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542 Blood Sugar

Blood Sugar 542 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 542 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

General information about Very High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia / Dangerous) Hyperglycemia, which is more commonly known as high blood sugar, occurs when the body is incapable of shuttling glucose out of the bloodstream so it can be transferred to cells for use as energy. In most cases, this condition is only a problem for diabetic individuals because these people suffer from dysfunction of insulin, the hormone used by the body for regulating blood sugar levels. Symptoms of hyperglycemia usually take several weeks to develop and can involve: Dry mouth and an unusual degree of thirst, which prompts the person to drink more water than normal. This condition is called polydipsia. Polyuria, which refers to an increased frequency of urination, particularly during nighttime. Polyphagia, which is an increase in both appetite and food consumption. More serious symptoms, which are generally caused by prolonged periods of high blood sugar causing damage to body tissues, often take longer to occur and can include: Losing weight despite increased food intake Nerve damage, nerve pain and numbness or tingling in the extremities (peripheral neuropathy) Individuals with diabetes are not able to convert blood sugar into energy either because on insufficient levels of insulin or because their insulin is simply not functioning correctly. This means that glucose stays in the bloodstream, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Diabetes takes two distinct forms: Type 1 and type 2. Diagnosing hyperglycemia is done by assessing symptoms and performing a simple blood glucose test. Depending on the severity of the condition and which type of diabetes the patient is diagnosed with, insulin and a variety of medication may be prescribed to help the person keep their blood sugar under control. Insuli Continue reading >>

Methadone-induced Hypoglycemia.

Methadone-induced Hypoglycemia.

Department of Neurology and The Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10065, USA. To determine if recent observations of hypoglycemia in patients receiving high-dose methadone extended to an animal model, we explored the effects of methadone and other mu-opioids on blood glucose levels in mice. Methadone lowered blood glucose in a dose-dependent manner with 20mg/kg yielding a nadir in average glucose levels to 556mg/dL from a baseline of 1727mg/dL, an effect that was antagonized by naloxone and mu selective antagonists -funaltrexamine and naloxonazine. The effect was stereoselective and limited to only the l-isomer, while the d-isomer was ineffective. Despite the robust decrease in blood glucose produced by methadone, a series of other mu-opioids, including morphine, fentanyl, levorphanol, oxycodone or morphine-6-glucuronide failed to lower blood glucose levels. Similar differences among mu-opioid agonists have been observed in other systems, suggesting the possible role of selected splice variants of the mu-opioid receptor gene Oprm1. This mouse model recapitulates our clinical observations and emphasizes the need to carefully monitor glucose levels when using high methadone doses, particularly intravenously, and the need for controlled clinical trials. Continue reading >>

Experimental Diabetes In The Catfish: Normal And Alloxan-diabetic Blood Glucose And Pancreatic Histology

Experimental Diabetes In The Catfish: Normal And Alloxan-diabetic Blood Glucose And Pancreatic Histology

Alloxan diabetes has been demonstrated in the common lake catfish by correlated histological and blood sugar studies. Anatomical considerations make this animal particularly suitable for this work. The conus arteriosus is conveniently situated for intravascular injection and serial blood sampling. The concentration of endocrine pancreas in a principal islet and accessory islets, all with limited exocrine tissue, facilitates histological preparations. In 237 determinations, using a Folin-Malmros micro method modified for fish blood, the normal blood sugar value was found to be 59 mg.%, with a standard deviation of 19 mg.%. Alloxan was administered through the conus of 50 fish, at 400 mg./kg. In alloxanized fish, blood sugar levels of 120200 mg.% were typical. This hyperglycemia persisted through the 96 hour period studied and, in a few fish not sacrificed earlier for histological study, for 14 days, the longest period studied. In the intact animal, the principal islet is composed of manjr, heavily-granulated beta cells, with a similar number of other islet cells and a cortex of exocrine tissue. Within 3 hours of alloxan injection, degranulation of beta cells was apparent. In subsequent sampling periods, up to 96 hours, degranulation increased, accompanied by progressive hydropic degeneration and nuclear disintegration. These changes were found onty in beta cells. Copyright 1959 by The Endocrine Society Continue reading >>

What Happens If My Blood Sugar Gets Really High?

