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Accurate Glucose Meter

How Accurate Are Diabetic Testing Strips?

How Accurate Are Diabetic Testing Strips?

How Accurate Are Diabetic Testing Strips? When you have diabetes, your entire life revolves around blood glucose levels. What you eat, how much insulin you administer, and how you feel is all determined by whether your blood glucose levels are high, low or normal. At-home glucose monitoring systems allow diabetics to get the information they need to make critical day-to-day decisions, but just how accurate are these systems? How Do Diabetic Testing Strips Work? Test strips are designed to measure how much glucose is present in a diabetic’s blood. This information helps diabetics know when their glucose levels are too high or low. When diabetics know this information, they can make certain adjustments to their diets, medication and exercise routines to help get their glucose levels back to a normal range. Each diabetic test strip contains a small amount of a chemical known as glucose oxidase. When glucose oxidase comes into contact with blood, it creates a noticeable reaction. A glucose-monitoring meter will pick up that reaction, measure it and determine how much glucose is present in the blood stream. The more glucose that is present, the higher the reading. Do Diabetic Test Strips Expire? A huge determining factor in diabetic test strip accuracy is the glucose oxidase. Over time, glucose oxidase loses its ability to react to glucose in the blood stream. The older the test strip, the weaker glucose oxidase gets. Weak glucose oxidase can, and will, impact diabetic test strip accuracy and produce meter readings that are either way too high or too low. Each and every box of diabetic test strips comes with an expiration date. Unfortunately, there is a lot of controversy surrounding this date. Some individuals believe the date is extremely accurate, while others believe i Continue reading >>

Freestyle Precision Neo Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

Freestyle Precision Neo Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

As a global leader in diabetes care, Abbott is constantly working to develop the highest quality products that deliver accurate blood glucose monitoring. The FreeStyle Precision Neo system was created to meet our high accuracy standards and has undergone rigorous testing to ensure that we are bringing you only the highest quality product. Read more to learn about results from clinical trials around accuracy for the FreeStyle Precision Neo system. Error Reduction from Fill Trigger Test prevents from starting until there's enough blood on the test strip, helping to reduce errors and strip waste. End Fill or Top Fill Test Strip Test Only Starts when Sufficient Sample is Applied 1Owen Mumford Ltd. A single blind, randomized, 8 way crossover study to compare the blood volume and pain perception of capillary blood sampling. Simbec Research. 2007. 2Savings based on comparison to list prices of major brands at retailers; data on file. You may not realize savings relative to your prescription copay. Check your insurance coverage and copay to determine whether FreeStyle Precision Neo can save you money. 3Clinical Study "Evaluation of the FreeStyle Precision Neo Blood Glucose Monitoring System, 2015". *Check for participating locations. Based on retail price. Price does not include tax. The views and opinions expressed are based on individual symptoms, situations and circumstances which may vary. Please consult with your physician or qualified health provider regarding your condition and appropriate medical treatment. For In Vitro Diagnostic Use. FreeStyle Precision Neo blood glucose test strips are intended to be used with FreeStyle Precision Neo meters only. FreeStyle and related brand marks are trademarks of Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. in various jurisdictions. Other trademarks a Continue reading >>

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

These 10 meters varied in age and wear.Some were old, some were new one wasmy own personalmeter that I used to calibrate my CGM and make mission-criticaldecisions each day.All of them passed their respective control solution tests, so its safe to assume that they werein good working order. I tried to match the testing method employed by Chris (author of the original post ) as closely as possible. Eightrounds of testing were performed over the course of 24 hours according to the following procedure: Order of meters was randomized for each round. Tests were performed only when CGM readings were stable (i.e. no insulin on board and CGM showing a slope of ~0 mg/dL/min). I didnt do anything special to stabilize my blood glucose just tested as I went about a normal day. The test strips used for each meter all came from their own unique vials. Before and after completing the eight testing rounds, the meters were checked using their respective control solutions. They all passed the control solution tests. Unlike Chris, I didnt have an alarming spread in my results for any round. The overallbetween-meter variability (% Error, or %CV for you stats folks) was only 6%. In plain English:My treatment decisions wouldnt have varied much at all, regardless of the meter I was using. One unit of rapid-acting insulin brings my BG down by ~80 mg/dL, and I correct whenever Im over 100 mg/dL. Ill usually correct down to 70-110 mg/dL, depending on my plans for the next couplehours (big meal = correct to 70; workout = correct to 110). Iwasrelieved to see that even if I tooka correction bolus for the maximum BG of each round, I still would have been brought down to a desirableblood glucose level. For example, take Round 1. The highest reading I saw was 182 md/dL, and Id take 1 unit for that. Ev Continue reading >>

