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270 Sugar Level Fasting

Extremely High Glucose Levels

Extremely High Glucose Levels

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. New to the forum and recently diagnosed as a Type 2. In fact, I was diagnosed a week ago today. I was told that my glucose levels were above 600mg when I was diagnosed in the ER. The ER doctor prescribed Glucotrol XL and I was taking it for the first 3 days after diagnosis. I saw my regular doctor on Monday and she prescribed a combination of Glucophage XR and Januvia. She also stopped the Glucotrol which I don't mind because it made me feel horrible for most of the day. I've been tracking my glucose levels and testing several times a day. My levels range from 270 to 320 in the morning before breakfast to 350 to 420 around lunch to 430 to 460 around dinner. These are averages for these times but my numbers are bouncing all over. I'm watching what I eat although I haven't seen a nutritionist yet. Now a little about me. I'm a 41 year-old African American male. I'm currently in the US military but will be retiring in the next few weeks. I'm 6' and weigh 270. I have a family history of diabetes - my mother and paternal grandfather. I have a history of high cholesterol and borderline to high blood pressure. I'm working on an improved workout plan to begin after my retirement. I'll have approximately two months to do nothing but work out and develop/practice better eating habits. The ER doctor says that I may be able to control my diabetes with weight loss and diet alone and my doctor agrees but we have to get my glucose numbers down. My question for you folks is how long before I may start to see improvements in my numbers? Besides eating healthier and exercising more, what else can I be doing to Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 270 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 270 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 270 mg/dl fasting? (or 14.98mmol/l) Blood sugar 270 mg/dl (14.98mmol/l) fasting - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar fasting and the result was 270 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: Very High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia / Dangerous) To improve your blood sugar fasting you need to lower your blood glucose level by 170mg/dl. Your fasting blood sugar level should always be below 100mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. Blood sugar testing measures how much glucose is in the bloodstream. No matter what is eaten, from a small snack to a large meal, blood glucose values rise in response to any carbohydrates that are digested. In a healthy person, the pancreas reacts to the higher blood glucose by releasing insulin, a hormone that converts blood sugar into usable energy. In addition to carbohydrates, other body processes also raise blood sugar levels.When a person fasts, which is defined medically as not eating or drinking anything aside from water for at least eight hours, the release of glucagon is triggered in the body. Glucagon instructs the liver to metabolize reserve supplies of glycogen, which are then circulated into the bloodstream as sugars. Accordingly, the amount of plasma glucose goes up. This is how the body creates energy even while fasting. In sum, when diabetes is not present the body responds to all blood sugars by manufacturing insulin in proportion with the glucose level. When it comes to fasting blood sugars, insulin lowers and stabilizes the levels so that they remain in a normal, healthy range. Yet when any form of diabetes is present, either pre-diabetes, Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes, the whole physiological process doesnt work correctly, and Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Do you have type 2 diabetes, or are you at risk for diabetes? Do you worry about your blood sugar? Then you’ve come to the right place. The disease diabetes (any type) means that you have too much sugar in your blood. This page will show you how to best check this. You can normalize your blood sugar naturally as needed – without pills, calorie counting or hunger. Many people have already done so. As a bonus, a normalized blood sugar usually makes you healthier and leaner. Table of contents: A disastrous epidemic Two types of diabetes Normalize your blood sugar Become your own evidence A disastrous epidemic What’s wrong? Why do more and more people become diabetic? In the past, before our modern Western diet, diabetes was extremely rare. The disease is now becoming more and more common. Around the world, more and more people are becoming diabetic: The number of people with diabetes is increasing incredibly rapidly and is heading towards 500 million. This is a world epidemic. Will someone in your family be affected next? Your mother, father, cousin, your child? Or you? Is perhaps your blood already too sweet? Those affected by the most common form of diabetes (type 2) normally never regain their health. Instead, we take for granted that they’ll become a little sicker for every year that goes by. With time they need more and more drugs. Yet, sooner or later complications emerge. Blindness. Dialysis due to faulty kidneys. Dementia. Amputations. Death. Diabetes epidemic causes inconceivable suffering. Fortunately, there’s something that can be done. We just need to see through the mistake that has led to the explosion of disease – and correct it. This can normalize your blood sugar. Many have already succeeded in doing this. If you already know that you are diabe Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar And Dizziness In The Morning

