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157 Blood Sugar

Blood Sugar Level Chart

Blood Sugar Level Chart

A blood sugar level chart can help you understand the levels of healthy blood sugar. Some of the tests listed below must be prescribed and administered by a doctor or medical clinic, but you can also use these charts along with a glucometer (a tool to test blood sugar at home) to decide which foods cause blood sugar spikes, and which to avoid to maintain low levels of blood sugar and hence, good health. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Fasting Blood Sugar Test Fasting blood sugar is a measurement of your blood sugar after not eating for 8-12 hours. This test is normally included with a CBC (complete blood chemistry) blood test. A CBC is a test often ordered by doctors when doing a complete health evaluation. Fasting blood sugars are evaluated as follows: Fasting blood sugars after 8-12 without food: Normal blood sugar range: between 60- 100 mg/dL Pre -Diabetic range: between 101- 126 mg /dL Diabetic range: more than 126 mg/dL on two different blood test occasions Oral Glucose Tolerance Test An oral glucose tolerance test is used to test the body’s ability to metabolize a specific amount of glucose, clear it from the blood stream and return blood sugar levels to normal. The patient is asked to eat normally for several days before the test. No food should be taken for 8-10 hours before the test, and there is no eating during the test. To begin the test, a fasting blood sugar is taken. Then the patient drinks a sweet liquid which contains approximately 75 grams of sugar in the form of glucose. The drink must be finished in 5 minutes. After sitting quietly for one to two hours, the patient’s blood sugar is re-tested and evaluated as follows on this blood s Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Monitoring

Blood Sugar Monitoring

What Do the Numbers Tell You? “I must admit that I stopped checking my blood sugar,” Dave said. “I used to stick myself and write the numbers in a book, but I had no idea what they meant. I’d eat the same thing and get different numbers. Finally, I just gave up.” Sound familiar? Many people dutifully check their blood glucose levels but have no idea what the numbers mean. Part of the problem is that blood glucose levels constantly fluctuate and are influenced by many factors. The other part of the problem is that no two people are alike. A blood glucose reading of 158 mg/dl in two different people might have two different explanations. Most people know that their bodies need glucose to fuel their activities and that certain foods or large quantities of almost any food will raise blood glucose. That’s the easy part. But just as cars require a complicated system of fuel pumps, ignition timing, batteries, pistons, and a zillion other things to convert gasoline into motion, our bodies rely on an intricate system to convert glucose into energy. Back to basics Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas that helps regulate the way the body uses glucose. Its main job is to allow glucose in the blood to enter cells of the body where it can be used for energy. In people who don’t have diabetes, the pancreas changes how much insulin it releases depending on blood glucose levels. Eating a chocolate bar? The pancreas releases more insulin. Sleeping? The pancreas releases less insulin until the wee hours of the morning when the hormones secreted in the early morning naturally increase insulin resistance, so the pancreas needs to release a little more. Insulin also controls how much glucose is produced and released from the liver. Glucose is stored in the liver in a f Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 157 Mg/dl (8.71mmol/l) Fasting - Is That Good Or Bad?

Blood Sugar 157 Mg/dl (8.71mmol/l) Fasting - Is That Good Or Bad?

In addition to carbohydrates, other body processes also raise blood sugar levels.When a person fasts, which is defined medically as not eating or drinking anything aside from water for at least eight hours, the release of glucagon is triggered in the body. Glucagon instructs the liver to metabolize reserve supplies of glycogen, which are then circulated into the bloodstream as sugars. Accordingly, the amount of plasma glucose goes up. This is how the body creates energy even while fasting. In sum, when diabetes is not present the body responds to all blood sugars by manufacturing insulin in proportion with the glucose level. When it comes to fasting blood sugars, insulin lowers and stabilizes the levels so that they remain in a normal, healthy range. Yet when any form of diabetes is present, either pre-diabetes, Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes, the whole physiological process doesn’t work correctly, and blood sugars are often considerably higher than normal. The fasting blood sugar test (FBS) is commonly used to detect the existence of diabetes. The 1 Worst Carb That Causes Weight Gain After Age 50 Ad If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 Learn more In order to prepare for a fasting blood sugar test, one must refrain from eating or drinking from eight to twelve hours before the test, depending upon the doctor’s instructions. It is conducted in the same manner as any laboratory blood test. The health professional will wrap an elastic band around the upper arm in order to restrict blood flow, which enlarges the veins and facilitates the insertion of a needle. After disinfecting the site with alcohol, a needle is placed into the vein and blood is drawn into a vial, which will be then be sent for laboratory testing. A no Continue reading >>