Is Your Blood Glucose Meter Accurate?

Is Your Blood Glucose Meter Accurate?

DiaTribe has an article on glucose meter accuracy by Jeemin Kwon and Adam Brown. I quote: Results from the Diabetes Technology Society’s Blood Glucose Meter Surveillance Program identifies only six out of 18 meters that passed. Did yours make the cut? The Diabetes Technology Society (DTS) recently revealed long-awaited results from its Blood Glucose Monitor System (BGMS) Surveillance Program. The rigorous study tested the accuracy of 18 popular blood glucose meters (BGM) used in the US. These FDA-cleared meters were purchased through retail outlets and tested rigorously at three study sites in over 1,000 people (including 840 people with diabetes). The results were troubling: only six out of the 18 devices met the DTS passing standard for meter accuracy – within 15% or 15 mg/dl of the laboratory value in over 95% of trials. The devices that passed were: Contour Next from Ascensia (formerly Bayer) – 100% Accu-Chek Aviva Plus from Roche – 98% Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) from Arkray – 97% CVS Advanced from Agamatrix – 97% FreeStyle Lite from Abbott – 96% Accu-Chek SmartView from Roche – 95% The devices that failed were: Walmart ReliOn Prime from Arkray – 92% OneTouch Verio from LifeScan – 92% Prodigy Auto Code from Prodigy – 90% OneTouch Ultra 2 from LifeScan – 90% Walmart ReliOn Ultima from Abbott – 89% Contour Classic from Bayer – 89% Embrace from Omnis Health – 88% True Result from HDI/Nipro – 88% True Track from HDI/Nipro – 81% Solus V2 from BioSense Medical – 76% Advocate Redi-Code+ from Diabetic Supply of Suncoast – 76% Gmate Smart from Philosys – 71% Source: Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data on 18 Meters | diaTribe Jardiance is a diabetes drug in the class called SGLT2 inhibitors. How do they work? Our kidneys fil Continue reading >>

How Accurate Is Your Blood Glucose Meter?

How Accurate Is Your Blood Glucose Meter?

We've come a long way from the days when urine strips only displayed a result when your glucose levels were high enough to spill over into your urine. But how accurate are today's blood glucose meters? When you place your blood on a strip, the glucose in that sample reacts with the chemicals in the strip setting up a small electrical current, which the meter reads. The more glucose that is in the sample the higher the current and the higher the reading. When you consider the delicate components in the strip, such as the size of the strip and blood sample and the size of the meter, it is a wonder of technology that readings can be as accurate as they are. In placing and keeping a blood glucose meter on the market, meter makers must obey the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). These standards are enforced by Australia's own governing body the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA), which from time to time will recall these products when they don't meet certain conditions. In 2013, new regulations for meter accuracy were agreed. These standards were enforced in 2016. Project leader, Dr Alan Cariski, comments, "More accurate glucose measurements will help patients to better regulate their diabetes through more informed treatment decisions that may affect, for example, dietary intake and medication dose, especially insulin." (Lazarte, 2013) What does this mean for you? In meters, readings greater than 4.2 mmol/l, must have an accuracy of +-15 per cent for 99 per cent of readings. However, let's translate this to real life with a couple of examples: Your blood glucose meter reading of 10.0mmol/l really may range from 11.5 to 8.5mmol/l for 99 per cent of readings Your blood glucose meter reading of 4.2mmol/l really may range from 4.8 to 3.6 mmol/l for 99 per Continue reading >>

