacturer. Why are blood sugar levels important? Measuring blood sugar levels and understanding what your glucose levels should be is an essential part of diabetes treatment for many people with diabetes. Blood sugar level refers to the total amount of glucose circulating in the blood. In different parts of the world, different units for measuring blood glucose ar Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often appear suddenly and are often the reason for checking blood sugar levels. Because symptoms of other types of diabetes and prediabetes come on more gradually or may not be evident, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended screening guidelines. The ADA recommends that the following people be screened for diabetes: Anyone with a body mass index higher than 25, regardless of age, who has additional risk factors, such as high blood pressure, a sedentary lifestyle, a history of polycystic ovary syndrome, having delivered a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds, a history of diabetes in pregnancy, high cholesterol levels, a history of heart disease, and having a close relative with diabetes. Anyone older than age 45 is advised to receive an initial blood sugar screening, and then, if the results are normal, to be screened every three years thereafter. Tests for type 1 and type 2 diabetes and prediabetes Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates that you have diabetes. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates prediabetes. Below 5.7 is considered normal. If the A1C test results aren't consistent, the test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels In Toddlers

Blood Sugar Levels In Toddlers

Most toddlers are pint-sized bundles of energy that never seem to stop moving. You are used to your child's extreme moods: the highs that occur after a period of excitement like a birthday party, and the cranky low times when your toddler needs a snack or a nap. Many of these whims and moods can be associated with your tot's blood sugar levels. Children of all ages can experience periods of high and low blood sugar levels. Some of the fluctuations are normal; others might indicate diabetes. Video of the Day Your toddler's blood sugar levels are measured through a blood test. Tests may be random, taken at a routine well-child checkup or at another time if your pediatrician is concerned about the possibility of diabetes. Random blood tests do not require your toddler to fast; normal results are those that read under 200 mg/dL. A fasting glucose test requires you to take your toddler for a blood draw after an overnight fast, before he has eaten breakfast in the morning. Normal blood sugar levels for a fasting test range between 100 and 125 mg/dL. Readings higher than 125 may indicate that your child has diabetes. Feeding your toddler healthy meals and snacks on a regular schedule can help regulate the blood sugar fluctuations that, while normal to a degree, can rev your child up or lead to a "crash and burn" situation. Foods high in sugar can give your toddler a boost of energy, along with a spike in glucose levels. The energetic phase ends sometimes abruptly and from the parent's point of view, somewhat catastrophically when your child is exhausted, hungry and irritable. Incorporating whole grains and fiber into your toddler's diet can help keep blood sugar levels more even after eating. Fruits, vegetables, whole grain pastas, rices and breads and lean proteins can help a Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Is Stable

Blood Sugar Is Stable

Acrobat PDF file can be downloaded here. Who has not heard people say "my blood sugar is low, I need a Cola" or something like that. We all "know" that if our blood sugar level falls we feel weak, confused and have difficulty thinking. For some of my students a candy bar or a bottle of soda is almost indispensable to come through an examination! However, the facts are: A stable blood glucose level is absolutely essential for normal brain function. The brain can only use glucose or ketone bodies as its fuel. Ketone bodies (acetyl acetate or ß-hydroxybutyrate) cannot replace glucose as the brain's energy source on short notice. About 10-14 days are required to increase plasma ketone body levels such that they can provide energy for neural tissues. At most they can provide about 50% of the brain's energy, the rest must come from glucose. Blood sugar levels are usually between 4.5 to 5.5 mmoles/l and swing about 10-15% around these values. We do not normally experience low blood sugar levels. Hypoglycemia does ram some few people including persons with diabetes who have not eaten after taking insulin, others with insulin-producing tumors, newborn with untreated galactosemia, some alcohol-poisoned people, athletes who exceed their capacity in a competition and others with a variety of liver diseases. For most of us (relatively healthy and normally active persons), low blood sugar just does not happen. Most nutritionists recommend a diet in which between 50 and 60 % of the caloric content is contributed by carbohydrates. However, we can exist quite well on diets containing with little or no carbohydrate. Low starch and sugar intake does not reduce blood sugar levels: we maintain normal blood glucose levels in spite of large variations in sugar and starch consumption. The key Continue reading >>