Healthy Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women

Healthy Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women

Diabetes that begins during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. This condition affects 5 to 9 percent of all pregnancies in the United States, and it is becoming more common, according to a July 2009 article in "American Family Physician." Pregnancy also aggravates preexisting type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Blood sugar levels that are consistently too high during pregnancy can cause problems for both mother and infant. Video of the Day Diabetes during pregnancy increases the likelihood of congenital malformations, or birth defects, in infants, particularly if your blood glucose is poorly controlled for the first 10 weeks of pregnancy. High blood sugars also contribute to excessive fetal growth, which makes labor and delivery difficult and increases the likelihood of infant fractures or nerve injuries. Large infants are more likely to be delivered via cesarean section. Newborns of diabetic mothers are at risk for respiratory distress, jaundice and dangerously low blood calcium or glucose levels. Gestational diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugars exceed specified levels following two glucose tolerance tests. The first test, usually performed between the 24th and 28th week of your pregnancy, involves drinking 50 g of a sugar solution and checking your blood glucose one hour later. If your level is above 130 mg/dL, your doctor will probably order a second glucose tolerance test that measures your blood glucose when you are fasting and then each hour for 2 to 3 hours after the test. A fasting glucose higher than 95 mg/dL, a one-hour level above 180 mg/dL, a two-hour level over 155 mg/dL or a three-hour measurement over 140 mg/dL is diagnostic of gestational diabetes. For pregnant women without diabetes, average fasting glucose levels vary between 69 mg/dL and 75 mg/ Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 157 Mg/dl (8.71mmol/l) After Eating - Is That Good Or Bad?

Blood Sugar 157 Mg/dl (8.71mmol/l) After Eating - Is That Good Or Bad?

It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the body’s inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: • Age 50 and under: Less than 140 mg/dl • Age 50 – 60: Less than 150 mg/dl • Over age 60: Less than 160 mg/dl A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individual’s particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a person’s postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. • Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. • Extreme stress: Stress produces the body’s fight-or-flight response triggering the release of stress hormones such as cortisol. These hormones cause the body to release the glucose it has previously stored for energy. • Eating or drinking after the meal and before testing the blood sugar: Continuing to eat will keep blood sugars closer to their immediate post-meal levels. Studies show that 15 to 20 minutes of moderate exercise, such as walking, shortly after a meal may improve glucos Continue reading >>

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

The emergency condition most type 2s dread is hypoglycemia, where plummeting blood sugar levels can bring on a dangerous semi-conscious state, and even coma or death. However, hyperglycemia, high-blood sugar levels consistently above 240 mg/dL, can be just as dangerous. Left untreated, at its most extreme high-blood sugar, can induce ketoacidosis, the build-up of toxic-acid ketones in the blood and urine. It can also bring on nausea, weakness, fruity-smelling breath, shortness of breath, and, as with hypoglycemia, coma. However, once they’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, most type 2s have taken steps to prevent or lessen the most dangerous effects of high-blood sugar levels. Their concern shifts to dealing with unexpected, sometimes alarming spikes in blood sugar levels. The symptoms of those spikes are the classic ones we associate with the onset of diabetes—unquenchable thirst, excessive urination, fatigue, weight loss, and headaches. When you do spike, what can you do right away to bring blood sugar levels down? Immediate Steps You Can Take: 1. Insulin—If you are on an insulin regimen; a bolus injection should drive numbers down fairly rapidly. 2. If you are not on insulin or don’t use fast-acting insulin, taking a brisk walk or bike ride works for most people to start bringing their numbers down. 3. Stay hydrated. Hyperglycemic bodies want to shed excess sugar, leading to frequent urination and dehydration. You need to drink water steadily until your numbers drop. 4. Curb your carb intake. It does not matter how complex the carbs in your diet are, your body still converts them to glucose at some point. Slacking off on carb consumption is a trackable maneuver that lets you better understand how to control your numbers. Preventative Steps: These are extensions Continue reading >>

Is 157 Mg/dl Blood Sugar From A Glucose Test Normal?

