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7 Symptoms Of Pancreas Problems

Silent Killers! 10 Cancers That Can Show No Signs Or Symptoms

Silent Killers! 10 Cancers That Can Show No Signs Or Symptoms

Silent Killers! 10 Cancers That Can Show No Signs or Symptoms While you may think visiting the doctor yearly and getting your routine check-up should be enough to prevent cancers of all types, the truth is that many cancers can be tough to catch early no matter the preventative measures taken. Eating nutritious foods , knowing your family history, and getting plenty of physical activity is a great start for preventing cancer. But knowing exactly what signs and symptoms to look out for, even if you think your health and lifestyle is top-notch, can be life-saving. The following 10 cancers can show no signs or symptoms. You can have pancreatic cancer and not even know it. | Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images The pancreas itself is a small organ that rests within the abdomen, and in general, its uses vary from helping with the digestion of food to secreting hormones that help with maintaining proper blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most difficult to diagnose because many people dont experience symptoms during the early stages.According to the American Society of Clinical Oncology , there are also no reliable tests for people who may have this cancer if there are no symptoms present. Some symptoms of pancreatic cancer include pain in the upper abdomen or upper back, the swelling of extremities due to a blood clot, bloated stomach, weakness, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, chills, fever, and weight loss. Because pancreatic cancer prevents the body from properlydigesting fats, those with the disease may have abnormal stool. Many of these symptoms could easily be seen as a bad stomach virus setting in or even the flu, though, thus making the beginning stages of pancreatic cancer very difficult to detect. When the cancer begins to spread, jaundice i Continue reading >>

Help For Symptoms Of Pancreas Problems And Promoting Pancreas Health

Help For Symptoms Of Pancreas Problems And Promoting Pancreas Health

Select a Topic What is the Pancreas? The pancreas is a large organ approximately six inches long and is a key part of the digestive and endocrine systems. It is located deep within the upper abdomen, surrounded by the stomach, small intestine, liver and spleen. This organ is shaped like a pear, broad at one end and narrow at the other end. It is divided in three sections – the broad end of the pancreas is called the head, the midsection is called the body and the narrow end is called the tail. If pancreas health is compromised a number of serious disorders can occur within the body. Functions of the Pancreas The first function belongs to the exocrine pancreas. The pancreas produces digestive juices and enzymes to help digest fats and proteins. When food has been partially digested by the stomach, it is pushed into the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). Secreting its enzymes into the duodenum helps to prevent the protein-digesting enzyme known as trypsin from eating the protein-based pancreas or its duct. Pancreatic digestive juices and enzymes are released through a small duct attached to the duodenum to mix with the food. The exocrine pancreas also produces enzymes that break down carbohydrates (amylase) and fats (lipase) as well as sodium bicarbonate which helps to neutralize the stomach acids in food. The second function belongs to the endocrine pancreas. The pancreas produces the hormone insulin together with a variety of other hormones. Insulin helps to control the body’s blood sugar (glucose) levels. It is produced by small groups of pancreatic cells called the Islets of Langerhans, which are also known as the "islet cells" Insulin is secreted when your blood sugar is raised and it causes the muscles and other bodily tissues to take up glucose f Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis In Dogs

Pancreatitis In Dogs

From 367 quotes ranging from $800 - 6,000 Documentation has shown that pancreatitis typically affects dogs who are over the age of five. Many of the dogs who get this disease are obese or overweight. Miniature Schnauzers seem to be especially predisposed to pancreatitis though studies have shown that Yorkshire Terriers, Poodles, Dachshunds, and Cocker Spaniels commonly become afflicted with the illness. The disease can prove fatal if left untreated. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas, an organ close to the stomach. The pancreas produces enzymes that aid in food digestion and hormone regulation. When pancreatitis occurs, it is because the enzymes have prematurely become activated while still in the pancreas, instead of in the digestive system where normal activity takes place. Inflammation of the pancreas can result in secondary damage to other organs of the body. Symptoms will vary tremendously depending on the severity of the pancreatitis. Because the condition can rapidly deteriorate, a veterinary visit is imperative if your dog is showing any of the following signs. Pancreatitis can be classified in two ways. This is the more common form of pancreatic inflammation in canines Several attacks can lead to the chronic form The acute case is often more easily treated This form can remain undiagnosed due to mild signs and nonspecific test results This leads to a continuous, progressive inflammation Treating your pet for pancreatitis is imperative because your canine family member may suffer greatly without a resolution. There are many underlying causes for pancreatitis, as well as a myriad of complications that can arise due to the illness. High level of calcium in the blood (hypercalcemia) Consumption of a large amount of fatty food a short time, or ingestion o Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis - A Patient's Guide - Family Doctor