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Hi, I just found this site and would like to participate. I will give my numbers, etc. First, my last A1c was 6.1, the doc said it was Pre-diabetes in January of 2014, OK, I get it that part, but what confuses me is that at home, on my glucometer, all my fastings were “Normal” however, back then, I had not checked after meals, so maybe they were the culprits. Now, I am checking all the time and driving myself crazy. In the morning sometimes fasting is 95 and other times 85, it varies day to day. Usually, after a low carb meal, it drops to the 80’s the first hour and lower the second. On some days, when I am naughty and eat wrong, my b/s sugar is still low, and on other days, I can eat the same thing, and it goes sky high, again, not consistent. Normally, however, since February, my fbs is 90, 1 hour after, 120, 2nd hour, back to 90, but, that changes as well. In February, of 2014, on the 5th, it was horrible. I think I had eaten Lasagne, well, before, my sugars did not change much, but that night, WHAM-O I started at 80 before the meal, I forgot to take it at the one and two hour mark, but did at the 3 hour mark, it was 175, then at four hours, down to 160, then at 5 hours, back to 175. I went to bed, because by that time, it was 2 AM, but when I woke up at 8:00 and took it, it was back to 89!!!! This horrible ordeal has only happened once, but, I have gone up to 178 since, but come down to normal in 2 hours. I don’t know if I was extra stressed that day or what, I am under tons of it, my marriage is not good, my dear dad died 2 years ago and my very best friend died 7 months ago, I live in a strange country, I am from America, but moved to New Zealand last year, and I am soooo unhappy. Anyway, what does confuse me is why the daily differences, even though I may Continue reading >>

How To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

How To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

If you are one of the millions of people who has prediabetes, diabetes, metabolic syndrome or any other form of “insulin resistance,” maintaining normal blood sugar levels can be challenging. Over the past several decades, these chronic disorders have swept through the U.S. and many other nations, reaching epidemic proportions and causing serious, but often preventable, side effects like nerve damage, fatigue, loss of vision, arterial damage and weight gain. Elevated blood sugar levels maintained for an extended period of time can push someone who is “prediabetic” into having full-blown diabetes (which now affects about one in every three adults in the U.S.). (1) Even for people who aren’t necessarily at a high risk for developing diabetes or heart complications, poorly managed blood sugar can lead to common complications, including fatigue, weight gain and sugar cravings. In extreme cases, elevated blood sugar can even contribute to strokes, amputations, coma and death in people with a history of insulin resistance. Blood sugar is raised by glucose, which is the sugar we get from eating many different types of foods that contain carbohydrates. Although we usually think of normal blood sugar as being strictly reliant upon how many carbohydrates and added sugar someone eats, other factors also play a role. For example, stress can elevate cortisol levels, which interferes with how insulin is used, and the timing of meals can also affect how the body manages blood sugar. (2) What can you do to help avoid dangerous blood sugar swings and lower diabetes symptoms? As you’ll learn, normal blood sugar levels are sustained through a combination of eating a balanced, low-processed diet, getting regular exercise and managing the body’s most important hormones in othe Continue reading >>

How To Control Diabetes: 10 Tips To Maintain Blood Sugar Level

How To Control Diabetes: 10 Tips To Maintain Blood Sugar Level

Living a diabetic life is a challenge. You need to constantly monitor your diet and ensure that your blood sugar level is well under control. One of the major diseases affecting millions and millions of people in the country today, diabetes is life-long and deadly. It is a condition when the hormone called insulin that is produced by the pancreas is unable to break down glucose into energy, and as such, the blood sugar level increases in the body. What one eats plays a crucial role for diabetics, and monitoring it constantly along with following regular meal schedule ca help tremendously. Physical activity is a must too to ensure that insulin is utilized by the body. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes and looking for all sorts of ways to keep a check on your blood sugar level, here are some common and uncommon tips that can help you - 1. Lose Those Extra Kilos According to Dr. Shashank Joshi, Endocrinologist, Lilavati & Bhatia Hospital, "Being overweight causes insulin resistance and makes it difficult for the body to maintain appropriate blood glucose levels. For those who are overweight, dropping 5- 10 per cent of your weight can help. Work with your doctor to manage your weight and if necessary consult a dietician." 2. Follow a Balanced Diet with Complex Carbs According to Preeti Rao, Health and Wellness Coach, "Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables, lean protein and good sources of fat. Foods to avoid are those rich in trans fats (also called hydrogenated fat), processed food, and sugar. Complex carbohydrates are rich in fiber and are not highly processed like refined carbohydrates. They take longer to digest and hence provide a sustained source of energy for a longer duration." 3. Benefits of Barley A recent study done by Lund University in Sweden states tha Continue reading >>

Ano Ang Normal Na Blood Sugar?

Ano Ang Normal Na Blood Sugar?