Is 157 Mg/dl Blood Sugar From A Glucose Test Normal?

Here we will look at a 157 mg/dL blood sugar level from a Glucose test result and tell you what it may mean. Is 157 mg/dL blood sugar good or bad? Note that blood sugar tests should be done multiple times and the 157 mg/dL blood sugar level should be an average of those numbers. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, there is a Fasting Glucose Test and a Random Glucose Test. Below you can see what different results may mean. Fasting Glucose Test 70 - 100 mg/dL = Normal 101 - 125 mg/dL = Prediabetes 126 and above = Diabetes Therefore, according to the chart above, if the 157 mg/dL blood sugar level was from a Fasting Glucose Test, then it may indicate diabetes. Random Glucose Test Below 125 mg/dL = Normal 126 - 199 mg/dL = Prediabetes 200 and above = Diabetes If the test result of a 157 mg/dL blood sugar level was from a Random Glucose Test, then the result would indicate it to be in the prediabetes range. Is 158 mg/dL Blood Sugar from a Glucose test normal? Go here for the next blood sugar level on our list. google_ad_client="ca-pub-5465481939459128";google_ad_slot="8353216499";google_ad_format="301x250";google_adsbygoogle_status="done";google_full_width_responsive_allowed=false;google_fwr_non_expansion_reason=4;google_responsive_formats=3;google_ad_width=301;google_ad_height=250;google_ad_resizable=true;google_override_format=1;google_responsive_auto_format=1;google_loader_features_used=128;google_ad_modifications={"plle":true,"eids":["38893301","21061122","191880502"],"loeids":["38893311"]};google_loader_used="aa";google_reactive_tag_first=true;google_ad_unit_key="2718888811";google_ad_dom_fingerprint="1336929022";google_sailm=false;google_unique_id=3;google_async_iframe_id="aswift_2";google_start_time=1514569396040;google_pub_vars="JTdCJTIyZ29vZ2xlX2FkX2 Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

The Why I am a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, have run Diabetes Centers in hospitals, have a private practice in medical nutrition therapy specializing in metabolic syndrome, weight loss, and type 2 diabetes, and have written a NY Times Bestselling book on the same topics. January 10, 2012 was the world-wide release of my newest book, The Diabetes Miracle. I have had type 2 diabetes for 15 years. Guess what? If you asked me what my blood sugar is right now, I have no idea. Neither do you! Did you know that unless your blood sugar is over 200mg/dL, you most likely will have none of the traditional diabetes symptoms such as excessive thirst, urination, fatigue, hunger, or wounds that will not heal? If you’ve run blood sugar over 200mg/dL for a period of time, you probably won’t even have symptoms when your sugar exceeds that 200mg/dL point. If you have been prescribed medication for diabetes that is aimed at reducing your blood sugar and you begin to feel shaky, dizzy, nauseated, can’t speak clearly, can’t think, feel wiped out….you may assume that you are hypoglycemic. Are you? Without testing, you really have no idea…your once high readings may have returned to normal range…and your body may assume you are hypoglycemic when you are far from it! If you grab some juice or glucose tabs, you will push that normal sugar right back into the very high range. Or maybe those symptoms really are hypoglycemia and if you don’t treat it, you will lose consciousness, fall down the stairs, drop your child, run off the road. Your Hemoglobin A1C might be 6.3 and you think to yourself: “Wow, my blood sugar is now normal…why should I spend the money and take the time to test?” Do you realize that hemoglobin A1C is your average blood sugar 24 ho Continue reading >>

High Morning Blood Sugar

High Morning Blood Sugar

by Mary (Sacramento, Ca.) QUESTION: I can go to bed at night and my blood sugar is 112 but in the morning its 157 and when I fast it goes up..why?? ANSWER: Hi Mary, To give an exact answer to your question, I need to know if you're a diabetic or not, your age and some of your lifestyle habits and foods you use to eat. Anyway, although I don't have all these information, I will try to give an explanation to your morning high blood sugar. If you think you're not a diabetic, you shouldn't exclude the possibility you might have diabetes. Here's what happens: If you go to bed with normal blood sugar levels, during night (exactly early in the morning 4-5 am) there are some substances (hormones) our body produces to wake us up. They are called "stress" hormones, which raise blood sugar levels. In a normal person, this rise is accompanied with increase in insulin levels too. As a consequence, a normal person is woken up without having high blood glucose. In a diabetic, this doesn't happen, especially for type 2 diabetics. Their body still produces a little of insulin, but the insulin is not able to transport the glucose inside the body cells. Thus, glucose remains in the bloodstream and diabetics they wake up with high blood sugar levels and high insulin levels (induced by high blood sugar). What you can do, you may check again your fasting blood sugar levels, do an oral glucose tolerance test and check your A1C level in a lab. In this way you'll make sure if you have diabetes or not and what precautions you must take. Hope I answered your question. Take care! Dr.Alba High Sugar level at the morning by: Anonymous COMMENT: I have the same problem, before bed, it is normal but when wake up in the morning, the blood sugar level rasies up to 144. I am not taking any medicine and th Continue reading >>

