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A1c 7.3 Average Blood Sugar

Normal Range For Blood Sugar Two Hours After Eating

Normal Range For Blood Sugar Two Hours After Eating

Your blood glucose levels can determine whether you have or are at risk for developing diabetes, a condition in which your body no longer effectively processes and absorbs glucose from the bloodstream. Blood glucose levels fluctuate during the day, particularly after meals. Postprandial -- which means after eating -- glucose levels that rise beyond a certain level may mean you have diabetes or prediabetes. However, two-hour postprandial blood sugar testing is not recommended to screen for or diagnose diabetes. Video of the Day Two to 3 hours after eating a meal, blood glucose levels typically fall to normal fasting levels. For people without diabetes, this is typically 125 mg/dL or less, according to criteria established by the American Diabetes Association. If your 2-hour postprandial blood glucose level is higher than 125 mg/dL, your doctor will likely order one of the ADA-recommended blood tests for diagnosing diabetes. The options include a hemoglobin A1c test and an oral glucose tolerance test. Before developing type 2 diabetes, many people go through a phase called "prediabetes." With this condition, postprandial blood sugar levels are typically abnormally high -- but not elevated enough to meet the criteria for a diagnosis of diabetes. Modest weight loss, increased physical activity and dietary changes can often prevent prediabetes from progressing to type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Atorvastatin Lowers Cholesterol But Raises Blood Sugar

Atorvastatin Lowers Cholesterol But Raises Blood Sugar

As many as 40 million people may be taking statin-type cholesterol-lowering drugs daily in the U.S. Although medications like atorvastatin, lovastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin can bring cholesterol levels down dramatically they can also raise blood glucose levels or make diabetes harder to control as this reader relates: Q. I used to have good blood sugar readings when I was on glyburide. Since I was put on atorvastatin to lower cholesterol I have had trouble with high blood sugar. I read in your Guide to Managing Diabetes that statins can affect blood glucose but the clinical pharmacist at the VA said you are wrong. She insisted that atorvastatin does not affect HbA1c or blood sugar. They now have me on both glipizide and Onglyza and the clinical pharmacist admitted that my HbA1c will not come down. She still insists I have to keep taking these medicines even if they are not working to control my diabetes. A. We are puzzled that your pharmacist was not aware of the official prescribing information for atorvastatin (Lipitor): “Increases in HbA1c and fasting serum glucose levels have been reported with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors [statins], including LIPITOR.” HbA1c is a measure of how high blood sugar levels have been over the past three months. Clinical trials and other studies have shown that statins can indeed raise blood sugar levels, making it harder to control diabetes. Blood Sugar and Statins: There is general agreement that statin therapy increases the risk of developing diabetes (Current Atherosclerosis Reports, Jan. 2015). Research has shown that there is a 10 to 12 percent increased incidence of new-onset type 2 diabetes in statin takers. The higher the dose and the more potent the statin the greater the risk. Investigators believe tha Continue reading >>

Hba1c Test Results Don't Tell The Full Story

Hba1c Test Results Don't Tell The Full Story

back to Overview When I was a teenager, the HbA1c test results cut straight through my lies and made-up paper logbook. It’s often viewed as the number to rule all numbers. But hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test results can be misleading and don’t tell the full story. As I learned in my teens, the HbA1c test shines a light on things I was trying to hide. Overall, It’s not good at getting to the details of blood sugars, but when used with other pieces of information it can draw attention to (sometimes unseen) problem areas in our diabetes management, and that’s a good thing. How do HbA1c test results work? Let’s take a quick look at the basics of the HbA1c test. A certain amount of sugar in your blood sticks to your red blood cells and can’t be unstuck. It’s there for the life of the cell, which is, on average, about 8-12 weeks. Those red blood cells in your body are constantly recycled, and by checking your HbA1c value every 8-12 weeks (or as often as recommended by your doctor – the ADA recommends at least twice a year), you get to see a fresh new grouping of them. So – A higher blood sugar for a longer time means more sugar on more cells – which means a higher HbA1c. Get it? Ideal HbA1c range HbA1c goals are very individual, which makes sense. We’re all different, right? Of course, there are reference values as a guide, and that’s a good place to start. The ADA suggests an HbA1c of 7%, but also say that “more or less stringent glycemic goals may be appropriate for each individual.” Why have different goals? Because, as you know, there’s a lot to consider with diabetes. Avoiding lows (hypoglycemia) while pushing for lower A1c’s is really important because low blood sugars are immediately dangerous. It’s simply not safe to push for a very low H Continue reading >>

