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A1c Changes

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

For some, home blood sugar testing can be an important and useful tool for managing your blood sugar on a day-to-day basis. Still, it only provides a snapshot of what’s happening in the moment, not long-term information, says Gregory Dodell, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. For this reason, your doctor may occasionally administer a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past two to three months. Called the A1C test, or the hemoglobin A1C test, this provides a more accurate picture of how well your type 2 diabetes management plan is working. Taking the A1C Test If your diabetes is well controlled and your blood sugar levels have remained stable, the American Diabetes Association recommends that you have the A1C test two times each year. This simple blood draw can be done in your doctor's office. Some doctors can use a point-of-care A1C test, where a finger stick can be done in the office, with results available in about 10 minutes. The A1C test results provide insight into how your treatment plan is working, and how it might be modified to better control the condition. Your doctor may want to run the test as often as every three months if your A1C is not within your target range. What the A1C Results Mean The A1C test measures the glucose (blood sugar) in your blood by assessing the amount of what’s called glycated hemoglobin. “Hemoglobin is a protein within red blood cells. As glucose enters the bloodstream, it binds to hemoglobin, or glycates. The more glucose that enters the bloodstream, the higher the amount of glycated hemoglobin,” Dr. Dodell says. An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 perce Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

Doctors' Group Issues Controversial Advice For Type 2 Diabetes

Doctors' Group Issues Controversial Advice For Type 2 Diabetes

Doctors' group issues controversial advice for type 2 diabetes (Reuters Health) - A large organization of internal medicine physicians said today that adults with type 2 diabetes can aim for an easier-to-achieve blood sugar target than whats been used to guide treatment in the past. That advice is already controversial, however. Based on its review of six sets of guidelines from other organizations, the American College of Physicians (ACP) said doctors can tell patients to aim for a so-called glycosylated hemoglobin, or HbA1C, level between 7 percent and 8 percent, rather than the traditional 6.5 percent to 7 percent. The HbA1C level reflects the persons average blood glucose level for the last several months. In new guidance published in Annals of Internal Medicine, the ACPs Dr. Amir Qaseem and colleagues made four major recommendations. Clinicians treating patients with type 2 diabetes should: - Personalize goals for blood sugar control based on a discussion of benefits and harms of drug therapy, patient preferences, patient health and life expectancy, treatment burden and costs of care. - Aim to achieve an HbA1C level between 7% and 8% in most patients. - Consider deintensifying drug therapy in patients with A1C levels less than 6.5% - Treat patients to minimize low blood sugar symptoms and avoid targeting an A1C level in patients with a life expectancy less than 10 years because the harms outweigh the benefits. The guidance also states that a lower treatment target is appropriate if achievable with diet and lifestyle modifications and that clinicians should emphasize to patients the importance of exercise, weight loss, smoking cessation and other lifestyle changes. Three clinicians commented in emails to Reuters Health. None disagreed with the guidance to personali Continue reading >>

Acp Sets Eased Blood Sugar Control Levels In New T2d Guidelines

Acp Sets Eased Blood Sugar Control Levels In New T2d Guidelines

ACP Sets Eased Blood Sugar Control Levels in New T2D Guidelines The American College of Physicians (ACP) has released new guidelines recommending less intensive blood sugar control (A1C) targets for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). According to the new guidelines, patients should be treated to achieve A1C levels between 7% and 8% a lenient change from the previous 6.5% to 7% standard of the previous guidelines. Although the A1C test indicates diabetes in a patient at 6.5% blood sugar level, evidence for a reduction in microvascular complications due to tighter treatment target levels is lacking, according to the ACP. The only proven reductions to come from earlier treatment due to stricter guideline levels are in surrogate microvascular complications, such as excess proteins in patients urine. The ACP maintained that clinicians should personalize patients goals for blood sugar control in T2D. Patient treatment personalization should be based on general health, life expectancy, treatment burden, and costs of care. David W. Lam, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Diseases at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, told MD Magazine that the guideline changes come in an era of increasing diabetes rates, in an aging population that is in need of consideration to more clinical scenarios. The treatment recommendations in this clinical guideline are not drastically different from the recommendations by other professional organizations and therefore I would not expect a drastic change in clinical practice, Lam said. Where significant change is notable in the guidelines is in its standard of A1C levels by which to de-escalate therapy, Lam said. He reiterated the importance of physicians considering the potential impac Continue reading >>