When To Test Blood Sugar After Meals

When To Test Blood Sugar After Meals

For some reason the past week brought me a bunch of emails all asking the same question: Are we supposed to test our blood sugar one hour after we start or end a meal? As is true with everything involving diabetes the answer is not simple due to variations in individual blood sugar responses. The reason we test one hour after a meals is to learn how high our blood sugar goes in response to the specific meal. So we want to be testing at the moment when our blood sugar is at its peak. Studies tell us something about the average time it takes for the carbohydrate in our food to turn into blood sugar (carbohydrates are the main nutrient that causes elevated blood sugars). Such studies suggest that most Americans who eat our meals fairly quickly will see a peak somewhere between one hour and seventy-five minutes after we start eating. But because studies only come up with averages, they don't take into account individual variations--and you are, of course, an individual. And when we move from group averages to individual response we learn that when the blood sugar peak occurs depends on a multitude of factors that include how fast we eat our meals, how much we eat at each meal, how tightly bound the glucose is in the carbohydrates we eat, and how efficient our digestive system is at digesting the carbohydrate bound in our food. That explains why the same meal consumed at the same time by two different people may peak at different times--and why I can't tell you exactly when to test. That's why you might try varying the time at which you test a carefully chosen test meal to see if your personal peak is later than average. Choose a simple meal that contains a known quantity of carbohydrate--a single measured portion of something rather than a meal where you have to guess what Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Symptoms?

High Blood Sugar Symptoms?

Under the Julian Bakery Bread thread, a poster named Aurelia asks Do you also have noticeable physical symptoms of elevated blood sugar? I know when my blood sugar rises over about 130 because my heart starts to hammer and I feel flushed. At your peak of 157 I would also be nauseated. I have wondered how common that is. No, no real symptoms. I felt a little tired, but that could be, you know, being tired. Other than that, nothing. When doing tests like this in the past, I've learned that my hunger kicks in not so much in response to a particular blood sugar level, but in response to a really fast decline. Didn't get one here. I was hungry by the end of the test time, but then it was pushing dinner time, I probably would have been hungry anyway. My true fasting BG runs a little high, anyway, anywhere from 95 (high normal) to 110 (prediabetic.) This worried me some, until just the other day. Under the thread "Well, Hmmmmm..." about intermittent fasting, there's a response about my concern with my fasting BG, with a link to the Hyperlipid blog (which has been added to the blogroll.) The author explains that long-time low carbing actually does result in mildly elevated fasting BG, because it increases insulin resistance. Sounds bad, but turns out it's not. It's a normal response to the muscle cells learning to run on free fatty acids and ketones -- since they don't need glucose anymore, they shunt it back to the bloodstream, where it's available for tissues that can better use it, like the brain. This explains why, in Atkins Diabetes Revolution, the new book by Dr. Mary Vernon and Jacqueline Eberstein, who completed the book Dr. Atkins had long planned to write, it is stated that if you have been on a low carb diet for any length of time, you must spend at least a few days Continue reading >>

A1c Calculator*

A1c Calculator*

Average blood glucose and the A1C test Your A1C test result (also known as HbA1c or glycated hemoglobin) can be a good general gauge of your diabetes control, because it provides an average blood glucose level over the past few months. Unlike daily blood glucose test results, which are reported as mg/dL, A1C is reported as a percentage. This can make it difficult to understand the relationship between the two. For example, if you check blood glucose 100 times in a month, and your average result is 190 mg/dL this would lead to an A1C of approximately 8.2%, which is above the target of 7% or lower recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for many adults who are not pregnant. For some people, a tighter goal of 6.5% may be appropriate, and for others, a less stringent goal such as 8% may be better.1 Talk to your doctor about the right goal for you. GET YOURS FREE The calculation below is provided to illustrate the relationship between A1C and average blood glucose levels. This calculation is not meant to replace an actual lab A1C result, but to help you better understand the relationship between your test results and your A1C. Use this information to become more familiar with the relationship between average blood glucose levels and A1C—never as a basis for changing your disease management. See how average daily blood sugar may correlate to A1C levels.2 Enter your average blood sugar reading and click Calculate. *Please discuss this additional information with your healthcare provider to gain a better understanding of your overall diabetes management plan. The calculation should not be used to make therapy decisions or changes. What is A1C? Performed by your doctor during your regular visits, your A1C test measures your average blood sugar levels by taking a Continue reading >>

You Don't Have To Be Diabetic To Check Your Blood Sugar

You Don't Have To Be Diabetic To Check Your Blood Sugar

Checking your blood sugar (glucose) has become an easy and relatively inexpensive tool that just about anybody can incorporate into health habits. More often than not, it can provide you with some unexpected insights about your response to diet. You and I can now purchase our own blood glucose monitor at stores like Walmart and Walgreens for $10-20. (You will also need to purchase the fingerstick lancets and test strips; the test strips are the most costly part of the picture, usually running $0.50 to $1.00 per test strip. But since people without diabetes check their blood sugar only occasionally, the cost of the test strips is, over time, modest.) If you’re not a diabetic, why bother checking blood sugar? New studies are documenting the fact that increased levels of blood sugar below the diabetic range are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease. In the 22,000-participant DECODE study, for example, risk for heart attack and death from heart disease increased statistically beginning at a fasting blood sugar ≥110 mg/dl. Even more than fasting blood sugars, after-eating,or postprandial, blood sugars are proving to be a powerful predictor of heart attack. In other words, the increase in blood sugar that occurs in the 1-2 hours after a meal has been associated with greater risk for heart disease: the higher the blood sugar after a meal, the greater the risk for heart disease. While it is not clear where begins to increase, but long-term risk for heart disease is 30-60% greater at 140 mg/dl. What does blood sugar have to do with heart disease? It is becoming clear that surges in blood sugar that occur after a meal (or after soft drinks, cookies, or other snacks) injures arteries, triggering inflammatory and antioxidative responses. Even a single su Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 157 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 157 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 157 mg/dl after eating? (or 8.71mmol/l) Blood sugar 157 mg/dl (8.71mmol/l) after eating - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar after eating and the result was 157 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: To improve your blood sugar after eating you need to lower your blood glucose level by 17mg/dl. Your blood sugar level (up to 2 hours) after eating should always be below 140mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the bodys inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individuals particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a persons postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Extreme stress: Stress produces the bodys fight-or-flight response triggering the release of stress hormones suc Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: Fasting Vs. Postprandial

Blood Sugar: Fasting Vs. Postprandial

Peter's fasting blood glucose: 89 mg/dl--perfect. After one whole wheat bagel, apple, black coffee: 157 mg/dl--diabetic-range. How common is this: Normal fasting blood sugar with diabetic range postprandial (after-eating) blood sugar? It is shockingly common. The endocrinologists have known this for some years, since a number of studies using oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) have demonstrated that fasting glucose is not a good method of screening people for diabetes or pre-diabetes, nor does it predict the magnitude of postprandial glucose. (In an OGTT, you usually drink 75 grams of glucose as a cola drink, followed by blood sugar checks. The conventional cut off for "impaired glucose tolerance" is 140-200 mg/dl; diabetes is 200 mg/dl or greater.) People with glucose levels during OGTT as high as 200 mg/dl may have normal fasting values below 100 mg/dl. High postprandial glucose values are a coronary risk factor. While conventional guidelines say that a postprandial glucose (i.e., during OGTT) of 140 mg/dl or greater is a concern, coronary risk starts well below this. Risk is increased approximately 50% at 126 mg/dl. Risk may begin with postprandial glucoses as low as 100 mg/dl. For this reason, postprandial (not OGTT) glucose checks are becoming an integral part of the Track Your Plaque program. We encourage postprandial blood glucose checks, followed by efforts to reduce postprandial glucose if they are high. More on this in future. Continue reading >>

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