Lifesaving Lessons: Diabetes Self-management Classes Help Lower Dangerous Blood Sugar Levels

Lifesaving Lessons: Diabetes Self-management Classes Help Lower Dangerous Blood Sugar Levels

Texas is expected to have nearly eight million residents suffering from diabetes by the year 2040, according to a 2010 report released by the Texas Health Institute, State Demographer’s Office and Methodist Healthcare Ministries of South Texas. In response to this epidemic, the Texas A&M Health Science Center Coastal Bend Health Education Center (CBHEC) Diabetes Education Program provides resources to residents and health professionals of the Coastal Bend on how to prevent and control this disease. This program, accredited by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), educates the public about diabetes as a disease. Diabetes self-management classes provide support to prevent onset of type 2 diabetes and to keep the disease under control once diagnosed. In addition, community events offer programs to schools and workplaces across the Coastal Bend. This year, a total of 3,227 people were touched by the efforts of the program. Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is a critical part of care for those with diabetes and, according to the ADA, is necessary in order to improve patient outcomes. CBHEC’S Diabetes Education DSME classes are offered in English and Spanish to provide guidance with blood glucose monitoring, medication and insulin administration, nutrition support, and physical activity opportunities. Attendance has increased drastically over the life of the program with 1,276 attending in 2013. Health professionals use the Hemoglobin A1C test to assess a person’s average blood glucose (blood sugar) levels over the past two to three months. It does this by measuring the percent of hemoglobin (the protein in our red blood cells that carry oxygen) that has glucose attached to it. For people without diabetes, the normal range for the A1C test is between 4% and 5 Continue reading >>

Management Of Persistent Hyperglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Management Of Persistent Hyperglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The content on the UpToDate website is not intended nor recommended as a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your own physician or other qualified health care professional regarding any medical questions or conditions. The use of this website is governed by the UpToDate Terms of Use ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. All topics are updated as new evidence becomes available and our peer review process is complete. INTRODUCTION — Initial treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus includes education, with emphasis on lifestyle changes including diet, exercise, and weight reduction when appropriate. Monotherapy with metformin is indicated for most patients, and insulin may be indicated for initial treatment for some [1]. Although several studies have noted remissions of type 2 diabetes mellitus that may last several years, most patients require continuous treatment in order to maintain normal or near-normal glycemia. Bariatric surgical procedures in obese patients that result in major weight loss have been shown to lead to remission in a substantial fraction of patients. Regardless of the initial response to therapy, the natural history of most patients with type 2 diabetes is for blood glucose concentrations to rise gradually with time. Treatment for hyperglycemia that fails to respond to initial monotherapy and long-term pharmacologic therapy in type 2 diabetes is reviewed here. Options for initial therapy and other therapeutic issues in diabetes management, such as the frequency of monitoring and evaluation for microvascular and macrovascular complications, are discussed separately. (See "Initial management of blood glucose in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus" and "Overview of medical care in adults with diabetes mellitus". Continue reading >>

Elevated Blood Sugar Shrinks The Brain

Elevated Blood Sugar Shrinks The Brain

Studies have demonstrated that there is a direct correlation between changes in size of the brains memory center, the hippocampus, and declining memory function. So it’s obviously in our great interest to do everything we possibly can to preserve the size of hippocampus, which is to say, prevent hippocampal atrophy. It has become clear that there is a powerful direct relationship between not only fasting blood sugar, but even average blood sugar, in terms of predicting the rate at which the hippocampus will shrink and therefore memory will decline. In a new report, recently published in the journal Neurology, researchers in Germany evaluated a group of 141 individuals, average age 63 years, with memory testing as well as a specific type of MRI scan of the brain to measure the size of the hippocampus in each participant. At the same time they looked at blood sugar levels as well as average blood sugar, by assessing a blood test called hemoglobin A1 c. What these researchers discovered was really quite profound. There was a perfect correlation between having lower blood sugar as well as lower average blood sugar as measured by an A1c test and several markers of brain function. As the authors stated “lower A1c and glucose levels were significantly associated with better scores in delayed recall, learning ability, and memory consolidation.” They found that the average blood sugar, the A1c “strongly associated with memory performance.” The authors also were able to draw a conclusion between blood sugar and reduction in size of the hippocampus. The conclusion of the research stated “our results indicate that even in the absence of manifest type II diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance, chronically higher blood glucose levels exert a negative influence on Continue reading >>

Afrezza Review: Diabetics Confirm Its Advantages

Afrezza Review: Diabetics Confirm Its Advantages

Afrezza is a new FDA approved super-rapid inhalable meal-time insulin that has been available since early 2015. So far, the experiences and reviews of Afrezza users (Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics) have confirmed that Afrezza has many advantages (over rapid-acting analog insulin (RAAs)). Here are some of these advantages (for discussion of the side effects of Afrezza, please refer to this article: Afrezza: Side Effect): Spontaneousness (meaning one can enjoy more varieties of food (and in general, life)) Other advantages (no smell, no taste; real human insulin – not an modified analogue; better compliance) 1. Better A1Cs Look at Gustavo Basualdos result before and after Afrezza: from 6.5 to 5.4 A1C in 90 days. Yeah baby!!! Best A1C in my 20+years of #T1D.From 6.5 to 5.4. And with little effort.Take that #diabetes! #afrezza pic.twitter.com/1mcUOazl63 In just 60 days being on Afrezza, Howard dropped his A1C from 7.4 to 6.4 Okay just got my first official A1c after only 60 DAYS on Afrezza. Dropped an entire point!!!Went from a 7.4 to a 6.4. #afrezza — AFREZZA GUY (@Afrezzaguy) June 5, 2015 You can trust us!! #afrezza #sanofiUS Here to get info out and help as many as possible feel the way we all doNORMAL pic.twitter.com/7rIczAO2GU — AFREZZA GUY (@Afrezzaguy) June 6, 2015 Spiro had an A1C of 7.1 before Afrezza and after ~90 days of using Afrezza dropped to a 6.2 Latest A1c result after 90 days on #afrezza, 4 units at meals with no other diabetes meds. From 7.1 to 6.2. pic.twitter.com/nbgBwVjwSu — Afrezza Spiro (@SpiroHere) June 11, 2015 Julie went from a 7.3 to a 6.3 A1C March A1c 7.3 now 6.3 !! Started afrezza 4/11.. #afrezzanumbersdontlie. WOW So happy — Julie (@julie007_y) June 22, 2015 Brian Lynch dropped his A1C from 7.6 to 6.5 in ~75 days on Afrezza. Just rec'd Continue reading >>

Diabetes: A Battle For Control

Diabetes: A Battle For Control

Simply put, diabetes is a contest between people and their blood. For people whose bodies don't produce enough insulin to manage their blood sugar, the goal is a normal blood score, achieved through a balancing act of lifestyle and medication. "Eventually most patients will follow a course of lifestyle, medications, then insulin," said Dr. Enrico Cagliero, referring to people diagnosed with the most common form of diabetes, known as Type 2. He's an endocrinologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. "Overall about 30% of all diabetics are on insulin, but, given the progressive nature of the disease, close to 60% can expect to be on it eventually." To buck that trend, some of these diabetics, with the help of physicians who share their mission, are adopting rigorous diet and exercise regimens to get off insulin, or never have to go on it. Unlike Type 1 diabetics, who have no choice but to take insulin, Type 2 diabetics still produce some of the hormone -- and more than a few are determined to make the most of it. Dr. Wei-An "Andy" Lee, an endocrinologist and assistant professor at USC's Keck School of Medicine, is a firm supporter of this approach. He's among a handful of physicians using radical lifestyle changes to get insulin-dependent patients off insulin. "I wish more doctors and patients would not assume insulin injections are their only option," he said. "I don't see why more don't give lifestyle a try. It's better for the patient, costs less than medications or surgery, and is better for the country." Newer non-insulin medications, specifically ones that boost incretins (hormones found in the digestive tract), along with strict diets can help patients actually reverse their disease and ditch the insulin Continue reading >>

High Sugar Levels After Breakfast

High Sugar Levels After Breakfast

Ron_C over a year ago On On the morning of March 11th, my glucose reading before breakfast was 6.3 (mmol/L). Two hours after breakfast, my glucose reading before breakfast rose to 7.3. I had a cup of coffee with 1% milk & stevia and All-Bran cereal with mixed nuts, blueberries and 1 % milk. On the morning of March 12th, my glucose reading before breakfast was 5.9. Two hours after breakfast, my glucose reading before breakfast rose to 6.8. I had a cup of coffee with 1% milk & stevia, omelet, and 1 slice of whole rye bread (contained 2 grams of sugar) with almond butter (no sugar). I've tried decaf green tea on other occasions instead of coffee but the glucose readings are consistently close to 7 or over. My readings after supper are normally below 6. Why can I not get my readings 2 hours after breakfast below 6? What am I doing wrong? Any suggestions to get my breakfast readings below 6 would be greatly appreciated. Legend 18316 posts Hi Ron, Your levels are actually very good, and consistent. Normal levels would be 4 - 7 mmol/l before a meal, under 10 mmol/l about 90 minutes after eating, and about 8 mmol/l at bedtime. It's normal for your glucose levels to be higher after breakfast. Are you on insulin or being treated for diabetes? Check with your doctor. Ron_C over a year ago Thank you for your reply. I do not take insulin or any diabetes medications. Based on my last blood test (December 2011), my fasting glucose was 7.3 (mmol/L) which is onside the normal range. I am very concerned that I may become (if I'm not already there) a Type 2 diabete. For this reason, I have been monitoring my sugar levels the last three weeks (2 hours before breakfast and supper, and recently just before breakfast). My results have been all over the map. I'm 62 years old with high blood pr Continue reading >>

Target For Glycemic Control

Target For Glycemic Control

Go to: IMPORTANCE OF THE FOUR-POINT DIURNAL GLYCEMIC PROFILE A tool for integrating the different periods of daytime Whereas many physicians continue to emphasize fasting glucose and A1C to guide management of diabetes, observational studies have indicated that glucose testing at postprandial and postabsorptive time points could play an important role (5,6). For instance, lessons from physiology tell us that humans spend half of their lives in postprandial states (7,8). The postprandial state, with respect to glucose, is defined as a 4-h period that immediately follows ingestion of a meal (7). During this period, dietary carbohydrates are progressively hydrolyzed through several sequential enzymatic actions. Even though the insulin response rapidly reduces the postprandial glucose excursion with a return to baseline levels within <2 h, the overall period of absorption has approximately a 4-h duration that corresponds to the postprandial state. The postabsorptive state consists of a 6-h period that follows the postprandial period. During this time interval, glucose concentrations remain within a normal range in nondiabetic individuals through the breakdown of the glycogen (glycogenolysis) stored during the postprandial period. The “real” fasting state commences only at the end of the postabsorptive period (∼10–12 h after the beginning of the last meal intake). During the fasting state, plasma glucose is maintained at a near-normal level by the gluconeogenesis: glucose derived from lactate, alanine, and glycerol. Therefore, it appears that in a nondiabetic patient who takes three meals per day at relatively fixed hours, the 24-h period of the day can be divided into three periods corresponding to fasting, postprandial, and postabsorptive states. The postprandial p Continue reading >>

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

As a type 2 diabetic, you've probably heard of Metformin, or you might even be taking it yourself. Metformin (brand name “Glucophage” aka “glucose-eater”) is the most commonly prescribed medication for type 2 diabetes worldwide…and for good reason. It is one of the safest, most effective, least costly medication available with minimal, if any, side effects. There are always lots of questions around Metformin – how does metformin lower blood sugar, does metformin promote weight loss or weight gain, will it give me side effects – and lots more. Today we'll hopefully answer some of those questions. How Metformin Works Metformin belongs to a class of medications known as “Biguanides,” which lower blood glucose by decreasing the amount of sugar put out by the liver. The liver normally produces glucose throughout the day in conjunction with the pancreas’ production of insulin to maintain stable blood sugar. In many people with diabetes, both mechanisms are altered in that the pancreas puts out less insulin while the liver is unable to shut down production of excess glucose. This means your body is putting out as much as 3 times as much sugar than that of nondiabetic individuals, resulting in high levels of glucose in the bloodstream. Metformin effectively shuts down this excess production resulting in less insulin required. As a result, less sugar is available for absorption by the muscles and conversion to fat. Additionally, a lower need for insulin slows the progression of insulin resistance and keeps cells sensitive to endogenous insulin (that made by the body). Since metformin doesn’t cause the body to generate more insulin, it does not cause hypoglycemia unless combined with a sulfonylurea or insulin injection. Metformin is one of the few oral diabe Continue reading >>

High Hemoglobin A1c Levels Within The Non-diabetic Range Are Associated With The Risk Of All Cancers

High Hemoglobin A1c Levels Within The Non-diabetic Range Are Associated With The Risk Of All Cancers

Previous studies have reported associations between diabetes and cancer risk. However, specific association of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels with cancer risk remains inconclusive. We followed 29,629 individuals (11,336 men; 18,293 women) aged 46–80 years who participated in the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study who had HbA1c measurements available and were cancer-free at baseline. Cancer incidence was assessed by systemic surveys. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for cancer risk with adjustment for age sex, geographic area, body mass index, smoking status, physical activity, alcohol, coffee, vegetable and total energy consumption, and history of cardiovascular disease. After a median follow-up of 8.5 years, 1,955 individuals had developed cancer. Higher HbA1c levels within both the non-diabetic and diabetic ranges in individuals without known diabetes were associated with overall cancer risk. Compared with individuals without known diabetes and HbA1c levels of 5.0–5.4%, the HRs for all cancers were 1.27 (95% confidence interval, 1.07–1.52); 1.01 (0.90–1.14); 1.28 (1.09–1.49); and 1.43 (1.14–1.80) for individuals without known diabetes and HbA1c levels <5.0%, 5.5–5.9%, 6.0–6.4%, and ≥6.5%, respectively, and 1.23 (1.02–1.47) for individuals with known diabetes. The lowest HbA1c group had the highest risk of liver cancer, and HbA1c levels were linearly associated with the risk of all cancers after excluding liver cancer (P for linear trend, 0.004). In conclusion, our findings corroborate the notion that glycemic control in individuals with high HbA1c levels may be important not only to prevent diabetes but also to prevent cancer. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that diabetes is associated with an increased risk of cancer.[1, 2] In 2010, Continue reading >>