Pancreatitis - A Patient's Guide - Family Doctor

A detailed article outlining the causes and treatment of this condition. Pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas, which is an organ within the upper abdomen responsible for the production of insulin and glucagon (which are released into the blood stream) and for certain enzymes necessary for the digestion of food (e.g. lipase), which are released via the pancreatic duct into the upper small bowel, where they aid the breakdown of food. Pancreatitis is described as acute or chronic. Acute pancreatitis is a condition from which the sufferer (usually) recovers, because the condition is self-limited and the pancreatic tissue returns to normal; nevertheless, acute pancreatitis may recur after a period of full recovery. In contrast, with chronic pancreatitis the pancreatic tissue never returns to its normal state and the sufferer has ongoing illness and continued symptoms. It may be difficult in the first instance to distinguish between a case of acute pancreatitis and the first manifestations of chronic pancreatitis. Most cases (about 80%) of acute pancreatitis are caused by either gallstones or excessive alcohol intake. In about 10% of cases the cause is unknown (though probably related to barely detectable, tiny gallstones or 'sludge'). There are many other conditions that are associated with acute pancreatitis, including various prescription drugs, cardiac or major abdominal surgery, trauma, peptic ulcer disease, infections, and raised blood calcium or lipid levels. Each year 1-2 people per 100,000 develop acute pancreatitis in the UK, but the incidence in the USA is reportedly much higher (20 people per 100,000 per year). For unknown reasons, the various causes of acute pancreatitis result in 'autodigestion' of the pancreas, as its enzymes are activated within th Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis Symptoms: 11 Natural Ways To Prevent & Manage

Pancreatitis Symptoms: 11 Natural Ways To Prevent & Manage

Every year in the United States 210,000 people are admitted to hospitals with acute pancreatitis and 56,000 people are hospitalized each year due to chronic pancreatitis. This is a serious condition that can result in death if not treated properly and promptly. (1, 2) The symptoms of pancreatitis depend on whether it is an acute or chronic case. Acute cases come on rapidly and can be the result of heavy drinking, gallstones or even blunt force trauma from an accident. Acute pancreatitis can be life-threatening, but with proper medical intervention and treatment the majority of people recover. However, recurrences can happen and it is possible for acute pancreatitis to become chronic. Chronic cases develop more slowly and last a lifetime. This type can be the result of alcohol abuse, hereditary, certain prescription medications and even a deficiency in key nutrients. With chronic pancreatitis, there is physical scarring of the pancreas that can put you at a greater risk for developing diabetes, digestive disorders and even pancreatic cancer. Diagnosing this condition requires a thorough examination and often multiple tests. The severity and the type will determine the course of action. For acute cases, a few days on clear liquids may resolve the problem, while more severe cases may require surgical intervention. For chronic pancreatitis, adjusting the diet and finding ways to manage the pain and discomfort is typical. However, antibiotics, IV hydration and nutritional support may be required. Natural treatments can help with pancreatitis symptoms and may help prevent future episodes. And there are even some natural treatments that may help protect against pancreatic cancer. What Is Pancreatitis? Pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas, which is a small organ tuck Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis

What is the pancreas? The pancreas is a large gland in the abdomen located behind the stomach and next to the upper part of the small intestine (the duodenum). The pancreas has two main jobs: It discharges powerful digestive enzymes into the small intestine to aid the digestion of carbohydrates, proteins, and fat. It releases the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. These hormones are involved in blood glucose (sugar) metabolism, regulating how the body stores and uses food for energy. What is pancreatitis? Pancreatitis is a rare disease in which the pancreas becomes inflamed. Pancreatic damage occurs when the digestive enzymes are activated and begin attacking the pancreas. In very severe cases, pancreatitis can result in bleeding into the gland, serious tissue damage, infection, and cyst formation. Severe pancreatitis can also cause damage if enzymes and toxins are released into the bloodstream, which can harm other vital organs such as the heart, lungs, and kidneys. Pancreatitis develops gradually and tends to become progressively worse. There are two forms of pancreatitis: acute and chronic. What causes pancreatitis? Acute pancreatitis is a sudden inflammation of the pancreas that occurs over a short period of time. In more than 80% of the cases, acute pancreatitis is caused by bile duct stones or heavy alcohol use. Other causes include: Medications High triglyceride levels Infections Trauma Metabolic disorders Surgery In about 10-15% of the cases, the cause of acute pancreatitis is unknown. The severity of acute pancreatitis may range from mild abdominal (belly) discomfort to a severe, life-threatening illness. However, the majority of patients with acute pancreatitis (greater than 80%) recover completely after receiving the appropriate treatment. Ch Continue reading >>

Chronic Pancreatitis

Chronic Pancreatitis

What is pancreatitis? Any inflammation of the pancreas is called pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis results in severe inflammation of the gland. Patients may be seriously unwell. Chronic pancreatitis develops either as the result of repeated attacks of acute pancreatitis or as the result of other injuries to the pancreas (see below). However, occasionally chronic pancreatitis can occur with no previous problems or symptoms and may be related to certain genetic mutations. It's thought that the damage to the pancreas occurs as the result of digestive enzymes leaking into the pancreas and starting to digest it. This sets up inflammation, and when the inflammation settles, the scarring process distorts the pancreas making further attacks of inflammation likely. Thus a vicious cycle develops. As a result of prolonged damage to the pancreas, the pancreas fails to produce enough digestive enzymes to permit adequate digestion of food particularly fat which is difficult to absorb. This leads to weight loss and the frequent passage of pale greasy stools that contain excess amounts of fat. Further, the destruction of the cells which produce insulin may lead to the development of diabetes. What is the pancreas? The pancreas is an elongated gland situated at the back of the upper abdominal cavity behind the stomach. It's divided into the head (through which the common bile duct runs as it enters the duodenum from the liver) and the body (which extends across the spine) and the tail. The tail of the pancreas is close to the left kidney and to the spleen. Because the pancreas lies at the back of the abdominal cavity, diseases of the pancreas may be difficult to diagnose. What does the pancreas do? The pancreas has two main functions. An exocrine function into the gut producing a series Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cancer: What Are The Symptoms Of 'silent Killer' Set To Kill More Than Breast Tumours?

Pancreatic Cancer: What Are The Symptoms Of 'silent Killer' Set To Kill More Than Breast Tumours?

INDYPULSE Pancreatic cancer: What are the symptoms of 'silent killer' set to kill more than breast tumours? Pancreatic cancer will claim an increasing number of lives over the next decade and overtake breast cancer to become the fourth most deadly form of the disease overall, a charity has warned. It is often difficult to diagnose pancreatic cancer early enough to stop it from spreading, because the symptoms are so vague. A lack of new diagnosis methods means that by 2026, 11,279 people are predicted to die every year from the disease – a 28 per cent rise on the 8,817 in 2014, said Pancreatic Cancer UK. The only live-saving treatment available for pancreatic cancer is an operation to remove the tumour. However, in 92 per cent of cases, the cancer is not caught early enough for surgery, meaning it has the lowest survival rate of all cancers. The signs of pancreatic cancer, sometimes called the 'silent killer', may come and go at first. These are the most common symptoms. Jaundice Anyone with jaundice – yellow skin and whites of the eyes – should see their GP straight away. People who develop jaundice may also feel itchy and notice pale faeces and dark urine. The yellow pigmentation is caused by a build-up of a substance called bilirubin. It can also be caused by non-cancerous conditions such as hepatitis and gallstones, but should always be taken seriously and everyone over 40 with the condition is referred to a specialist for testing. Abdominal pain The pancreas is a large gland buried deep inside the body and a common symptom of pancreatic cancer is pain the tummy area, which can come and go and spread to the back. The pain is often worse when lying down or after eating. Unexplained weight loss and loss of appetite Sudden, unintentional weight loss can be the sig Continue reading >>

Risks Associated With Canine Acute Pancreatitis

Risks Associated With Canine Acute Pancreatitis

The pancreas has many functions, including the production and secretion of digestive enzymes and the production of insulin. Digestive enzymes are critical for food digestion, while insulin aids in the control of the metabolism and blood-sugar levels.Pancreatitis means inflammation of the pancreas and acute means sudden. When the pancreas becomes inflamed, digestive enzymes that are normally inactive until they reach the small intestine become active in the pancreas insteadresulting in pain and swelling as the pancreas actually begins to digest itself. There are many suggested causes of acute pancreatitis including: obesity, high-fat diets, endocrine diseases such as hypothyroidism, and various medicationsor toxins. Even if your dog doesnt normally eat a high-fat diet, the introduction of a large amount of fatty food all at once can cause acute pancreatitis. Veterinarians see an increase in pancreatitis around the holidays, since many people think a nice way to celebrate is to share their holiday meals with their dog. In addition, dogs that get into garbage are much more likely to develop pancreatitis, so be sure to keep your trash out of your dogs reach!Pancreatitis can occur in any dog, but some breeds are more susceptible to this disease. They include the miniature schnauzer , miniature poodle, and cocker spaniel . Additionally, pancreatitis is more common in middle-age to older dogs, overweight dogs, and females. The most common symptoms of acute pancreatitis in dogs are loss of appetite, vomiting, and abdominal pain.Other symptoms you may notice include: Your veterinarian will take a complete history and perform a thorough physical exam. Additionally, diagnostic tests will be required to identify if your dog has acute pancreatitis. These may include: Chemistry test Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Acute Pancreatitis

What You Should Know About Acute Pancreatitis

What you should know about acute pancreatitis What you should know about acute pancreatitis If a patient presents with nausea and epigastric pain, the cause may well be acute pancreatitis. Here is how the condition is diagnosed and treated. Acute pancreatitis is generally managed in a hospital setting, but its symptoms can prompt a visit to the primary-care clinician for initial diagnosis. A pathologic inflammatory condition involving both the pancreas and surrounding tissues, acute pancreatitis results in more than 200,000 hospital admissions annually in the United States.1 For 75%-85% of patients, however, pancreatitis has a mild clinical course that usually resolves in five to seven days.2 Fewer than 1% of those with mild pancreatitis die as a result of the pathology, but the mortality for patients with severe disease approaches 30%.1 The annual cost of acute pancreatitis is estimated to be more than $3 billion.3 Pancreatitis has a unique pathologic mechanism largely related to the fact that the pancreas serves a dual function as the body's only combination endocrine/exocrine gland. In addition to the endocrine function involved in the release of insulin and glucagon for maintenance of serum glucose, the organ also manufactures, stores, and excretes enzymes that are ultimately released into the proximal small intestine to aid in the digestion of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins.4 These enzymes include amylase, lipase, and trypsin. Amylase and lipase digest carbohydrates and fats, respectively, but the most abundant enzyme is trypsin, which is necessary for the digestion of proteins.3 Since the pancreas itself is composed largely of proteins and, to a lesser extent, fats, the enzymes are stored in an inactive form to prevent them from digesting the pancreatic and pe Continue reading >>

Inflammation Of The Pancreas In Cats

Inflammation Of The Pancreas In Cats

Select a stage on the timeline to view more content. The pancreas is part of the endocrine and digestive system, which is integral for the digestion of foods, producing the enzymes that digest food, and producing insulin. When the pancreas becomes inflamed, the flow of enzymes into the digestive tract can become disrupted, forcing the enzymes out of the pancreas and into the abdominal area. If this occurs, the digestive enzymes will begin to break down fat and proteins in the other organs, as well as in the pancreas. In effect, the body begins to digest itself. Because of their proximity to the pancreas, the kidney and liver can also be affected when this progression takes place, and the abdomen will become inflamed, and possibly infected as well. If bleeding occurs in the pancreas, shock, and even death can follow. Inflammation of the pancreas (or pancreatitis) often progresses rapidly in cats, but can often be treated without any permanent damage to the organ. However, if pancreatitis goes long-term without treatment, severe organ, and even brain damage can occur. Pancreatitis can affect both dogs and cats. If you would like to learn more about how this disease affects dogs, please visit this page in the petMD health library. There are a variety of symptoms that may be observed in cats, including: There are several possible causes of inflammation to the pancreas. Some of them are: Concurrent inflammatory bowel disease or liver disease. The combination of inflammatory disease of the liver, pancreas, and intestines is so common in cats that it has its own name "triaditis." It is safe to assume that most cats diagnosed with one of these conditions have some degree of the other two as well. Certain types of infections (e.g., toxoplasmosis or feline distemper) One other s Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis facts About 210,000 cases of acute pancreatitis occur in the US every year. Pancreatitis causes abdominal pain. Pancreatitis can be an acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term) condition. The hallmark symptom of acute pancreatitis is abdominal pain. Other signs and symptoms of acute pancreatitis are: tenderness of the abdomen to touch Diagnosis of pancreatitis is generally with blood and imaging tests. Most cases of acute pancreatitis require hospitalization; however, treatment of chronic pancreatitis may be managed in an outpatient setting. Complications of pancreatitis may include: malnutrition infection pseudocyst formation Pancreatitis can range from a mild, self-limited disease to a condition with life- threatening complications. What's Causing Your Abdominal Pain? Certain persistent changes in stool color are characteristic for specific conditions such as: Pale yellow, greasy, foul-smelling stool: malabsorption of fat due to pancreatic insufficiency, as seen with pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, cystic fibrosis, celiac disease Black, foul-smelling stool: intestinal bleeding due to ulcers, tumors; Ingestion of iron or bismuth maroon stool: intestinal bleeding due to ulcers, tumors, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis Clay-colored stool: lack of bile due to blockage of the main bile duct pale yellow, greasy, foul-smelling stool: Pancreatitis is a condition characterized by inflammation of the pancreas. The pancreas is an abdominal gland situated behind the stomach in the upper abdomen. The main function of the pancreas is to secrete hormones and enzymes that help with digestion and regulate blood sugar (glucose) metabolism. The digestive enzymes are released via the pancreatic duct into the small intestine where they are activated to help break down fat Continue reading >>

17 Home Remedies For Pancreatitis Pain And Symptoms

17 Home Remedies For Pancreatitis Pain And Symptoms

17 Home Remedies For Pancreatitis Pain And Symptoms Pancreatitis symptoms occur when the pancreas is inflamed. The pancreas plays the important role in producing enzymes supporting digestion and hormones stimulating sugar procession in your body. Patients may get diagnosed with acute pancreatitis in which its symptoms attack suddenly and last for a few days. Or they may experience chronic pancreatitis in which the uncomfortable symptoms and sudden pain last over many years. In mild cases, pancreatitis can disappear without treatment. However, in severe cases, if not treated soon and properly, this condition can lead to life-threatening complications. Therefore, when you doubt that you get pancreatitis pain, it is important for you to make an appointment with your doctor immediately to get diagnosed and have proper treatments. Do not take over-the-counter medications by yourself. But what are the signs and symptoms of pancreatitis? The signs and symptoms of pancreatitis in each patient are not the same. However, common symptoms of acute pancreatitis include abdominal pain, upper abdominal pain, rapid pulse, fever, vomiting, nausea, and tenderness. Patients with chronic pancreatitis may experience significant weight loss, upper abdominal pain, and smelly oily stools. Pancreatitis may be caused by gallstones, alcoholism, abdominal surgery, certain medications, cystic fibrosis, cigarette smoking, and high triglyceride levels in your body, abdominal injuries, and infection. If one member of your family got diagnosed with pancreatitis, you may be more likely to get pancreatitis. After you meet your doctor, he may suggest some prescribed medications for treating pancreatitis. Besides those medications, there are several home remedies for pancreatitis that can relieve the symp Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis Signs & Symptoms

Pancreatitis Signs & Symptoms

Signs & Symptoms of Pancreatitis Pancreatitis often causes persistent abdominal pain. Pain in the abdomen usually occurs in the upper abdomen, can spread (radiate) to the back, and may come and go. Abdominal pain can vary from mild to severe, and often is worse after eating, drinking, consuming alcohol, and while lying on the back. Advanced cases of chronic pancreatitis may no longer cause abdominal pain because the pancreas has stopped producing digestive enzymes. Other symptoms of pancreatitis include the following: Abdominal bloating (swelling, distention) Abnormal stools (e.g., pale-colored, fatty) Belching (burping) Fever and chills (indicate infection) Hiccups Indigestion Mild jaundice (yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eyes) Nausea and vomiting Skin rashes Unexplained weight loss (due to malabsorption) Pancreatitis often causes anxiety, distress, and other signs, such as low blood pressure, rapid heart rate, and rapid breathing rate (i.e., respiration). The condition also can cause serious complications that can be life threatening. Complications include the following: Bleeding (may cause shock) Dehydration (excessive loss of body fluid) Infection Organ failure (e.g., difficulty breathing, kidney failure, heart failure) Pseudocysts (accumulations of damaged tissue and fluid that collect in the pancreas, the pancreatic duct, or the surrounding area) Tissue damage (necrosis) Chronic pancreatitis, which may develop over time or can be triggered by an acute attack, often results in the formation of scar tissue that can affect pancreatic function. Chronic pancreatitis increases the risk for diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Several factors can indicate an increased risk for serious complications and death from pancreatitis. These factors include the following: Continue reading >>

8 Symptoms Of Pancreatic Cancer You're Probably Ignoring | Reader's Digest

8 Symptoms Of Pancreatic Cancer You're Probably Ignoring | Reader's Digest

Over 53,000 people are expected to be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2017, and 43,000 will die from it. Symptoms often arent noticeable until the disease is in the advanced stages, but if you notice any of the following pancreatic cancer signs, talk to your doctor. "Jaundice is one of the clearest symptoms of pancreatic cancer," says Christopher DiMaio, MD, a gastroenterologist at The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. "Often, patients feel fine until one day a friend notices their eyes look yellow, then they go to the doctor and find they have advanced pancreatic cancer." Cancers that start near the head of the pancreas can block the bile duct, preventing bile from reaching the intestines, where it helps break down fats and eventually leaves the body in the stool. This bile builds up and causes jaundice, which is yellowing of the skin or eyes. It can also cause your skin to itch, according to the American Cancer Society . These are other cancer symptoms women should never ignore and cancer signs men should never ignore . Place the tip of your finger on the top of your abdomen, just below the breastbone. Then imagine your finger pointing straight back through your body to the spine. That's a common location that pancreatic cancer patients report feeling pain, says Dr. DiMaio. "The pain is hard to describe, but a dull, internal pain in this area, or radiating around the sides of your abdomen to the back, is a tip-off and you should get it checked out," he says. Cancers that start in the body or tail of the pancreas can press on nearby organs, causing pain. If the cancer spreads to the nerves surrounding the pancreas, this can cause back pain. Here are some more reasons your back might be hurting . If your urine starts to look dark (brown or rust colored), this Continue reading >>

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