diabetestalk.net

69 Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia In Children

Hypoglycemia In Children

What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia occurs when the blood sugar is too low to fuel the brain and the body. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body. The normal range of blood sugar, depending on the timing and nutritional content of the last meal consumed, is approximately 70 to 140 mg/dl (milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood). If you have type 1 diabetes, your goal blood sugar range may be slightly different. Infants and small children with type 1 diabetes will have different goal ranges than adolescents or adults. However, consult your child's doctor for more specific information. Hypoglycemia may be a condition by itself, or may be a complication of diabetes or another disorder. Hypoglycemia is most often seen as a complication of overdoing insulin in a person with diabetes, which is sometimes referred to as an insulin reaction. What causes hypoglycemia? Causes of hypoglycemia in children with diabetes may include the following: Too much medication; for instance, too much insulin or oral diabetes medication Medication mistakes. All families will, at some point, give the wrong kind of insulin for a meal or at bedtime. Inaccurate blood-glucose readings A missed meal A delayed meal Too little food eaten, as compared to the amount of insulin taken More exercise than usual Diarrhea or vomiting Injury, illness, infection, or emotional stress Other medical problems sometimes seen in people with type 1 diabetes, such as celiac disease or an adrenal problem. An additional cause of hypoglycemia in neonates and toddlers includes a group of conditions called hyperinsulinism. This may occur as a result of abnormal cell development of the special "beta" cells in the pancreas that secrete insulin or from a mass in the pancreas. Hypoglycemia due to endogenous insulin i Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level 45-69 Mg/dl After Eating - All About Reactive Hypoglycemia

Blood Sugar Level 45-69 Mg/dl After Eating - All About Reactive Hypoglycemia

After you've consumed your meal, you got your blood sugar level 45-69 mg/dL after eating (58, 57 56, 55, 54, 53, 52, 51, 50, 49, 48, 47, 46, 45. This is called Reactive Hypoglycemia, a condition in which hypoglycemia occurs four hours after having your meal. WHY? And get to know how to avoid having such low blood sugar after eating in the future. No Charge Glucose Meter - OneTouch Verio Flex® Meter Ad Compact Design to Track Your Glucose On-the-Go. Get It At No Charge. OneTouch Learn more Blood Sugar level 45-69 mg/dL after eating - Causes of Reactive Hypoglycemia The diagnosis of Reactive Hypoglycemia is done through: - interview regarding your actual signs and symptoms - measuring your blood sugar by drawing a blood sample from the arm and send to lab for confirmation - clinical observation of symptoms that are being subsided after consuming something to eat/drink. If symptoms will disappear and blood sugar will raise up to 70 mg/dL, then Reactive Hypoglycemia is confirmed. There is no confirmed cause to Reactive hypoglycemia, and this is still an open discussion. I do not want to enter into medical research or clinical observatory statements as this will not be of any interest for you. I want to make you clear some points of those probable causes of low blood sugar level 45-59 mg/dL after eating like: - increased sensitivity to epinephrine action (in some patients) - deficiency of production/secretion of glucagon - stomach surgeries (food passing rapidly into the small intestines). - rare enzyme deficiencies (e.g. hereditary fructose intolerance determined by food intolerance testing) Blood Sugar level 45-69 mg/dL after eating - Treating Acute Episodes Acute episodes of low blood sugar level 58, 57 ,56, 55, 54, 53, 52, 51, 50, 49, 48, 47, 46, 45 mg/dL can be treated Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar May Affect Heartbeat In People With Diabetes

Low Blood Sugar May Affect Heartbeat In People With Diabetes

Study found abnormal rhythms when blood sugar dipped at night in people with type 2 disease Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Low blood sugar levels -- known as hypoglycemia -- in people with diabetes may cause potentially dangerous changes in heart rate, according to a small new study. This study's findings may help explain why a large-scale study found that very tight control of blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes led to higher-than-expected death rates. It may also help explain why some otherwise healthy people with type 1 diabetes die during their sleep -- sometimes called "dead-in-bed syndrome" -- without an apparent cause, researchers say. "We found that hypoglycemia was fairly common and that nocturnal episodes in particular were generally marked by a pattern whereby glucose levels dropped to low levels for some hours during which patients slept," said Dr. Simon Heller, senior study author and a professor of clinical diabetes and honorary consultant physician at the University of Sheffield, in England. "These periods of hypoglycemia were associated with a high risk of marked slow heart rates [bradycardia] accompanied by [abnormal] beats. We have therefore identified a mechanism which might contribute to increased mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk during intensive insulin therapy," Heller said. Low blood sugar levels are not uncommon in people with diabetes, a disease that can Continue reading >>