Ang fasting blood sugar (FBS) ay kinukuha pagkatapos mag-fasting ng 8 hanggang 12 oras. Kinukuha ang dugo sa umaga pagkatapos mag-fasting sa gabi. Ang normal na fasting blood sugar ay 5.5 mmol/L pababa. Puwedeng i-multiply ang number na ito sa 18 upang makuha ang katumbas na mg/dL. Ang normal na FBS sa mg/dL ay 99 pababa. Kung dalawang beses na nagpakuha ng FBS at ito ay 7.0 mmol/L or 126 mg/dL pataas, diabetes na ito. May tinatawag na impaired fasting glucose (IFG). Minsan ang tawag dito ay borderline diabetes o prediabetes. Ang FBS na 100-125 mg/dL o 5.6-6.9 mmol/L ay impaired fasting glucose. Kaya ang 6.08 mmol/L na resulta ng nagtatanong ay mapapabilang sa impaired fasting glucose. Kung may IFG, ibig sabihin malapit na ito sa diabetes. Dapat magsumikap na kumain nang tama at mag-ehersisyo upang marating ang tamang timbang para hindi mauwi sa diabetes. Depende sa history ng pasyente, maari ring ipasailalim ang taong may IFG sa ikalawang test ang oral glucose tolerance test o OGTT upang malaman kung may diabetes na. Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Sugar: Normal Levels And Testing

Fasting Blood Sugar: Normal Levels And Testing

Fasting blood sugar provides vital clues about how the body is managing blood sugar levels. Blood sugar tends to peak about an hour after eating, and declines after that. High fasting blood sugar levels point to insulin resistance or diabetes. Abnormally low fasting blood sugar could be due to diabetes medications. Knowing when to test and what to look for can help keep people with, or at risk of, diabetes healthy. What are fasting blood sugar levels? Following a meal, blood sugar levels rise, usually peaking about an hour after eating. How much blood sugar rises by and the precise timing of the peak depends on diet. Large meals tend to trigger larger blood sugar rises. High-sugar carbohydrates, such as bread and sweetened snacks, also cause more significant blood sugar swings. Normally, as blood sugar rises, the pancreas releases insulin. Insulin lowers blood sugar, breaking it down so that the body can use it for energy or store it for later. However, people who have diabetes have difficulties with insulin in the following ways: People with type 1 diabetes do not produce enough insulin because the body attacks insulin-producing cells. People with type 2 diabetes do not respond well to insulin and, later, may not make enough insulin. In both cases, the result is the same: elevated blood sugar levels and difficulties using sugar. This means that fasting blood sugar depends on three factors: the contents of the last meal the size of the last meal the body's ability to produce and respond to insulin Blood sugar levels in between meals offer a window into how the body manages sugar. High levels of fasting blood sugar suggest that the body has been unable to lower the levels of sugar in the blood. This points to either insulin resistance or inadequate insulin production, an Continue reading >>

A Comparison Of Hba1c And Fasting Blood Sugar Tests In General Population

A Comparison Of Hba1c And Fasting Blood Sugar Tests In General Population

Go to: Abstract Objectives: Early diagnosis of diabetes is crucially important in reduction of the complications. Although HbA1c is an accurate marker for the prediction of complications, less information is available about its accuracy in diagnosis of diabetes. In this study, the association between HbA1c and FBS was assessed through a cross-sectional population-based study. Methods: A random sample of population in Kerman city was selected. The total number was 604 people. Their HbA1c and fasting blood sugar (FBS) were tested. The association between HbA1c and FBS and also their sensitivity, specificity and predictive values in detection of abnormal values of each other were determined. The association of HbA1c with FBS was relatively strong particularly in diabetic subjects. Generally, FBS was a more accurate predictor for HbA1c compared with HbA1c as a predictor of FBS. Although the optimum cutoff point of HbA1c was >6.15%, its precision was comparable with the conventional cutoff point of >6%. Conclusions: In conclusion, FBS sounds more reliable to separate diabetic from non-diabetic subjects than HbA1c. In case of being interested in using HbA1c in screening, the conventional cutoff points of 6% is an acceptable threshold for discrimination of diabetics from non-diabetics. Keywords: HbA1c, Blood glucose, Diabetics *The adjusted values were computed in a multivariable regression model with sex, BMI and age as independent variables. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level