The A1c Test And Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

The A1c Test And Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice or diagnosis from a physician. In the United States, about 1 in 10 people have diabetes, a disease that affects the way the body produces or uses insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate glucose (sugar) in the blood. When blood sugar levels get too high, health problems can develop, including kidney problems. In fact, about half of all people diagnosed with diabetes will develop kidney disease. Persistently high sugar levels can damage the small blood vessels in the body. In the kidneys, diabetes can also cause damage to the tiny filters called glomeruli that filter the blood. The result is that your kidneys may begin to leak protein into the urine, and can become unable to properly eliminate the water, salt and waste products from your body. Another complication of diabetes is nerve damage, often causing burning and numbness in the feet. However, it can sometimes also lead to trouble emptying the bladder. Pressure from a full bladder that doesn’t empty properly can further damage the kidneys. What is the A1C test? The A1C, or hemoglobin A1C test, is used to measure long-term blood glucose levels. It is typically given every three to six months to people with diabetes. This laboratory test shows the person’s average blood glucose control for the previous two to three months. It differs from the finger stick blood test that is used daily to monitor current blood sugar levels. For someone with diabetes, the goal is to have an A1C reading of less than 7.0 percent. For someone who is not diabetic, a normal A1C level is 4.0 percent to 5.9 percent. Research has shown that when A1C levels are close to normal, the risk for complications of diabetes Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) present in the blood of a human or an animal. The body naturally tightly regulates blood glucose levels (with the help of insulin that is secreted by pancreas) as a part of metabolic homeostasis. If blood sugar levels are either increased or decreased by a greater margin than expected this might indicate a medical condition. Diabetic patients must monitor their blood sugar levels as body’s inability to properly utilize and / or produce insulin can pose a serious threat to their health. Navigation: Definition: What is blood sugar? What is diabetes? Diagnosis: Diabetes symptoms Levels and indication Normal blood sugar levels Low blood sugar levels High blood sugar levels Managing: How to lower blood sugar level? Children blood sugar levels Blood sugar levels chart Checking for BS: How to check blood sugar? Treatment: How to lower blood sugar level? Can diabetes be cured? Accessories Diabetic Socks Diabetic Shoes What is blood sugar? What does it mean when someone refers to blood sugar level in your body? Blood sugar level (or blood sugar concentration) is the amount of glucose (a source of energy) present in your blood at any given time. A normal blood glucose level for a healthy person is somewhere between 72 mg/dL (3.8 to 4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (5.8 to 6 mmol/L). It, of course, depends on every individual alone. Blood sugar levels might fluctuate due to other reasons (such as exercise, stress and infection). Typically blood sugar level in humans is around 72 mg/dL (or 4 mmol/L). After a meal the blood sugar level may increase temporarily up to 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L). This is normal. A blood sugar level between 72 mg/dL (4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (6 mmol/L) is considered normal for a h Continue reading >>

Progress Towards Reversal And The Ogtt

Progress Towards Reversal And The Ogtt

Here are the steps that you will go through on your way to reversal... 1. Firstly get your fasting sugardown to below 6.0 mmo/l (108 mg/dl). This is done by not eating things that put your blood sugar up and by exercise. After this, keep your sugar that low as follows... a. Measure the effect of a 45 minute walk (or other 200kcal exercise burn) on your blood sugar. With me it reduced my sugar by around 1.2 - 1.4 mmol/l starting from 6 to 7 mmol/l. b. Measure your sugar just before you get ready to go to bed. End of day sugar and beginning of day sugar are about the same normally - see the graph below. c. Do the amount of walking or other exercise required to bring your sugar down to below 6.0. Then go to bed (checking the result occasionally until you are confident) d. You should also wake up with a fasting sugar below 6. e. Do this every night, adjusting the walk accordingly, until your morning sugar is 5.8 mmol/l (104mg/dl) or below on a regular basis. f. Doing this will speed up recovery from Diabetic Neuralgia. 2. By doing 40 mins on the treadmill after every meal (20 minutes of sugar reducing moderately fast walking and 20 mins of glycogen burning very fast walking) and 20 minutes of moderately fast sugar reducing walking before bed and by eating nothing with more than 10% carbohydrate by weight, get your fasting sugar down to below 5.3 mmol/l 95 mg/dl. 3. Once your fasting sugar has reached 5.3 mmol/l, 95 mg/dl, or better, then you can start measuring your cerebral sugar addiction/available glycogen storage space with the ONTT. Type2 is caused by a lack of Glycogen storage space in your muscles which is caused by an over production of glucose in the liver which is caused by instruction from the brain to the liver to get me more glucose! Because the brain is subcon Continue reading >>

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