Effect Of Whey On Blood Glucose And Insulin Responses To Composite Breakfast And Lunch Meals In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects1,2,3

Effect Of Whey On Blood Glucose And Insulin Responses To Composite Breakfast And Lunch Meals In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects1,2,3

Abstract Background:Whey proteins have insulinotropic effects and reduce the postprandial glycemia in healthy subjects. The mechanism is not known, but insulinogenic amino acids and the incretin hormones seem to be involved. Objective:The aim was to evaluate whether supplementation of meals with a high glycemic index (GI) with whey proteins may increase insulin secretion and improve blood glucose control in type 2 diabetic subjects. Design:Fourteen diet-treated subjects with type 2 diabetes were served a high-GI breakfast (white bread) and subsequent high-GI lunch (mashed potatoes with meatballs). The breakfast and lunch meals were supplemented with whey on one day; whey was exchanged for lean ham and lactose on another day. Venous blood samples were drawn before and during 4 h after breakfast and 3 h after lunch for the measurement of blood glucose, serum insulin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Results:The insulin responses were higher after both breakfast (31%) and lunch (57%) when whey was included in the meal than when whey was not included. After lunch, the blood glucose response was significantly reduced [−21%; 120 min area under the curve (AUC)] after whey ingestion. Postprandial GIP responses were higher after whey ingestion, whereas no differences were found in GLP-1 between the reference and test meals. Conclusions:It can be concluded that the addition of whey to meals with rapidly digested and absorbed carbohydrates stimulates insulin release and reduces postprandial blood glucose excursion after a lunch meal consisting of mashed potatoes and meatballs in type 2 diabetic subjects. INTRODUCTION In recent years, the awareness of the insulinotropic effects of milk has been growing (1). It seems that mil Continue reading >>

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

In the next two articles we’re going to discuss the concept of “normal” blood sugar. I say concept and put normal in quotation marks because what passes for normal in mainstream medicine turns out to be anything but normal if optimal health and function are what you’re interested in. Here’s the thing. We’ve confused normal with common. Just because something is common, doesn’t mean it’s normal. It’s now becoming common for kids to be overweight and diabetic because they eat nothing but refined flour, high-fructose corn syrup and industrial seed oils. Yet I don’t think anyone (even the ADA) would argue that being fat and metabolically deranged is even remotely close to normal for kids. Or adults, for that matter. In the same way, the guidelines the so-called authorities like the ADA have set for normal blood sugar may be common, but they’re certainly not normal. Unless you think it’s normal for people to develop diabetic complications like neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular disease as they age, and spend the last several years of their lives in hospitals or assisted living facilities. Common, but not normal. In this article I’m going to introduce the three markers we use to measure blood sugar, and tell you what the conventional model thinks is normal for those markers. In the next article, I’m going to show you what the research says is normal for healthy people. And I’m also going to show you that so-called normal blood sugar, as dictated by the ADA, can double your risk of heart disease and lead to all kinds of complications down the road. The 3 ways blood sugar is measured Fasting blood glucose This is still the most common marker used in clinical settings, and is often the only one that gets tested. The fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

How Low Is Too Low? Blood Sugar And Hypoglycemia

How Low Is Too Low? Blood Sugar And Hypoglycemia

Keeping blood sugar (glucose) levels from rising too high is the main goal of diabetes care. But glucose levels that drop too low, a condition called hypoglycemia , can be a problem, too. Luckily, the condition is fairly easy to treat if caught early. It's important for people with diabetes to be able to recognize hypoglycemia as soon as the symptoms begin and monitor them. If you find a pattern, where you are having low blood sugars frequently, you should let your health care providers know so that they address and fix the issue. Overview Those most at risk include people with type 1 diabetes (particularly children) and those with type 2 diabetes who are treated with insulin in combination with non insulin injectables or oral medications that stimulate insulin secretion. In addition, elderly people who may not be able to detect low blood sugar are also at risk for low blood sugar. When very tight glucose control is the goal of treatment, as it often is, hypoglycemia is particularly likely. This is especially true early in the course of therapy. It's important to note that hypoglycemia essentially doesn't occur in patients with type 2 diabetes using only dietary control. Causes Hypoglycemia occurs when there is not enough glucose in the blood to provide the body with energy. Several things can lead to this state: Meal skipping Exercise Taking the wrong doses of medications or insulin, or timing them incorrectly Drinking alcohol Kidney disease Weight Loss (can make you more sensitive to your medicine) Healthy Ranges According to the American Diabetes Association, hypoglycemia occurs when blood glucose levels are less than or equal to 70 mg/dL and symptoms are present. If someone with diabetes has a glucose reading lower than 54 mg/dL, this is considered clinically signif Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia: What Do You Feel In Your Body? What Do You Feel In Your Mind?