The A1c Test & Diabetes

The A1c Test & Diabetes

What is the A1C test? The A1C test is a blood test that provides information about a person’s average levels of blood glucose, also called blood sugar, over the past 3 months. The A1C test is sometimes called the hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c, or glycohemoglobin test. The A1C test is the primary test used for diabetes management and diabetes research. How does the A1C test work? The A1C test is based on the attachment of glucose to hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. In the body, red blood cells are constantly forming and dying, but typically they live for about 3 months. Thus, the A1C test reflects the average of a person’s blood glucose levels over the past 3 months. The A1C test result is reported as a percentage. The higher the percentage, the higher a person’s blood glucose levels have been. A normal A1C level is below 5.7 percent. Can the A1C test be used to diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? Yes. In 2009, an international expert committee recommended the A1C test as one of the tests available to help diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes.1 Previously, only the traditional blood glucose tests were used to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes. Because the A1C test does not require fasting and blood can be drawn for the test at any time of day, experts are hoping its convenience will allow more people to get tested—thus, decreasing the number of people with undiagnosed diabetes. However, some medical organizations continue to recommend using blood glucose tests for diagnosis. Why should a person be tested for diabetes? Testing is especially important because early in the disease diabetes has no symptoms. Although no test is perfect, the A1C and blood glucose tests are the best tools available to diagnose diabetes—a serious and li Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Lower Your A1c Level

6 Ways To Lower Your A1c Level

Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease that can lead to many complications. When managed properly, diabetes does not have to control your life or ruin your health. Getting tested, especially if you are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, is a proactive measure you can take for yourself and your future. In the early stages of diabetes, there are no symptoms. An early diagnosis helps you get treatment before complications occur. The A1C test is a blood test that checks for type 2 diabetes. It is also used to see how well you are managing your diabetes if you have already been diagnosed. The test provides information about a person’s average levels of blood sugar over a two- to three-month period. The number is reported in the form of a percentage. The higher the percentage, the higher your average blood glucose levels are, and the higher your risk for either diabetes or related complications. A1C is one of the primary tests used for diabetes diagnosis and management. It can test for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but it can’t test for gestational diabetes. It can also be used to predict the likelihood that someone will get diabetes. The A1C test measures how much glucose, or sugar, is attached to hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells. The more glucose attached, the higher the A1C. This test is groundbreaking, as it 1) doesn’t require fasting, 2) gives a picture of blood sugar levels over a period of days and weeks instead of at just one point in time like fasting sugars, and 3) can be done at any time of day. This makes it easier to administer and easier to make accurate diagnoses. According to the National Institutes of Health, a normal A1C is below 5.7 percent. If your score is between 5.7 and 6.4 percent, the diagnosis is prediabetes. Having prediabetes put Continue reading >>

Invokana® Monotherapy Demonstrated Significantly Greater Reductions In A1c Vs Placebo At 26 Weeks1

Invokana® Monotherapy Demonstrated Significantly Greater Reductions In A1c Vs Placebo At 26 Weeks1

WARNING: LOWER-LIMB AMPUTATION An approximately 2-fold increased risk of lower-limb amputations associated with INVOKANA® use was observed in CANVAS and CANVAS-R, two large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials in patients with type 2 diabetes who had established cardiovascular disease (CVD) or were at risk for CVD. Amputations of the toe and midfoot were most frequent; however, amputations involving the leg were also observed. Some patients had multiple amputations, some involving both limbs. Before initiating, consider factors that may increase the risk of amputation, such as a history of prior amputation, peripheral vascular disease, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulcers. Monitor patients receiving INVOKANA® for infection, new pain or tenderness, sores, or ulcers involving the lower limbs, and discontinue if these complications occur. CONTRAINDICATIONS History of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to INVOKANA®, such as anaphylaxis or angioedema Severe renal impairment (eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m2), end-stage renal disease, or patients on dialysis WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS Lower-Limb Amputation: An approximately 2-fold increased risk of lower-limb amputations associated with INVOKANA® use was observed in CANVAS and CANVAS-R, two large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials evaluating patients with type 2 diabetes who had either established cardiovascular disease or were at risk for cardiovascular disease. In CANVAS, INVOKANA®-treated patients and placebo-treated patients had 5.9 and 2.8 amputations per 1000 patients per year, respectively. In CANVAS-R, INVOKANA®-treated patients and placebo-treated patients had 7.5 and 4.2 amputations per 1000 patients per year, respectively. The risk of lower-limb amputations was observed at both the 100-mg and 300-mg once-daily do Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To See A Change In The A1c Test Or Eag?

How Long Does It Take To See A Change In The A1c Test Or Eag?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

Exceeding All Expectations: A 7.1 Drop In A1c In 4 Months

Exceeding All Expectations: A 7.1 Drop In A1c In 4 Months

As a mission-driven entrepreneur and angel investor I am always trying to use the products of the companies I work with and their advice. I hadn’t anticipated getting diabetes when I first started working with John Moore and Frank Moss as they started Twine Health, but last Spring I had a unique opportunity to become a user of Twine and it literally saved my life. Diabetes is a huge problem as we all know - there are an estimated 350 million people living with this condition globally and every 7 seconds one person dies as a result of it. In mid-February of this year my son, Jonah, convinced me to stop drinking diet coke. I had a serious habit of drinking 2+ liters per day. The first week after Jonah and I stopped drinking diet coke I felt like I was losing weight. I started measuring my weight daily and was consistently losing about 1 lb every 2 - 3 days. Over the course of 8 weeks, I had lost 30 lbs and remarkably hadn’t changed my eating habits AT ALL. I was eating anything I wanted in any quantity I craved. I figured that the stars had aligned - similar to my friends with high metabolism, I could finally indulge my love for food without consequence. (I know, right?!) In April, I was in DC visiting my buddies Peter Barris and Harry Weller at New Enterprise Associates and wasn’t feeling quite right. My wife, Amy, suggested my unease might be related to blood sugar and recommended I pick up a glucometer just to check my level. First reading: 430. OK, so what is normal? I started searching online and turns out normal is 100! Alright, so now I have my first indication that something is rotten. I make a quick call to my primary care physician (PCP) and she tells me I need to go to the Emergency Room (ER) immediately, so of course I got on a plane and flew back to Bos Continue reading >>

Your A1c Levels – What Goal To Shoot For?

Your A1c Levels – What Goal To Shoot For?

Measuring Your A1C An A1C test gives you and your provider insight into all of your blood glucose ups and downs over the past two or three months. It’s like the 24/7 video of your blood sugar levels. Observing your A1C results and your blood glucose (also known as blood sugar) results together over time are two of the key tools you and your health care provider can use to monitor your progress and revise your therapy as needed over the years. Recent research is changing the way health professionals look at A1C levels. Instead of setting tight controls across the board, a healthy A1C level is now a moving target that depends on the patient. In the past, an A1C of 7 percent was considered a healthy goal for everyone. Yehuda Handelsman, M.D., medical director of the Metabolic Institute of America in Tarzana, California, says experts now recommend taking a patient-centered approach to managing A1C levels, which means evaluating goals based on individual diabetes management needs and personal and lifestyle preferences. Current ADA Goals The 2015 American Diabetes Association (ADA) Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes advise the following A1C levels: • 6.5 percent or less: This is a more stringent goal. Health care providers might suggest this for people who can achieve this goal without experiencing a lot of hypoglycemia episodes or other negative effects of having lower blood glucose levels. This may be people who have not had diabetes for many years (short duration); people with type 2 diabetes using lifestyle changes and/or a glucose-lowering medication that doesn’t cause hypoglycemia; younger adults with many years to live healthfully; and people with no significant heart and blood vessel disease. • 7 percent: This is a reasonable A1C goal for many adults with d Continue reading >>

Seasonal Patterns In Monthly Hemoglobin A1c Values

Seasonal Patterns In Monthly Hemoglobin A1c Values

Seasonal Patterns in Monthly Hemoglobin A1c Values Correspondence to Dr. Chin-Lin Tseng, Department of Veterans Affairs New Jersey Health Care System, East Orange VA Medical Center, 385 Tremont Avenue, #129, East Orange, NJ 07018 (e-mail: [email protected] ). Search for other works by this author on: American Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 161, Issue 6, 15 March 2005, Pages 565574, Chin-Lin Tseng, Michael Brimacombe, Minge Xie, Mangala Rajan, Hongwei Wang, John Kolassa, Stephen Crystal, Ting-Cheng Chen, Leonard Pogach, Monika Safford; Seasonal Patterns in Monthly Hemoglobin A1c Values, American Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 161, Issue 6, 15 March 2005, Pages 565574, The purpose of this study was to investigate seasonal variations in population monthly hemoglobin A1c (A1c) values over 2 years (from October 1998 to September 2000) among US diabetic veterans. The study cohort included 285,705 veterans with 856,181 A1c tests. The authors calculated the monthly average A1c values for the overall population and for subpopulations defined by age, sex, race, insulin use, and climate regions. A1c values were higher in winter and lower in summer with a difference of 0.22. The proportion of A1c values greater than 9.0% followed a similar seasonal pattern that varied from 17.3% to 25.3%. Seasonal autoregressive models including trigonometric function terms were fit to the monthly average A1c values. There were significant seasonal effects; the seasonal variation was consistent across different subpopulations. Regions with colder winter temperatures had larger winter-summer contrasts than did those with warmer winter temperatures. The seasonal patterns followed trends similar to those of many physiologic markers, cardiovascular and other diabetes outcomes, and mortality. Thes Continue reading >>

Adjusted Mean Change In A1c With Invokana® 300 Mg Vs Januvia® 100 Mg By Baseline A1c Subgroup2

Adjusted Mean Change In A1c With Invokana® 300 Mg Vs Januvia® 100 Mg By Baseline A1c Subgroup2

WARNING: LOWER-LIMB AMPUTATION An approximately 2-fold increased risk of lower-limb amputations associated with INVOKANA® use was observed in CANVAS and CANVAS-R, two large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials in patients with type 2 diabetes who had established cardiovascular disease (CVD) or were at risk for CVD. Amputations of the toe and midfoot were most frequent; however, amputations involving the leg were also observed. Some patients had multiple amputations, some involving both limbs. Before initiating, consider factors that may increase the risk of amputation, such as a history of prior amputation, peripheral vascular disease, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulcers. Monitor patients receiving INVOKANA® for infection, new pain or tenderness, sores, or ulcers involving the lower limbs, and discontinue if these complications occur. CONTRAINDICATIONS History of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to INVOKANA®, such as anaphylaxis or angioedema Severe renal impairment (eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m2), end-stage renal disease, or patients on dialysis WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS Lower-Limb Amputation: An approximately 2-fold increased risk of lower-limb amputations associated with INVOKANA® use was observed in CANVAS and CANVAS-R, two large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials evaluating patients with type 2 diabetes who had either established cardiovascular disease or were at risk for cardiovascular disease. In CANVAS, INVOKANA®-treated patients and placebo-treated patients had 5.9 and 2.8 amputations per 1000 patients per year, respectively. In CANVAS-R, INVOKANA®-treated patients and placebo-treated patients had 7.5 and 4.2 amputations per 1000 patients per year, respectively. The risk of lower-limb amputations was observed at both the 100-mg and 300-mg once-daily do Continue reading >>

The American College Of Physicians Recommends A1c Levels Between 7 And 8 Percent : Shots - Health News : Npr

The American College Of Physicians Recommends A1c Levels Between 7 And 8 Percent : Shots - Health News : Npr

A major medical association today suggested that doctors who treat people with Type 2 diabetes can set less aggressive blood sugar targets. But medical groups that specialize in diabetes sharply disagree. Half a dozen medical groups have looked carefully at the best treatment guidelines for the 29 million Americans who have Type 2 diabetes and have come up with somewhat differing guidelines. The American College of Physicians has reviewed those guidelines to provide its own recommendations , published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. It has decided that less stringent goals are appropriate for the key blood sugar test, called the A1C. "There are harms associated with overzealous treatment or inappropriate treatment focused on A1C targets," says Dr. Jack Ende , president of the ACP. "And for that reason, this is not the kind of situation where the college could just sit back and ignore things." The ACP, which represents internists, recommends that doctors aim for an A1C in the range of 7 to 8 percent, not the lower levels that other groups recommend. For people who have already achieved a lower level, "consider de-intensifying treatment," Ende says. "That is, reducing one of the medications, stopping a medication, just allow the A1C to be between 7 and 8." This Chef Lost 50 Pounds And Reversed Prediabetes With A Digital Program Some studies have shown that people who have aggressively pushed to lower their blood sugar are at somewhat higher risk of premature death. People also suffer from low blood sugar as a result of aggressive treatment. That was the case for Valerie Pennington, a special-needs teacher who lives in Odessa, Mo. She was diagnosed in her mid-40s and put on an aggressive treatment regime. "The nurse at school because I was going low so much made me ge Continue reading >>

Doctors' Group Issues Controversial Type 2 Diabetes Guidance

Doctors' Group Issues Controversial Type 2 Diabetes Guidance

The American College of Physicians (ACP) has issued new guidance on managing type 2 diabetes -- including relaxing the long-term blood sugar target called hemoglobin A1C. The A1C is a blood test that gives doctors an estimate of your blood sugar level average over the past few months. For most adults, the American Diabetes Association recommends a target A1C of below 7 percent. This goal may be altered based on individual circumstances. However, the new ACP guidance suggests that A1C should be between 7 and 8 percent for most adults with type 2 diabetes . For adults who achieve an A1C below 6.5 percent, the group suggests stepping down diabetes treatment to keep that level from going even lower. The American College of Physicians, which is a national organization of internal medicine doctors, also says that management goals should be personalized based on the benefits and risks of medications, patient preference, general health status and life expectancy. And, though the doctors' group has relaxed the suggested A1C targets, that doesn't mean type 2 diabetes isn't a serious problem. "These changes should in no way be interpreted as diabetes is unimportant," said Dr. Jack Ende, ACP's president. More than 29 million Americans have diabetes. Over time, high blood sugar levels can lead to vision loss , nerve problems, heart attacks, strokes and kidney failure. "Diabetes is such a prevalent problem, and there are so many guidelines and conflicting information out there, we wanted to do an assessment that would give our members the best possible advice," Ende said. "Also, A1C targets are being used now as a performance measure." And, when insurers expect all patients to fall under a certain A1C, that's "not always consistent with the best possible evidence," he explained. For Continue reading >>

Can You Lower Your A1c With Diet And Exercise?

Can You Lower Your A1c With Diet And Exercise?

This post may contain affiliate links. Purchasing through them helps support this website. This post may also contain items sent to A Girl's Gotta Spa! for consideration. Can You Lower Your A1C with Diet and Exercise? If you just received test results back from your doctor and he/she has indicated that you have an elevated HbA1C (or A1c for short), you may be wondering what that means and just what you can do to lower it to within normal range. Back in December I decided I wanted to be a Living Kidney Donor . Im at a point in my life where Im no longer satisfied with just living a basic life. I want to do more, see more and touch more lives before my time is up. To become a candidate for living kidney donation you have to go through a battery of tests over the course of several months. The very first round of bloodwork includes testing your HbA1C level to determine if you have diabetes or are considered pre-diabetic. Obviously you dont have to be looking to donate a kidney to have this test done, as its something your doctor will do when you have blood sugar issues. Mine was in the pre-diabetic range (5.8%) and it left me trying to figure it out what I needed to do to lower it. Dr. Manisha Ghei of Praana Integrative Medicine & Holistic Health Center, PLLC told me that, HbA1C is a test of hemoglobin glycation and hemoglobin is present inside our Red Blood Cells (RBCs). Our RBCs regenerate every 120 days so it will take A1C approximately 3 months to change. A1c is a test of average long-term blood sugar control over the three months prior to the date of the blood test. Think about what you eat over the course of 3 months. Do you have a few bad days where you emotionally eat or go on a chocolate and fried food binge? No? Just me? Well for those of you not in the big fat l Continue reading >>

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