High Blood Sugar And Dizziness In The Morning

A high blood sugar level due to diabetes or other situations can cause a variety of symptoms such as dizziness, and it can even lead to blindness, nerve damage, heart disease and other chronic problems. Morning can be a common time for high blood sugar levels. Understanding what causes a spike in blood glucose and knowing what steps to take to lower it can help you to prevent complications. If your blood sugar level is high in the morning most of the time, it is important to speak with your physician. Video of the Day Your blood sugar level naturally fluctuates throughout the day. The foods you eat, your level of physical activity, stress, illnesses and medications can make your blood sugar levels rise and fall. In general, a normal fasting blood glucose level is below 100 mg/dL, the National Diabetes Education Program says. Once your level reaches between 100 mg/dL and 125 mg/dL, you may be diagnosed with prediabetes. If your level climbs over 125 mg/dL on more than one testing occasion, you may have diabetes. The medical term for a high level of blood sugar is hyperglycemia. Depending on the cause, it can take hours or days for your blood sugar levels to become so high that you develop symptoms. Symptoms of high blood sugar include not only dizziness but dry mouth, thirst, frequent urination, blurry vision, fatigue, confusion and increased appetite, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics reports. In general, the more severe your symptoms, the higher your blood sugar levels are. If you are having strong dizzy spells, seek medical attention. Both those with and without diabetes can experience "dawn phenomenon," and those with diabetes can experience the "Somogyi effect." During the early evening, insulin -- whether produced by the body or taken as medication -- works Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

How To Avoid Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

Blood sugar control is a main goal for people living with type 2 diabetes. High blood sugar levels can lead to a variety of complications over time, including nerve damage, heart disease, and vision problems. Blood sugar levels that are too low can cause more immediate problems, such as dizziness, confusion, and potentially a loss of consciousness. Keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible is key to preventing these complications and living well with type 2 diabetes. Blood Sugar Highs and Lows Glucose, or blood sugar, comes from two places — the food you eat and your liver. “Blood sugar is basically used to supply energy to the body,” explains Deborah Jane Wexler, MD, an endocrinologist in practice at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. For instance, one of your most valued organs — your brain — runs entirely on glucose, she notes. Insulin is used to move glucose into cells to be used for energy. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or can’t effectively use the insulin it does produce. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the blood, leading to high blood sugar levels. Low blood sugar can occur when you take too much diabetes medication, skip a meal, or increase your physical activity. Monitoring your blood sugar — by making sure it doesn’t spike too high or dip too low — is an important part of managing your type 2 diabetes. And you can start by learning the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and steps to take to bring those levels back to normal: Hypoglycemia: If blood sugar is too low — usually below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) — you may have symptoms such as confusion, sweating, nervousness, nausea, and dizziness. You could even pass out Continue reading >>

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

In the next two articles we’re going to discuss the concept of “normal” blood sugar. I say concept and put normal in quotation marks because what passes for normal in mainstream medicine turns out to be anything but normal if optimal health and function are what you’re interested in. Here’s the thing. We’ve confused normal with common. Just because something is common, doesn’t mean it’s normal. It’s now becoming common for kids to be overweight and diabetic because they eat nothing but refined flour, high-fructose corn syrup and industrial seed oils. Yet I don’t think anyone (even the ADA) would argue that being fat and metabolically deranged is even remotely close to normal for kids. Or adults, for that matter. In the same way, the guidelines the so-called authorities like the ADA have set for normal blood sugar may be common, but they’re certainly not normal. Unless you think it’s normal for people to develop diabetic complications like neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular disease as they age, and spend the last several years of their lives in hospitals or assisted living facilities. Common, but not normal. In this article I’m going to introduce the three markers we use to measure blood sugar, and tell you what the conventional model thinks is normal for those markers. In the next article, I’m going to show you what the research says is normal for healthy people. And I’m also going to show you that so-called normal blood sugar, as dictated by the ADA, can double your risk of heart disease and lead to all kinds of complications down the road. The 3 ways blood sugar is measured Fasting blood glucose This is still the most common marker used in clinical settings, and is often the only one that gets tested. The fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