How To Get An Accurate Glucose Reading For Diabetic Patients

How To Get An Accurate Glucose Reading For Diabetic Patients

Diabetes is a significant health care problem in the United States and is the seventh leading cause of death [1]. EMS personnel frequently encounter patients experiencing some type of diabetic event. Familiarity with the pathophysiology, signs, and symptoms can help responders differentiate diabetic patients from other patients with similar symptoms. Reasons for inaccurate glucose readings One very common assessment step in a patient suspected of having a diabetic emergency is to determine the patient's blood glucose level, often by using a handheld monitor. It is important to note that handheld monitors can be divided into two distinct categories [2]. Over-the counter monitors are designed for single patient use. These monitors allow a patient suffering from diabetes to monitor their own glucose state and adjust their self-administered medication based on those results. Point-of-care monitors are used in a professional setting such as an emergency department or EMS agency. POC monitors are designed for use on many patients. Although a number of studies demonstrate acceptable accuracy for handheld blood glucose monitors under controlled conditions, accuracy is often suboptimal during actual clinical situations, which could have a significant impact on therapy [3, 4, 5, 6,7,8,9,10, 11, 12, 13, 14]. An Australian study demonstrates that meters tend to overestimate glucose levels when compared to reference values, with one common meter averaging about 25 mg/dl higher than the reference device.[4]In an investigation involving more than 18,000 patients, Canadian researchers found glucose measurement differences greater than 90 mg/dl in one in 200 meters designed for home use [15]. This degree of measurement error could result in patient self-administration of higher than nec Continue reading >>

Accuracy Standards In Glucose Meters: Why Do Different Meters Read Different Results?

Accuracy Standards In Glucose Meters: Why Do Different Meters Read Different Results?

Our diabetes educator helps you understand your blood glucose meter. My patients frequently come to me with questions concerning their blood glucose testing equipment. A commonly asked question is “Why do my testing results vary meter to meter?” The answer simplified is that meters are tested for accuracy and must adhere to standards that prior to 2014 in the US, could vary by 20 percent and can now only vary by 15 percent. The variation allowance confused a lot of patients. This can be especially alarming when using a new product that doesn’t seem to “match up” to a blood glucose meter you have been using. The ISO, International Standards Organization, has guidelines that meter companies must meet. The FDA in the US follows these guidelines. Currently, all measured blood glucose meter values must be within 15 percent of the true lab value of blood glucose 95 percent of the time and within 20 percent of the lab value 99 percent of the time. The standards also go on to state that 95 percent of all test results be within 20 percent of test results greater than 75mg/dl and within 15mg/dl for values The standards also go on to state that 95 percent of all test results be within 20 percent of test results greater than 75mg/dl and within 15mg/dl for values below 75mg/dl (this additional criterion was set up for meters used in physician offices.) Although this can be confusing, a blood glucose value that is a lab value of 100mg/dl could conceivably show up on a meter as 80-120mg/dl and still be considered accurate. Fortunately, Dario has undergone considerable testing and meets and/or exceeds ISO standards by being within blank percent 99% of the time. What does this mean for you, the end user? This means that meters manufactured before the stricter ISO standards wer Continue reading >>