What Happens If My Blood Sugar Gets Really High?

Your blood sugar is high when the numbers are 130 mg/dL or higher. High blood sugar can: Make you thirsty Cause headaches Make you go to the bathroom often to urinate (pee) Make it hard to pay attention Blur your vision Make you feel weak or tired Cause yeast infections The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the US Government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS. High blood sugars cause the body to slow down. When sugar levels are high, blood thickening occurs which causes a reduction of oxygen in the brain and this lessens responses to stimuli. In turn, chemical synapses don’t function properly, reducing the brains ability to process information. This makes it harder to think and process data clearly. It impacts memory recall, attention, concentration, focus, and retention of external information, making learning difficult and in some cases impossible for the child or adult diabetic. Now imagine trying to swim in Jell-O®. For those synapses, the high blood sugar is the same as if you were the Olympic Gold Medalist swimmer Michael Phelps (synapse) and your lane had filled with Jell-O®, causing you not to be able to reach your full potential. If your sugars are normal and your pool (brain) is filled with the proper chemicals and water, you will get to finish (information stored in your brain) faster and sometimes you will win the race (get almost perfect scores on the SAT’s.) This feeling of Jell-O® also causes poor memory recall and prevents new information from assimilating into the memory properly, causing memory loss and poor retention. It hinders the growth of new cells in the brain Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels Surge To Record Highs

Blood Sugar Levels Surge To Record Highs

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say that more than 1 in 3 American adults have blood sugar levels that are too high.1 The condition they are referring to is prediabetes. It occurs when blood sugar markers are elevated, but have not yet reached the diabetic threshold. In 2016, UCLA reported that 46% of California adults are either prediabetic or have undiagnosed type II diabetes.2 The severity of this health crisis cannot be overstated. Diabetic pathologies develop during the prediabetic phase.3 So by the time type II diabetes manifests, patients already confront complications that include kidney impairment,4,5 vision loss,6-8 neuropathy,9 atherosclerosis,10-12 and cancer.13-15 Despite these risks, populations around the world increasingly gorge on deadly foods/drinks that spike blood sugar levels. Not only does this increase disease risk, it accelerates aging by shortening telomeres.16,17 We at Life Extension have warned of this catastrophic epidemic since the early 1980s. Back in those days, what authorities now recognize as dangerously high glucose levels were considered safe by the medical mainstream. An abundance of published findings support our recommendation to keep blood sugar at the low end of the normal reference range.18-21 Despite these conclusive data, the medical community has failed to wake up to the life-shortening impact of prediabetes. It is thus up to individuals to take charge and make the appropriate adjustments. There are a variety of methods to maintain healthier glucose levels. It all begins with proper blood testing. Standard blood tests often miss identifying early-stage prediabetes and diabetes. Thats because the last marker to elevate in patients with poor glycemic control is often fasting glucose. The reason for this is that Continue reading >>

Metformin Acutely Lowers Blood Glucose Levels By Inhibition Of Intestinal Glucose Transport

Metformin Acutely Lowers Blood Glucose Levels By Inhibition Of Intestinal Glucose Transport

Metformin acutely lowers blood glucose levels by inhibition of intestinal glucose transport Scientific Reportsvolume9, Articlenumber:6156 (2019) | Download Citation Metformin is currently the most prescribed drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans. It has been well established that long-term treatment with metformin improves glucose tolerance in mice by inhibiting hepatic gluconeogenesis. Interestingly, a single dose of orally administered metformin acutely lowers blood glucose levels, however, little is known about the mechanism involved in this effect. Glucose tolerance, as assessed by the glucose tolerance test, was improved in response to prior oral metformin administration when compared to vehicle-treated mice, irrespective of whether the animals were fed either the standard or high-fat diet. Blood glucose-lowering effects of acutely administered metformin were also observed in mice lacking functional AMP-activated protein kinase, and were independent of glucagon-like-peptide-1 or N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors signaling. [18F]-FDG/PET revealed a slower intestinal transit of labeled glucose after metformin as compared to vehicle administration. Finally, metformin in a dose-dependent but indirect manner decreased glucose transport from the intestinal lumen into the blood, which was observed ex vivo as well as in vivo. Our results support the view that the inhibition of transepithelial glucose transport in the intestine is responsible for lowering blood glucose levels during an early response to oral administration of metformin. Metformin, the most potent of the biguanide analogs, was synthetized at the beginning of 20th century and introduced to human medicine in 1958 1 . Due to its excellent abilities to manage blood glucose levels accompanied by Continue reading >>

Blog Helps Man Stay Committed To Life Overhaul

Blog Helps Man Stay Committed To Life Overhaul

Nadia Al-Samarrie 0 Comments Blog Diabetes diabetes blog Diabetes Health Diabetes Health Magazine living with diabetes In his first post on a blog he started last February, Billy Brennan revealed that he was shocked to discover, after testing his blood sugar for the first time in months, that his glucose level was a startling 542 I was surprised I wasnt in a coma, he wrote. It is time for making drastic changes. From this day forward no sugar, low-carb diet, and figure out how to get back in shape. These days posts on Brennans blog, simplelivingover50.com, list blood sugar levels in the 80s and 90s. Hes dropped 27 pounds at least in part because he knows readers monitor his progress. When Brennan was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes four years ago, he resolved to get serious about his health. But the stress from working as a supervisor at a New Jersey state prison made it hard to adopt regular eating and sleeping patterns. Ultimately he retired from that position and he and his wife relocated to Oregon in search of a simpler life with fewer possessions. I was an athlete when I was younger and always tried to keep myself in good physical condition, says Brennan, now 54. But I always did it for a while until my schedule changed and (then I) found it hard to get the workouts into my daily routine. Today I work out nearly every day and am currently working to hone the workout routine and the diet to balance with my blood sugar readings. The move, philosophy change and living near some of their far-flung grandchildren have helped Brennan better manage his diabetes. So has a dietary shift toward foods he describes as more close to the earth such as lean meats and fresh vegetables. But theres nothing quite like a daily blog to help keep him accountable. I first started out with Continue reading >>

Systematic Review And Metaanalysis Of Antihyperglycaemic Effects Of Puerh Tea

Systematic Review And Metaanalysis Of Antihyperglycaemic Effects Of Puerh Tea

International Journal of Food Science & Technology Department of Healthcare Administration, Asia University, Taiwan No.500, Lioufeng Rd., Wufeng, Taichung, 41354 Taiwan Taichung Armed Forces General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan No.348, Sec. 2, Zhongshan Rd., Taiping Dist., Taichung City, 411 Taiwan National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan No.161, Sec. 6, Minquan E. Rd., Neihu Dist., Taipei City, 11490 Taiwan Department of Healthcare Administration, Asia University, Taiwan No.500, Lioufeng Rd., Wufeng, Taichung, 41354 Taiwan Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan No.91, HsuehShih Road, Taichung, 40402 Taiwan Department of Healthcare Administration, Asia University, Taiwan No.500, Lioufeng Rd., Wufeng, Taichung, 41354 Taiwan Taichung Armed Forces General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan No.348, Sec. 2, Zhongshan Rd., Taiping Dist., Taichung City, 411 Taiwan National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan No.161, Sec. 6, Minquan E. Rd., Neihu Dist., Taipei City, 11490 Taiwan Department of Healthcare Administration, Asia University, Taiwan No.500, Lioufeng Rd., Wufeng, Taichung, 41354 Taiwan Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan No.91, HsuehShih Road, Taichung, 40402 Taiwan Please review our Terms and Conditions of Use and check box below to share full-text version of article. I have read and accept the Wiley Online Library Terms and Conditions of Use. Use the link below to share a full-text version of this article with your friends and colleagues. Learn more. Puerh tea was presumed to have antihyperglycaemic effects with limited evidence. This study uses metaanalysis to investigate antihyperglycaemic effect of Puerh tea. Five En Continue reading >>

In Cats With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus, Use Of A Near-euglycemic Management Paradigm Improves Remission Rate Over A Traditional Paradigm

In Cats With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus, Use Of A Near-euglycemic Management Paradigm Improves Remission Rate Over A Traditional Paradigm

In cats with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus, use of a near-euglycemic management paradigm improves remission rate over a traditional paradigm In cats with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus, use of a near-euglycemic management paradigm improves remission rate over a traditional paradigm The object of this retrospective study was to compare the effect on remission rates of a near euglycemic paradigm (NEP) to a traditional paradigm (TP) of glycemic control in cats with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus. Medical records of 54 cats with nave diabetes mellitus managed with low carbohydrate, high protein prescription diets, and twice daily subcutaneous glargine insulin injections were reviewed. Cats were assigned to an NEP or TP group based on frequency of evaluation of blood glucose concentration and the criteria used to assess glycemic control. The two groups were compared with regard to the incidence of clinical and biochemical hypoglycemia and remission rates. Multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between remission and independent variables. Fourteen of 18 cats (78%) in the NEP group achieved remission, whereas five of the 36 (14%) of the TP group achieved remission (p < 0.001). For the NEP group, biochemical hypoglycemia was noted in 8/18 (44%) and clinical hypoglycemia was documented in 2/18 (11%) of the cats. In the TP group, biochemical hypoglycemia was noted in 12/36 (33%) cats and 5/36 (14%) had clinical hypoglycemia. In conclusion, management of newly diagnosed diabetic cats using an NEP of glycemic control results in higher remission rates without an increased incidence of observed clinical or biochemical hypoglycemia. Although an NEP appears to have benefit it should be evaluated further with regard to its overall and long term effe Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia In Type 1 Diabetes

Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia In Type 1 Diabetes

Hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes Created: May 29, 2007; Last Update: June 29, 2017; Next update: 2020. Hyperglycemia occurs when blood sugar levels are too high. People develop hyperglycemia if their diabetes is not treated properly. Hypoglycemia sets in when blood sugar levels are too low. This is usually a side effect of treatment with blood-sugar-lowering medication. Diabetes is a metabolic disease with far-reaching health effects. In type 1 diabetes, the body only produces very little insulin, or none at all. In type 2 diabetes, not enough insulin is released into the bloodstream, or the insulin cannot be used properly. We need insulin to live. Without it, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood because it cannot be taken out and used by the body. Very high blood sugar, known as hyperglycemia, leads to a number of symptoms. If blood sugar levels are too low, it is called hypoglycemia. When is blood sugar considered to be too high or too low? Slight fluctuations in blood sugar levels are completely normal and also happen on a daily basisin people who do not have diabetes. Between around 60 and 140 milligrams of sugar per deciliter of blood (mg/dL) is considered to be healthy. This is equivalent to blood sugar concentrations between 3.3 and 7.8 mmol/L. Millimole per liter (mmol/L) is the international unit for measuring blood sugar. It indicates the concentration of a certain substance per liter. If type 1 diabetes is left untreated, peoples blood sugar levels can get very high, sometimes exceeding 27.8 mmol/L (500 mg/dL). Blood sugar concentrations below 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL) are considered to be too low. As you can see in the illustration below, there are no clear-cut borders between the normal range of blood sugar and high and low blood sugar. Bloo Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Adrenal Histology Of The Goldfish After Treatment With Mammalian Adrenocorticotrophic Hormone

Blood Sugar And Adrenal Histology Of The Goldfish After Treatment With Mammalian Adrenocorticotrophic Hormone

, Volume 7, Issue4 , pp 198202 | Cite as Blood sugar and adrenal histology of the goldfish after treatment with mammalian adrenocorticotrophic hormone Intraperitoneal injection of mammalian adrenocorticotrophic hormone at 2 IU and 4 IU per day for seven days was followed by hyperglycemia and adrenal growth in goldfish. Normal blood sugar values, at 1620C, were about 30 mg% by both Folin and Glucostat methods. Mcan values after treatment approached 70 mg%. Hypertrophy and hyperplasia of interrenal tissue were seen in most treated fish. Nuclear pycnosis and cell shrinkage were infrequent. Control and experimental populations showed no differences in frequency of nucleolar extrusion. Blood SugarChum SalmonBlood Sugar LevelControl FishPacific Salmon These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves. This work was supported by the J. P. Bickell Foundation, grant T-93 of the National Research Council, and grant A-1129 of the National Institute for Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Public Health Service. Post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University, 196263, and research fellow, summer 1963, Cape Haze Marine Labortory, Sarasota, Florida. This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access. Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF. Baecher, R. 1928. ber die Nebennieren der Teleostier.Z. mikros. Anat. Forsch. 15:204273. Google Scholar Chavin, W. 1956. Pituitary-adrenal control of melanization in xanthic goldfish,Carassius auratus L.J. Exptl. Zool. 133(1):146. CrossRef Google Scholar 1961. Adrenocortical histochemistry of intact and hypophysectomized goldfish.Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. 1:264274. CrossRef Google Scholar Ches Continue reading >>

Wolf Administration Encourages Awareness, Education Of Diabetes

Wolf Administration Encourages Awareness, Education Of Diabetes

Wolf Administration Encourages Awareness, Education of Diabetes Harrisburg, PA The Wolf Administration is encouraging all Pennsylvanians to be aware of the signs and symptoms of diabetes and the ways to reduce the risk of developing the disease by practicing a healthy lifestyle and regularly seeing a primary care provider. Diabetes is a chronic disease in which blood sugar levels are above normal, Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said. Diabetes must be managed effectively; if not, this disease can lead to a number of serious health conditions, including adult blindness, kidney failure, and lower limb amputations. Diagnosed diabetes costs an estimated $12.9 billion in Pennsylvania each year. Nearly 11 percent of adults in Pennsylvania have diabetes, and a significant number of those are not aware of it, which greatly increases their health risk. One in three adults has prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but are not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. This means that almost half of all Pennsylvanians either have diabetes or are at significant risk of developing diabetes. Individuals with diabetes are encouraged to talk to their primary care physician about participating in a diabetes self-management education and support program to learn how to better manage their disease. People can develop diabetes because the pancreas produces little or no insulin, or because insulin is not used properly. There are two main types of diabetes, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is a disease of the immune system, and typically starts out during the childhood and young adult years. People with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin daily. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the disease in adults. Type 2 diabetes ty Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

Hyperglycemia in Dogs A dog with abnormally high levels of glucose in the blood is said to have hyperglycemia. A simple carbohydrate sugar that circulates in the blood, glucose is a major source of energy for the body, of which normal levels range between 75-120mg. Insulin, a hormone that is produced and released by the pancreas into the bloodstream when glucose levels rise, plays a key role in maintaining normal sugar levels. Low levels or absolute deficiency of insulin results in abnormally high blood sugar levels. Some of the causes for hyperglycemia may be pancreatitis, and the resulting inability to produce insulin; normally occurring hormones, especially in female dogs; diet; and infections of the body (such as teeth, or urinary tract). Middle aged and older dogs are more at risk for developing hyperglycemia, and it is more common in female dogs than in males. Any breed can be affected, but some smaller breeds appear to be more disposed, including beagles, cairn terriers, dachshunds, miniature poodles and schnauzers. Symptoms and Types Clinical symptoms may vary depending on the underlying disease/condition. Your dog may not be showing any serious symptoms, especially those if the increased sugar is thought to be temporary, hormonal, or stress induced hyperglycemia. Some of the more common symptoms include: Depression Weight loss Excessive hunger Dehydration Bloodshot eyes (due to inflamed blood vessels) Liver enlargement Nerve damage in legs Severe depression (in cases of very high blood sugar levels) Non-healing wounds;infection is increased as the excess sugar feeds fungal and bacterial invaders Tissue damage (due to oxidizing [burning] effect of the excess sugar in the tissue) Causes Other than high stress situations, harmful drug interactions (such as with he Continue reading >>

Glucose Self-monitoring: Think Twice For Type 2 Patients

Glucose Self-monitoring: Think Twice For Type 2 Patients

Glucose self-monitoring: Think twice for type 2 patients J Fam Pract. 2008 November;57(11):731-734 Department of Family Medicine, The University of Chicago Department of Family Medicine, The University of Chicago For patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, self-monitoring may do more harm than good 1. OKane MJ, Bunting B, Copeland M, Coates VE. ESMON study group Efficacy of self monitoring of blood glucose in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (ESMON study): randomised controlled trial. BMJ. 2008;336:1174-1177. 2. McIntosh A, Hutchinson A, Home PD, et al. Clinical guidelines and evidence review for Type 2 diabetes: management of blood glucose. 2002. Scharr, University of Sheffield. Available at: . Accessed July 29, 2008. 3. Canadian Diabetes Association Clinical Practice Guidelines Expert Committee Canadian Diabetes Association 2003 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada. Can J Diabetes. 2003;27(suppl 2):S18-S23. 4. Karter AJ, Ackerson LM, Darbinian JA, et al. Self-monitoring of blood glucose levels and glycemic control: the Northern California Kaiser Permanente Diabetes Registry. Am J Med. 2001;111:1-9. 5. Sarol JN Jr, Nicodemus NA Jr, Tan KM, Grava MB. Self-monitoring of blood glucose as part of a multi-component therapy among non-insulin requiring type 2 diabetes patients: a meta-analysis (1966-2004). Curr Med Res Opin. 2005;21:173-184. 6. Welschen LM, Bloemendal E, Nijpels G, et al. Self-monitoring of blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes who are not using insulin: a systematic review. Diabetes Care. 2005;28:1510-1517. 7. Welschen LM, Bloemendal E, Nijpels G, et al. Self-monitoring of blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who are not using insulin. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Emergencies

High Blood Sugar Emergencies

Blood sugar levels that are too high (hyperglycemia) can quickly turn into a diabetic emergency without quick and appropriate treatment. The best way to avoid dangerously high blood sugar levels is to self-test to stay in tune with your body, and to stay attuned to the symptoms and risk factors for hyperglycemia. Extremely high blood sugar levels can lead to one of two conditionsdiabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS; also called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic coma). Although both syndromes can occur in either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, DKA is more common in type 1, and HHNS is more common in type 2. Ketoacidosis (or DKA) occurs when blood sugars become elevated (over 249 mg/dl, or 13.9 mmol/l) over a period of time and the body begins to burn fat for energy, resulting in ketone bodies in the blood or urine (a phenomenon called ketosis). A variety of factors can cause hyperglycemia ( high blood glucose ), including failure to take medication or insulin, stress, dietary changes without medication adjustments, eating disorders, and illness or injury. This last cause is important, because if illness brings on DKA, it may slip by unnoticed, since its symptoms can mimic the flu (aches, vomiting, etc.). In fact, people with type 1 diabetes are often seeking help for the flu-like symptoms of DKA when they first receive their diagnosis. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis may include: DKA is a medical emergency, and requires prompt and immediate treatment. A simple over-the-counter urine dipstick test (e.g., Ketostix) can check for ketones; anyone who has blood glucose levels above 240 mg/dl (13.3 mmol/l) should test their urine for ketones. There is also at least one glucose meter on the market that tests blood ketone levels. Continue reading >>

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