270 Fasting Bs :( | Sparkpeople

270 Fasting Bs :( | Sparkpeople

You've got this. I've been there. My sugars were 450-500 and my A1C was like 11 - 13. It's now 5.5. This is an overwhelming process. The key word being process. Start with making small changes one at a time. So these changes become changes of a lifetime. So glad you are starting this process. Everyone's body is different. I found eliminating processed foods and controlling my carbs helped me tremoudously. I also started walking. Small steps. April 2017 Actively planning and preparing Well my A1C tests result is back and it was 8.9 :( But I am determined to lower it! Last night before bed my BS was 131, the lowest I have tested it so far. My FBS this morning was 144. I realized though that I take the abilify at night right before bed & the doctor said it may raise my BS so that might be why my morning numbers are higher. 185 on my fourth anniversary of July 7, 2010 Joined weight watchers on 10/18/10 @ 188.0/after multiple 17 week passes took a break on 2/11/12 I know how easy it is to get off track. But it is so important to stay within normal ranges. You can do it. I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. 152 is so much better than 214. That is a huge difference. Now you can work on getting them even lower..... I appreciate everyone to this thread. I had much the same questions since I had just been diagnosed as Type 2. The FBS test at the lab was 300 and my A1C was 11. I've been on metformin a week now. Definitely helping. Thanks! I think I can! I think I can! I think I can! - The Little Engine That Could This morning I tested as soon as I woke up & didn't use alcohol. It was 152, which while still high is way way lower then it was so yay. Thank you guys a bunch that was really helpful :) I will start testing at night as well to see if I notice anything. Continue reading >>

What Are Critical Glucose Ranges?

What Are Critical Glucose Ranges?

Patients with diabetes try to keep their glucose levels in the normal range to prevent damage to internal organs and nerves, and to preserve their eyesight. They work with physicians as well as specialist nurses and dietitians to achieve this. Patients with type II diabetics, may have had symptoms of high blood glucose that led them to seek care, but often this type of diabetes is diagnosed by routine blood tests. With proper care, blood glucose levels may never reach a critical level. Type I diabetes, treated with insulin, is usually much more difficult to control, especially in adolescence. Type I diabetics are far more likely to have a critical glucose level at some time in their lives. Video of the Day Called hypoglycemia, this deficiency of glucose in the blood is considered critical at, or below, 40 milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood, or 40 mg/dL. However, this figure must be adjusted individually, as the exact level at which an a person develops symptoms varies. Insulin and other diabetes medications can cause hypoglycemia under certain conditions. As an example, skipping a meal, but taking the usual dose of insulin can cause hypoglycemia. With Type II diabetes, medication errors and drug interactions can cause hypoglycemia. It is suggested that diabetics not drive with a level below 70. According to “Understanding Pathophysiology,” the initial symptoms of headache, weakness, pallor, intense hunger, shakiness and irritability can occur with levels of 45 to 60 mg/dL. This must be treated with an immediate replacement of glucose. Severe hypoglycemia can lead to seizures, coma and even death. Blood glucose levels that are not in the critical range are not necessarily healthy ones. The American Diabetes Association has established ideal glucose levels: Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 270 | Dailystrength

Blood Sugar 270 | Dailystrength

I just tested my blood and it was 266 and then I was in so much shock I immediately retested and it was 270. OMG- I have never had it that high. The highest I have ever tested was 200. I can't believe it. What am I doing wrong? I have been going through some really high #'s myself, and when I get the high readings , I get completely stressed out, which makes them even higher.. I have NEVER had any high readings before now,(except when I lost my daddy in 2007) My Dr did increase my meds, Did you eat anything different? in my case, I have athritis and Fibro, and my high readings were due to pain. Try not to get too upset , you might even do what I did when they started running high, I started writing everything down, like i did when I was first diagnosed. Let me know. I do think we all get a high reading every once in a while. Take care, God Bless You! Lori Did it start to come down? If you had eaten something high in carbs it would have spiked. I never go that high either & the other day ate really bad & when I tested it was 252. I waited about 1 hr & went to 230 and the next morning it was 103. You can try some exercise to see if that will help bring it down. Go for a 20 minute walk & see if that helps. Good luck! Diabetes can be such a trial! You must've eaten something or something(s) in the same day that did it and kept it up - think back. It happens, Sometimes after we have diabetes for a while, we see our sugar reading staying pretty level, We start slowly eating things we didn't eat very often or start eating a little larger servings. When I start getting higher readings I go back to watching what I eat and watching portion sizes. Some times because diabetes is progressive you your meds adjusted. Other times You can't find a reason, you just drink Continue reading >>