Hypoglycemia: What Do You Feel In Your Body? What Do You Feel In Your Mind?

A word of caution about the values used below. This study was conducted using people without diabetes. Some people with diabetes experience symptoms at higher glucose levels than the study suggests. Other people with diabetes appear to function well with blood sugars in the 30’s and 40’s (mg/dl). Therefore, the values in the study should only be used as an approximation. This study also used plasma glucose levels. Your values done at home might be 20 percent lower or higher than these lab values. For example, epinephrine release in someone without diabetes would begin at about 63mg/dl with a home blood glucose meter. More caution: Many people with long-standing type 1 diabetes completely lose some of these responses. The glucose counter-regulation system becomes impaired sometime during the first few years of diabetes. This impairment is unusual in that it seems to be hypoglycemia-specific: the ability of glucagon and epinephrine to respond to other stimuli is basically unchanged, but is reduced or absent when dealing with hypoglycemia. The cause of this is not known, but it is closely linked with the lack of insulin production. SIDE BAR: HYPOGLYCEMIA, What Happens As Your Blood Glucose Levels Fall*: at 69 mg/dl Epinephrine is released into the bloodstream at 68 mg/dl Glucagon release begins at 67 mg/dl The brain conserves glucose by reducing glucose uptake at 66 mg/dl The body releases the growth hormone Somatotropin, which tells the body to reduce its use of glucose and burn fat instead at 58 mg/dl Cortisol, a steroid that promotes the conversion of glycogen into glucose at 54 mg/dl Full-on hypoglycemic body symptoms may start including shaking, pounding heart, nervousness, sweating, tingling and hunger at 49 mg/dl Thinking becomes impaired. The Mind symptoms star Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

LOW BLOOD SUGAR OVERVIEW Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, occurs when levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too low. Hypoglycemia is common in people with diabetes who take insulin and some (but not all) oral diabetes medications. WHY DO I GET LOW BLOOD SUGAR? Low blood sugar happens when a person with diabetes does one or more of the following: Takes too much insulin (or an oral diabetes medication that causes your body to secrete insulin) Does not eat enough food Exercises vigorously without eating a snack or decreasing the dose of insulin beforehand Waits too long between meals Drinks excessive alcohol, although even moderate alcohol use can increase the risk of hypoglycemia in people with type 1 diabetes LOW BLOOD SUGAR SYMPTOMS The symptoms of low blood sugar vary from person to person, and can change over time. During the early stages low blood sugar, you may: Sweat Tremble Feel hungry Feel anxious If untreated, your symptoms can become more severe, and can include: Difficulty walking Weakness Difficulty seeing clearly Bizarre behavior or personality changes Confusion Unconsciousness or seizure When possible, you should confirm that you have low blood sugar by measuring your blood sugar level (see "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)"). Low blood sugar is generally defined as a blood sugar of 60 mg/dL (3.3 mmol/L) or less. Some people with diabetes develop symptoms of low blood sugar at slightly higher levels. If your blood sugar levels are high for long periods of time, you may have symptoms and feel poorly when your blood sugar is closer to 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Getting your blood sugar under better control can help to lower the blood sugar level when you begin to feel symptoms. Hypoglyc Continue reading >>

Why Is My Blood Glucose Sometimes Low After Physical Activity?

Why Is My Blood Glucose Sometimes Low After Physical Activity?