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

Our Process We spent over 80 hours researching the best 30 glucometers on the market. We considered the specifications, features, user reviews, medical studies, availability and cost. After eliminating models that used old technology, like coding, or were too difficult to find in stores, we purchased the best 12 blood glucose meters so we could perform hands-on evaluations of each device. Before diving into our recommendations for the best glucometers, it’s important to note that Top Ten Reviews is not a substitute for your primary care physician. Our recommendations are made based on common scenarios, hands-on experience, market cost evaluations and a comparison of important features, but they’re not a replacement for advice from your doctor. We are not medical experts. $19.99 The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from its main feature – Bluetooth that connects it to a mobile app on your smartphone. This provides excellent data management of your readings so you can spot patterns and better treat your diabetes. In addition, the device's interface is one of the easiest to navigate. It has multiple buttons so you can get to the features you need quickly, and the display is high-contrast with big numbers. Another reason why the Aviva Connect is the best glucometer is the availability of its test strips – they are everywhere. We couldn't find a pharmacy or online store that didn't stock them. Of course, the one significant downside to the test strips is their cost. At $1.39 per strip in a pack of 100 and $1.52 per strip in a pack of 50, they’re more expensive than most test strips on the market. Best Glucometer for Value & Availability $13.95 The CONTOUR NEXT is our pick for the best glucometer if your primary concerns are overall value and the availability o Continue reading >>

Accuracy Evaluation Of Five Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems Obtained From The Pharmacy: A European Multicenter Study With 453 Subjects

Accuracy Evaluation Of Five Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems Obtained From The Pharmacy: A European Multicenter Study With 453 Subjects

Go to: Abstract This multicenter study was conducted to evaluate the performance of five recently introduced blood glucose (BG) monitoring (BGM) devices under daily routine conditions in comparison with the YSI (Yellow Springs, OH) 2300 Stat Plus glucose analyzer. Five hundred one diabetes patients with experience in self-monitoring of BG were randomized to use three of five different BGM devices (FreeStyle Lite® [Abbott Diabetes Care Inc., Alameda, CA], FreeStyle Freedom Lite [Abbott Diabetes Care], OneTouch® UltraEasy® [LifeScan Inc., Milpitas, CA], Accu-Chek® Aviva [Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany], and Contour® [Bayer Vital GmbH, Leverkusen, Germany]) in a daily routine setting. All devices and strips were purchased from local regular distribution sources (pharmacies, four strip lots per device). The patients performed the finger prick and the glucose measurement on their own. In parallel, a healthcare professional performed the glucose assessment with the reference method (YSI 2300 Stat Plus). The primary objective was the comparison of the mean absolute relative differences (MARD). Secondary objectives were compliance with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) accuracy criteria under these routine conditions and Clarke and Parkes Error Grid analyses. MARD ranged from 4.9% (FreeStyle Lite) to 9.7% (OneTouch UltraEasy). The ISO 15197:2003 requirements were fulfilled by the FreeStyle Lite (98.8%), FreeStyle Freedom Lite (97.5%), and Accu-Chek Aviva (97.0%), but not by the Contour (92.4%) and OneTouch UltraEasy (91.1%). The number of values in Zone A of the Clarke Error Grid analysis was highest for the FreeStyle Lite (98.8%) and lowest for the OneTouch Ultra Easy (90.4%). FreeStyle Lite, FreeStyle Freedom Lite, and Accu-Chek Aviva perform Continue reading >>

Demonstration Of Disinfection Procedure For The Development Of Accurate Blood Glucose Meters In Accordance With Iso 15197:2013

Demonstration Of Disinfection Procedure For The Development Of Accurate Blood Glucose Meters In Accordance With Iso 15197:2013

Abstract Despite measures to reduce disease transmission, a risk can occur when blood glucose meters (BGMs) are used on multiple individuals or by caregivers assisting a patient. The laboratory and in-clinic performance of a BGM system before and after disinfection should be demonstrated to guarantee accurate readings and reliable control of blood glucose (BG) for patients. In this study, an effective disinfection procedure, conducting wiping 10 times to assure a one minute contact time of the disinfectant on contaminated surface, was first demonstrated using test samples of the meter housing materials, including acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), and polycarbonate (PC), in accordance with ISO 15197:2013. After bench studies comprising 10,000 disinfection cycles, the elemental compositions of the disinfected ABS, PMMA, and PC samples were almost the same as in the original samples, as indicated by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Subsequently, the validated disinfection procedure was then directly applied to disinfect 5 commercial BGM systems composed of ABS, PMMA, or PC to observe the effect of the validated disinfection procedure on meter accuracy. The results of HBsAg values after treatment with HBV sera and disinfectant wipes for each material were less than the LoD of each material of 0.020 IU/mL. Before and after the multiple disinfection cycles, 900 of 900 samples (100%) were within the system accuracy requirements of ISO 15197:2013. All of the systems showed high performance before and after the series of disinfection cycles and met the ISO 15197:2013 requirements. In addition, our results demonstrated multiple cleaning and disinfection cycles that represented normal use over the lifetime of a meter of 3–5 years. Continue reading >>

Contour®next Link Meter Portfolio.

Contour®next Link Meter Portfolio.

The only FDA approved linking meter portfolio for use with Medtronic MiniMed® insulin pump systems. The meters from the CONTOUR®NEXT LINK** portfolio were exclusively designed to transmit proven highly accurate1,2 CONTOUR®NEXT blood glucose test strip results wirelessly to compatible MiniMed® insulin pumps for easy and accurate CGM calibration and optimal insulin dosing.* MINIMED 670G AND MINIMED 630G SYSTEMS The CONTOUR®NEXT LINK 2.4 Meter from Ascensia Diabetes Care is the only FDA-approved linking meter for use with the MiniMed 670G and MiniMed 630G systems with SmartGuard™ technology. The high accuracy and precision demonstrated by the CONTOUR®NEXT LINK 2.4 Meter has helped to close the gap between laboratory accuracy and real-word test results.2,3 Clinical studies have demonstrated that accurate meter readings are important for insulin pump systems to help avoid hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin dosing errors.4 Wireless Connection - Sends results proven to be highly accurate2 to the MiniMed 670G and MiniMed 630G pump for easy insulin dosing and CGM calibration.* MINIMED 530G SYSTEM The CONTOUR®NEXT LINK meter allows seamless integration as part of the MiniMed® 530G insulin pump system, transmitting proven highly accurate1 blood glucose results wirelessly to the insulin pump. The CONTOUR®NEXT LINK meter is the only meter that is labeled for use with MiniMed 530G insulin pump. HIGHLY ACCURATE The Mean Absolute Relative Difference (MARD) in blood glucose readings between the meter and lab has been shown to be just 2.7 percent.5 Built-in USB connects directly to your computer for easy downloading of data to CareLink® software and for battery recharging. The CONTOUR®NEXT LINK Meter is the only meter labeled for use with the MiniMed 530G system. The C Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

When you check your blood sugar, it's easy to assume that the meter will give you an accurate result. However, a meter's accuracy depends upon a lot of factors. Roche, the maker of Accu-Chek products, believes that you deserve a reliable meter and a test result you can act upon with confidence. That's why ensuring quality and accuracy has always been our top priority. In an average week, our quality control process tests a combined total of over 60,000 Accu-Chek test strips for consistent accuracy.1 In addition, strict manufacturing processes ensure that our products meet uncompromising standards of quality. For example: For every lot of Accu-Chek test strips, containing millions of strips, one out of every 128 vials is tested for consistency of performance. Vials representative of the entire lot are tested a second time, with blood at a variety of glucose levels, to reflect a real-world environment. To ensure that all strips we release to the market meet our high quality standards, investigation and additional testing are performed should a test strip sample show a reading outside specific ranges. Rest assured that Accu-Chek blood glucose monitoring systems provide reliable results you can trust. 1Data on file. Based on average weekly strip production of approximately 80M and includes a combination of testing test strips for accuracy and precision standards. Continue reading >>