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

The emergency condition most type 2s dread is hypoglycemia, where plummeting blood sugar levels can bring on a dangerous semi-conscious state, and even coma or death. However, hyperglycemia, high-blood sugar levels consistently above 240 mg/dL, can be just as dangerous. Left untreated, at its most extreme high-blood sugar, can induce ketoacidosis, the build-up of toxic-acid ketones in the blood and urine. It can also bring on nausea, weakness, fruity-smelling breath, shortness of breath, and, as with hypoglycemia, coma. However, once they’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, most type 2s have taken steps to prevent or lessen the most dangerous effects of high-blood sugar levels. Their concern shifts to dealing with unexpected, sometimes alarming spikes in blood sugar levels. The symptoms of those spikes are the classic ones we associate with the onset of diabetes—unquenchable thirst, excessive urination, fatigue, weight loss, and headaches. When you do spike, what can you do right away to bring blood sugar levels down? Immediate Steps You Can Take: 1. Insulin—If you are on an insulin regimen; a bolus injection should drive numbers down fairly rapidly. 2. If you are not on insulin or don’t use fast-acting insulin, taking a brisk walk or bike ride works for most people to start bringing their numbers down. 3. Stay hydrated. Hyperglycemic bodies want to shed excess sugar, leading to frequent urination and dehydration. You need to drink water steadily until your numbers drop. 4. Curb your carb intake. It does not matter how complex the carbs in your diet are, your body still converts them to glucose at some point. Slacking off on carb consumption is a trackable maneuver that lets you better understand how to control your numbers. Preventative Steps: These are extensions Continue reading >>

What Are Considered Dangerous Blood Sugar Levels? - Mobile Wisegeek

What Are Considered Dangerous Blood Sugar Levels? - Mobile Wisegeek

wiseGEEK: What are Considered Dangerous Blood Sugar Levels? If an individual's sustained blood sugar falls below 55 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or measures higher than 180mg/dL, he is considered to have dangerous blood sugar levels. Normal blood sugar levels typically range from 82 to 110mg/dL, but these tend to fluctuate when an individual eats or forgets to eat. If at any point an individual's blood sugar measures below or above the 55 to 180mg/dL thresholds, however, he might begin experiencing the effects of abnormal blood levels, including dizziness , fatigue, and weakness. If these dangerous levels are sustained over a period of time, there is an increased possibility of serious medical issues. Blood sugar levels are measured in a variety of ways, but the most common test is to introduce glucose -indicating enzymes, such as hexokinase, into a blood sample. The changes are then tracked and measured. Should the sample indicate blood sugar levels that are extremely low or high, further testing may be needed to confirm the reading. Depending on the final results, the patient may be diagnosed with either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Hypoglycemia, in which an individual's blood sugar levels consistently measure below 60mg/dL, often causes fatigue, nausea, and an unhealthy pallor. Without enough sugar in the blood to fuel metabolic processes, important cells and tissue can suffer serious damage. Individuals with dangerously low blood sugar levels can experience significant nerve damage, with the more severe cases resulting in comas or death. When an individual has dangerously high blood sugar levels, he develops hyperglycemia. Unlike in hypoglycemia, the effects of hyperglycemia typically go unnoticed until the condition worsens to a significant degree. In many c Continue reading >>

Glucose Level Is 270 - ? - Diabetes - Type 2 - Medhelp

Glucose Level Is 270 - ? - Diabetes - Type 2 - Medhelp

Just got results fromannual bloodwork.Glucose level was 270 and this was a fasting blood test.They told me it was high-How bad is it?My dr. was suspicious because I have lost weight and have a few other symptoms.SoI am glad they tested, but do not have a follow up appt for another month.Any info is appreciated.:) " Glucose level was 270 and this was a fasting blood test.They told me it was high-How bad is it?" For starters, it's good you posted and question your doctors attitude. Normal fasting glucose levels range from 60/70 to 99 mg/dl. As you can see you're three times above the normal range. If you didn't fast properly - meaning you had a small nibble on some food or sipped on colored liquids8-10 hours prior to testing - your test results will be skewered. You also didn't mention what those "few other symptoms" were. An infection like a cold can skewer results too. It's important to know what medication, if any, you were taking prior to and the day of the test. Certain medications are known to raise glucose levels. A retest is in order. You should ask for an A1c test. The A1c is the current gold standard in identifying glucose levels by measuring your glucose over the past 2-3 months. Why go back 2-3 months? Excess glucose binds to the outside of new red blood cells [rbc] never getting absorbed or burnt off for energy. RBC's live on average 2-3 months, the A1c captures this. No fasting is required. Normal is <5%.Good luck Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia

Not to be confused with the opposite disorder, hypoglycemia. Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar (also spelled hyperglycaemia or hyperglycæmia) is a condition in which an excessive amount of glucose circulates in the blood plasma. This is generally a blood sugar level higher than 11.1 mmol/l (200 mg/dl), but symptoms may not start to become noticeable until even higher values such as 15–20 mmol/l (~250–300 mg/dl). A subject with a consistent range between ~5.6 and ~7 mmol/l (100–126 mg/dl) (American Diabetes Association guidelines) is considered slightly hyperglycemic, while above 7 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) is generally held to have diabetes. For diabetics, glucose levels that are considered to be too hyperglycemic can vary from person to person, mainly due to the person's renal threshold of glucose and overall glucose tolerance. On average however, chronic levels above 10–12 mmol/L (180–216 mg/dL) can produce noticeable organ damage over time. Signs and symptoms[edit] The degree of hyperglycemia can change over time depending on the metabolic cause, for example, impaired glucose tolerance or fasting glucose, and it can depend on treatment.[1] Temporary hyperglycemia is often benign and asymptomatic. Blood glucose levels can rise well above normal and cause pathological and functional changes for significant periods without producing any permanent effects or symptoms. [1] During this asymptomatic period, an abnormality in carbohydrate metabolism can occur which can be tested by measuring plasma glucose. [1] However, chronic hyperglycemia at above normal levels can produce a very wide variety of serious complications over a period of years, including kidney damage, neurological damage, cardiovascular damage, damage to the retina or damage to feet and legs. Diabetic n Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hyperglycemia

Diabetes And Hyperglycemia

Tweet Hyperglycemia occurs when people with diabetes have too much sugar in their bloodstream. Hyperglycemia should not be confused with hypoglycemia, which is when blood sugar levels go too low. You should aim to avoid spending long periods of time with high blood glucose levels. What is hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia, the term for expressing high blood sugar, has been defined by the World Health Organisation as: Blood glucose levels greater than 7.0 mmol/L (126 mg/dl) when fasting Blood glucose levels greater than 11.0 mmol/L (200 mg/dl) 2 hours after meals Although blood sugar levels exceeding 7 mmol/L for extended periods of time can start to cause damage to internal organs, symptoms may not develop until blood glucose levels exceed 11 mmol/L. What causes hyperglycemia? The underlying cause of hyperglycemia will usually be from loss of insulin producing cells in the pancreas or if the body develops resistance to insulin. More immediate reasons for hyperglycemia include: Missing a dose of diabetic medication, tablets or insulin Eating more carbohydrates than your body and/or medication can manage Being mentally or emotionally stressed (injury, surgery or anxiety) Contracting an infection What are the symptoms of hyperglycemia? The main 3 symptoms of high blood sugar levels are increased urination, increased thirst and increased hunger. High blood sugar levels can also contribute to the following symptoms: Regular/above-average urination Weakness or feeling tired Increased thirst Vision blurring Is hyperglycemia serious? Hyperglycemia can be serious if: Blood glucose levels stay high for extended periods of time - this can lead to the development of long term complications Blood glucose levels rise dangerously high - this can lead to short term complications In the shor Continue reading >>

Sugar Is 270 Right Now.

Sugar Is 270 Right Now.

Hello--- its been awhile since I posted anything. Right now my sugar is 270. I think that is really high for me. is there certain things I can do to bring it down? I took my medicine around 1030p. Actually, it would be better for you now not to exercise. When you're high, exercise can make your blood sugar higher. What did you eat tonight? Are you usually this high? I would let your doctor know in the morning. If you're typically running this high or higher, you may need different or more medication. Can you tell us what meds or insulin you are currently on and what doses? If you are only on oral meds and get high bgs there is really no immediate way to bring bgs down. Certain oral meds may stimulate your pancreas to produce more insulin, so they may help a little. What is your current diet like? Many of us are very sensitives to certain foods and continuing to eat those foods even on medication will assure that we have higher bgs. I see you are recently diagnosed. It probably took me a good 2 years to finally get my bgs consistently under 140 and even with great diet, exercise and metformin I still have times when my bgs go haywire. That is diabetes. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. Continue reading >>

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