Low blood glucose is defined as a blood glucose level below 70 mg/dl if your meter measures whole blood, or 80 mg/dl or below if it measures plasma glucose (a plasma blood glucose of 90 mg/dl or below with symptoms is also a sign of hypoglycemia). One of the most common causes of low blood glucose is too much physical activity. In fact, moderate to intense exercise may cause your blood glucose to drop for the next 24 hours following exercise. This post-exercise hypoglycemia is often referred to as the "lag effect" of exercise. Basically, when you exercise, the body uses two sources of fuel, sugar and free fatty acids (that is, fat) to generate energy. The sugar comes from the blood, the liver and the muscles. The sugar is stored in the liver and muscle in a form called glycogen. During the first 15 minutes of exercise, most of the sugar for fuel comes from either the blood stream or the muscle glycogen, which is converted back to sugar. After 15 minutes of exercise, however, the fuel starts to come more from the glycogen stored in the liver. After 30 minutes of exercise, the body begins to get more of its energy from the free fatty acids. As a result, exercise can deplete sugar levels and glycogen stores. The body will replace these glycogen stores but this process may take 4 to 6 hours, even 12 to 24 hours with more intense activity. During this rebuilding of glycogen stores, a person with diabetes can be at higher risk for hypoglycemia. Here are tips for safe exercising. Guidelines for preventing exercise related hypoglycemia Check your blood glucose before exercising to make sure your blood glucose is sufficient and/or consume an appropriate snack. Avoid exercise at the peak of your insulin action. Avoid late evening exercise. Exercise should be completed 2 hours bef Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. Insulin is needed to move glucose into cells where it is stored or used for energy. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into the cells. This leads to symptoms of diabetes. Low blood sugar occurs due to any of the following: Your body's sugar (glucose) is used up too quickly Glucose production by the body is too low or it is released into the bloodstream too slowly Too much insulin is in the bloodstream Low blood sugar is common in people with diabetes who are taking insulin or certain other medicines to control their diabetes. However, many other diabetes medicines do not cause low blood sugar. Exercise can also lead to low blood sugar in people taking insulin to treat their diabetes. Babies born to mothers with diabetes may have severe drops in blood sugar right after birth. In people who do not have diabetes, low blood sugar may be caused by: Drinking alcohol Insulinoma, which is a rare tumor in the pancreas that produces too much insulin Lack of a hormone, such as cortisol, growth hormone, or thyroid hormone Severe heart, kidney, or liver failure Infection that affects the whole body (sepsis) Some types of weight-loss surgery (usually 5 or more years after the surgery) Medicines not used to treat diabetes (certain antibiotics or heart drugs) Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

When people eat a food containing carbohydrates, the digestive system breaks down the digestible ones into sugar, which enters the blood. As blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that prompts cells to absorb blood sugar for energy or storage. As cells absorb blood sugar, levels in the bloodstream begin to fall. When this happens, the pancreas start making glucagon, a hormone that signals the liver to start releasing stored sugar. This interplay of insulin and glucagon ensure that cells throughout the body, and especially in the brain, have a steady supply of blood sugar. Carbohydrate metabolism is important in the development of type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it makes. Type 2 diabetes usually develops gradually over a number of years, beginning when muscle and other cells stop responding to insulin. This condition, known as insulin resistance, causes blood sugar and insulin levels to stay high long after eating. Over time, the heavy demands made on the insulin-making cells wears them out, and insulin production eventually stops. Glycemic index In the past, carbohydrates were commonly classified as being either “simple” or “complex,” and described as follows: Simple carbohydrates: These carbohydrates are composed of sugars (such as fructose and glucose) which have simple chemical structures composed of only one sugar (monosaccharides) or two sugars (disaccharides). Simple carbohydrates are easily and quickly utilized for energy by the body because of their simple chemical structure, often leading to a faster rise in blood sugar and insulin secretion from the pancreas – which can have negative health effects. Complex carbohydrates: These carbohydrates have mo Continue reading >>

My Life With Diabetes: 69 Years And Counting

My Life With Diabetes: 69 Years And Counting

I do not know of many diabetics who developed the illness around the time I did, in 1946, who are still alive. I know of none who do not suffer from active complications. The reality is, had I not taken charge of my diabetes, it’s very unlikely that I’d be alive and active today. Many myths surround diet and diabetes, and much of what is still considered by the average physician to be sensible nutritional advice for diabetics can, over the long run, be fatal. I know, because conventional “wisdom” about diabetes almost killed me. I developed diabetes in 1946 at the age of twelve, and for more than two decades I was an “ordinary” diabetic, dutifully following doctor’s orders and leading the most normal life I could, given the limitations of my disease. Over the years, the complications from my diabetes became worse and worse, and like many diabetics in similar circumstances, I faced a very early death. I was still alive, but the quality of my life wasn’t particularly good. I have what is known as type 1, or insulin-dependent, diabetes, which usually begins in childhood (it’s also called juvenileonset diabetes). Type 1 diabetics must take daily insulin injections just to stay alive. Back in the 1940s, which were very much still the “dark ages” of diabetes treatment, I had to sterilize my needles and glass syringes by boiling them every day, and sharpen my needles with an abrasive stone. I used a test tube and an alcohol lamp (flame) to test my urine for sugar. Many of the tools the diabetic can take for granted today were scarcely dreamed of back then — there was no such thing as a rapid, finger-stick blood sugar–measuring device, nor disposable insulin syringes. Still, even today, parents of type 1 diabetics have to live with the same fear my par Continue reading >>