Testing Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

Testing Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

The Accu-Chek Aviva blood glucose meter gets the highest rating for accuracy and precision. It was first in an evaluation of a dozen meters conducted by a team of testing experts at Germany’s University of Ulm led by Guido Freckmann, M.D. In the more than 20 years that I have been writing about diabetes, few studies of meter accuracy have appeared. Dr. Freckmann and his team of researchers have been the most relevant, reliable, and prolific in testing our meters. But some of the meters that they evaluated aren’t available in the United States. The leading diabetes journal that evaluates our meters just released the full text of this meter accuracy study. The editors tell me that the study will be free online only until March 31. The most important takeaways of the study So don’t wait too long if you want to review the whole thing. Meanwhile, I summarize below what I think is the most relevant information. The journal is Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, and the study is “Evaluation of 12 Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems for Self-Testing: System Accuracy and Measurement Reproducibility.” The journal published it two years ago, but until now only the abstract has been freely available to us. Dr. Freckmann and his colleagues rated the meters against both the current and proposed standards. The current standard can be met more easily. It requires that at least 95 percent of the results fall within plus or minus 15 mg/dl at blood glucose levels below 75 mg/dl and within plus or minus 20 mg/dl at levels greater than or equal to 75 mg/dl. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) set this level back in 2003, and it is the standard not only in Europe but also in the United States because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration uses it. The tighter stand Continue reading >>

Pet Glucose Meters Vs. Human Glucose Meters

Pet Glucose Meters Vs. Human Glucose Meters

by Robin Two months ago, my 13-year-old male cat Zulu was diagnosed as having feline diabetes. Zulu is a beautiful long haired manx. Now, after many visits to my veterinarian to do glucose monitoring, it was suggested that I might want to use a home monitor. I have done literally hours of research to find what meter would be best suited for my cat and have come away with two points: 1.) Only use a pet meter for the most accurate results. 2.) If you are to use human meters, choose one that can utilize the smallest blood sample such as, Freesyle Lite. Can someone help me sort this out please? Thank you for your response, Robin Dear Robin Thank you for writing in with your question. I recommend home monitoring for all of my feline diabetes patients, and have always used human glucometers in my practice and so have my clients. Human glucose meters have the benefit of easy access to additional test strips and batteries from your local pharmacy. There are many different models on the market these days and it is easy to find one that only requires a very small blood sample for testing. The other thing to consider heavily when purchasing a glucometer is the cost of the strips. Just recently, I realized how much more I was paying for strips than I needed to and ended up purchasing a new glucometer just so I could start buying the cheaper strips. The savings in the price of strips has already paid for the new glucometer. The most important thing, however, is to measure your chosen glucometer's accuracy. You should bring the meter you choose to your veterinarian's office and ask them to compare the results from your meter with their own meter, or to test a blood sample on your meter and have it compared with an outside laboratory's results. Keep in mind that all glucometers are go Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitors: What Factors Affect Accuracy?

Blood Glucose Monitors: What Factors Affect Accuracy?

Sometimes my blood glucose monitor seems to give incorrect readings. What can I do to make sure the measurement is accurate? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. When used correctly, blood glucose monitors — small devices that measure and display your blood sugar level — are usually accurate. But occasionally they may be incorrect. Consider these factors that affect meter accuracy and the steps to resolve or prevent the problem: Factors that affect accuracy Solutions Test strip problems Throw out damaged or outdated test strips. Store strips in their sealed container; keep them away from heat, moisture and humidity. Be sure the strips are meant for your specific glucose meter. Extreme temperatures Keep your glucose meter and test strips at room temperature. Alcohol, dirt or other substances on your skin Wash and dry your hands and the testing site thoroughly before pricking your skin. Improper coding Some meters must be coded to each container of test strips. Be sure the code number in the device matches the code number on the test strip container. Monitor problems Fully insert the test strip into the monitor. Replace the monitor batteries as needed. Not enough blood applied to the test strip Touch a generous drop of blood to the test strip. Don't add more blood to the test strip after the first drop is applied. Testing site location If you're using a site other than your fingertip and you think the reading is wrong, test again using blood from a fingertip. Blood samples from alternate sites aren't as accurate as fingertip samples when your blood sugar level is rising or falling quickly. The amount of red blood cells in your blood If you are dehydrated or your red blood cell count is low (anemia), your test results may be less accurate. Blood glucose monitor quality Continue reading >>

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