Blood Sugar Level

The fluctuation of blood sugar (red) and the sugar-lowering hormone insulin (blue) in humans during the course of a day with three meals. One of the effects of a sugar-rich vs a starch-rich meal is highlighted.[1] The blood sugar level, blood sugar concentration, or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose present in the blood of humans and other animals. Glucose is a simple sugar and approximately 4 grams of glucose are present in the blood of humans at all times.[2] The body tightly regulates blood glucose levels as a part of metabolic homeostasis.[2] Glucose is stored in skeletal muscle and liver cells in the form of glycogen;[2] in fasted individuals, blood glucose is maintained at a constant level at the expense of glycogen stores in the liver and skeletal muscle.[2] In humans, glucose is the primary source of energy, and is critical for normal function, in a number of tissues,[2] particularly the human brain which consumes approximately 60% of blood glucose in fasted, sedentary individuals.[2] Glucose can be transported from the intestines or liver to other tissues in the body via the bloodstream.[2] Cellular glucose uptake is primarily regulated by insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas.[2] Glucose levels are usually lowest in the morning, before the first meal of the day, and rise after meals for an hour or two by a few millimoles. Blood sugar levels outside the normal range may be an indicator of a medical condition. A persistently high level is referred to as hyperglycemia; low levels are referred to as hypoglycemia. Diabetes mellitus is characterized by persistent hyperglycemia from any of several causes, and is the most prominent disease related to failure of blood sugar regulation. There are different methods of testing and measuring blood sugar le Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Managing Glucose Levels

What You Should Know About Managing Glucose Levels

If you have diabetes, managing your blood glucose level is an important part of managing your condition. That’s because high blood sugar levels can cause long-term complications. When you have diabetes, your body isn’t able to get the sugar from blood into cells, or make enough or any insulin. This causes high levels of blood sugar, or high glucose levels. After meals, it’s the foods that have carbohydrates that cause blood sugar levels to go up. When we eat foods that contain carbohydrates, the digestion process turns them into sugars that are released into the blood. Those sugars are then transported through the blood and travel to the cells. The pancreas, a small organ in the abdomen, releases a hormone called insulin to meet the sugar at the cell. Insulin will connect onto spots on some cells of the body and act as a “bridge,” allowing the sugar to go from the blood and into the cell. The cell uses the sugar for energy, and blood sugar levels go down. With diabetes, there’s either a problem with the cells using insulin, a problem with the pancreas producing insulin, or both. With type 1 diabetes, the body stops making insulin completely. With type 2 diabetes, it’s usually a mix of the cells not using insulin well, which is called insulin resistance. And the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin. With prediabetes, it is usually a problem with the cells not using insulin well. Keep reading to learn more about checking and managing your glucose levels. Talk to you doctor or healthcare providers about the best times to check your blood glucose, as optimal times vary by person. Some options include: after fasting (after waking or not eating for eight to 12 hours) or before meals before and after meals, to see the impact that the meal had on your blood suga Continue reading >>

What Is Pre-diabetes And Who Is At Risk?

What Is Pre-diabetes And Who Is At Risk?

What is pre-diabetes? A person who has higher than normal blood sugar but not high enough to be diagnosed as having diabetes Blood tests help determine if a person has pre-diabetes Persons with pre-diabetes are at risk of developing diabetes Diabetes is a lifelong health condition that keeps sugar in the get to the cells that need it. How do I know if I have pre-diabetes? There are usually no symptoms of pre-diabetes. The best way to diagnose pre-diabetes is by a blood test: A fasting blood sugar (FBS) or a oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). What is a fasting blood sugar (FBS) test? This means that a sample of the blood is drawn usually in the morning–after not eating or drinking (except water) for 8-12 hours The concentration of glucose or sugar in the blood is examined FBS results: Pre diabetes=100-125 mg/dl Diabetes=126 mg/dl or higher Two FBS are required to confirm diagnosis A normal FBS is below 100 mg/dl What is mg/dl? This means milligrams/deciliter mg/dl is a unit of measurement used to measure blood sugar concentration This measurement may also be written as mg% What is oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)? A 2 hour oral glucose tolerance test This test usually follows an FBS The person being tested is given a concentrated sugar drink 2 hours after the sugar drink, another blood test sample is drawn to check the level of glucose present in the blood OGTT results OGTT measures fasting blood sugar before and after a person drinks a solution containing concentrated glucose (sugar), OGTT results mean pre-diabetes if: FBS is 126 mg/dl or less And the second test is 140-199 mg/dl two hours after the glucose drink Who should be screened for pre-diabetes? ALL overweight adults and adolescents Those with one or more of the following: Family history of diabetes High ba Continue reading >>

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