What To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low

What To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low

You'll need to test your blood sugar if you think you have hypoglycemia.(ARTIGA PHOTO/CORBIS)Although type 2 diabetes is characterized by blood sugar that is too high, some people take insulin and others medications (such as sulfonylureas) that can occasionally drive blood sugar too low. When blood sugar is too lowgenerally less than 70 mg/dLit's called hypoglycemia, and it can become a medical emergency. (The normal range for fasting blood sugar is 70 to 99 mg/dL, though it varies somewhat with age, and is lower during pregnancy and in children.) You can lose consciousness Hypoglycemia is more likely to occur when you start taking a new medication (it can take practice to match your food intake to your insulin dose, for example) or if you exercise more than usual. As blood sugar drops to low levels, you may feel: Shaky Irritable Sweaty This can occur within 10 to 15 minutes, and in extreme cases you can even lose consciousness and experience seizures if you don't consume some glucose (though hypoglycemia is usually mild in people with type 2 diabetes, and readily fixed by drinking juice or eating other sugar-containing items, such as glucose tablets or four to six pieces of hard candy). Hypoglycemia"My blood sugar was really plummeting" Watch videoMore about blood sugar monitoring You'll need to test your blood sugar to confirm that you're having hypoglycemiasome people become irritable if blood sugar is too high, so it's not always obvious. If you drink sugar-containing juice, or some other form of carbohydrate, it should bring blood sugar back into the normal range. You can also purchase glucose pills or gels in the pharmacy that can get blood sugar back on track. “You should always have a glucose source in the car,” says Yvonne Thigpen, RD, diabetes program coor Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels And Diabetes

Blood Sugar Levels And Diabetes

Blood glucose levels, often called blood sugar levels, are an important part of checking that diabetes is well managed. Over time, high sugar levels associated with diabetes damage the body and can lead to other health problems. If blood glucose levels are too high, this is called hyperglycaemia. If they are too low, it is called hypoglycaemia. Both extremes are best avoided and a person with diabetes will use treatments such as tablets, diet, exercise or insulin to try to keep the readings within target levels. Guideline targets vary depending on age and the type of diabetes, but a doctor may suggest specific targets for individual patients. Blood glucose readings can be done at home with a special meter and test strips. Some allow results to be downloaded to a computer to help show trends in glucose control. Before meals: 4–8mmol/l Two hours after meals: less than 10mmol/l Adults with type 1 diabetes Before meals: 4–7mmol/l Two hours after meals: less than 9mmol/l Before meals: 4–7mmol/l Two hours after meals: less than 8.5mmol/l Sugar and your body Why are high blood sugar levels bad for you? It turns out your body doesn't have much of a sweet tooth. Glucose is precious fuel for all the cells in your body - when it's present at normal levels - but persistently high sugar levels behave like a slow-acting poison. High sugar levels slowly erode the ability of cells in the pancreas to make insulin. The pancreas overcompensates, though, and insulin levels remain overly high. Gradually, the pancreas is permanently damaged. All the excess sugar is modified in the blood. It becomes a form that sticks to and coats bloodstream proteins, which are normally "sugar-free." Thanks to this sugary film, the proteins don't function well, can be deposited in blood vessels, and ca Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

South Eastern Florida Regional Diabetes Program Diabetes Education Service 1450 Northwest 10th Avenue, Miami FL, 33136 Phone: 305â€243â€3696  Fax:305â€243â€5791 © 2009 H ypoglycemia or a ‘hypo’ means having a blood sugar level below 70mg/dL and usually only occurs in people who take certain tablets or injectable medication to treat  their diabetes. Hypoglycemia is usually avoidable, however, it is important that if you do experience a low blood sugar level, you know how to recognize and importantly treat the situation. Prevention of low blood sugar levels is the primary goal.   What are the Symptoms of Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia The “Rule of 15†Blood sugar less than 70mg/dl 15 grams quick acting carbs (Glucose tablets, juice, regular soda, or candy) Recheck blood sugar in 15 minutes Repeat 15 grams of quick acting carbs until blood sugar is above 70 mg/dl There are two stages of symptoms or signs associated with low blood sugars:  These first stage symptoms are our safety symptoms that warn us of low blood sugar levels. It is important to listen and respond to these symptoms. They usually occur with blood sugar levels between 55 – 70mg/dl. If you have had elevated blood sugar levels above 200mg/dl for a period of time, you may feel low at normal blood sugar levels of 80 – 100mg/dL.   These second sta Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar