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134 Glucose Level During Pregnancy

Managing Diabetes During Pregnancy

Managing Diabetes During Pregnancy

Almost two million women of reproductive age have diabetes, and these numbers continue to rise, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is extremely important for women with diabetes to achieve normal blood glucose levels before they become pregnant, because if women have poorly controlled diabetes going into a pregnancy, they are at much higher risk for serious fetal complications. This improved control can be accomplished with education and medical management. Women with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes are also at higher risk for: Large birth weight babies, resulting in more Cesarean deliveries and increased complications during delivery Premature births or fetal death Pre-eclampsia: a dangerous surge in blood pressure associated with protein in the urine Diabetic retinopathy: damage to the retina caused by high glucose levels Diabetic kidney disease Severe hypoglycemia: episodes of low blood glucose levels that can result in confusion or unconsciousness Ensuring a healthy pregnancy The good news is that women with uncomplicated diabetes who keep their blood glucose levels in a normal range before and during pregnancy have about the same chance of having a successful pregnancy as women without diabetes. The Joslin-Beth Israel Deaconess Pregnancy Program recommends the following blood glucose goals and medical assessments before pregnancy: Fasting and pre-meal blood glucose: 80-110 mg/dl Blood glucose one hour after meal: 100-155 mg/dl A1C, a blood test that measures average blood glucose over two to three months: less than 7 percent and as close to 6% as possible without hypoglycemia Review of diabetes and obstetrical history Eye evaluations to screen for and discuss risks of diabetic retinopathy Renal, thyroid, gynecological and sometimes c Continue reading >>

Natural Pregnancy – Gestational Diabetes Test Alternatives

Natural Pregnancy – Gestational Diabetes Test Alternatives

Let me start off by saying that gestational diabetes is a condition that should be taken very seriously. If there had not been a viable alternative, I would have sucked it up and drank that nasty, orange glucose drink for the sake of my health and my baby’s. But the good news is that there are alternatives and if you wouldn’t usually willingly gulp down a large, sugary beverage and are worried about the effects a real food diet could have on the test results, talk with your healthcare provider about your options (Read: I am not a doctor and only your healthcare provider can advise you on your risk and your options). Along with these testing alternatives, I would also like to offer you my own personal guidance. You can learn more about managing your diet during and after pregnancy in my book, The Everything Paleo Pregnancy Book. What is gestational diabetes? According to babycenter.com, gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that between 2 and 10 percent of expectant mothers develop during pregnancy. Because of the hormonal changes to your digestive system during pregnancy, it is possible for your cells to become less responsive to insulin. If your pancreas can’t produce enough insulin to keep up with your body’s demand, you can have too much glucose in your bloodstream and develop gestational diabetes. There are certain factors that may put you at a higher risk for developing gestational diabetes, such as body mass index, a diagnosis of gestational diabetes in previous pregnancies, the presence of sugar in your urine or a family history of diabetes. Excessive first trimester weight gain has also been linked with a higher occurrence of gestational diabetes. It is possible to develop gestational diabetes without the presence of any of these risk factors, which Continue reading >>

Chart For Blood Sugar Levels

Chart For Blood Sugar Levels

Making healthy lifestyle choices can certainly lower the risk of hyperglycemia, as well as hypoglycemia. The following Buzzle write-up provides a chart for blood sugar levels that will help you monitor the blood sugar levels, so that you can take steps to keep them within the normal range. Glucose is our body's primary source of energy. During digestion, the carbohydrate-rich food items get converted into glucose, which is then absorbed into the bloodstream. The levels of blood glucose or blood sugar are regulated with the help of insulin. Insulin, which is a hormone that is secreted by the pancreas, facilitates the absorption of glucose by the cells and tissues of the body. Glucose is also stored by the liver or muscle cells as glycogen. It is normal for the sugar level to fluctuate throughout the day. Glucose levels are the lowest in the mornings, and mostly tend to rise for a couple of hours after meals, depending on the volume of carbohydrates consumed. The normal range of the blood sugar in the morning is about 70 to 100 mg/dL. Our body has an excellent mechanism to regulate blood sugar levels. Glucose that is stored in the liver as glycogen, gets reabsorbed in the bloodstream, when the sugar levels drop. Normally, the blood sugar levels are tested on an empty stomach, usually after a gap of six to eight hours after having the last meal. This test is known as the fasting blood glucose test. The following chart provides the normal range for fasting blood sugar levels. The following table provides the average blood sugar levels of a normal healthy adult, 2 hours after eating a meal. Note: As per the American Diabetes Association, for people with type 2 diabetes, the normal fasting blood sugar range is 70-130 mg/dL, whereas blood sugar levels after meals should be le Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is a condition in which a woman without diabetes develops high blood sugar levels during pregnancy.[2] Gestational diabetes generally results in few symptoms;[2] however, it does increase the risk of pre-eclampsia, depression, and requiring a Caesarean section.[2] Babies born to mothers with poorly treated gestational diabetes are at increased risk of being too large, having low blood sugar after birth, and jaundice.[2] If untreated, it can also result in a stillbirth.[2] Long term, children are at higher risk of being overweight and developing type 2 diabetes.[2] Gestational diabetes is caused by not enough insulin in the setting of insulin resistance.[2] Risk factors include being overweight, previously having gestational diabetes, a family history of type 2 diabetes, and having polycystic ovarian syndrome.[2] Diagnosis is by blood tests.[2] For those at normal risk screening is recommended between 24 and 28 weeks gestation.[2][3] For those at high risk testing may occur at the first prenatal visit.[2] Prevention is by maintaining a healthy weight and exercising before pregnancy.[2] Gestational diabetes is a treated with a diabetic diet, exercise, and possibly insulin injections.[2] Most women are able to manage their blood sugar with a diet and exercise.[3] Blood sugar testing among those who are affected is often recommended four times a day.[3] Breastfeeding is recommended as soon as possible after birth.[2] Gestational diabetes affects 3–9% of pregnancies, depending on the population studied.[3] It is especially common during the last three months of pregnancy.[2] It affects 1% of those under the age of 20 and 13% of those over the age of 44.[3] A number of ethnic groups including Asians, American Indians, Indigenous Australians, and Pacific Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - Risks, Causes, Prevention!

Gestational Diabetes - Risks, Causes, Prevention!

Gestational Diabetes What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational Diabetes is diabetes that is found for the first time when a woman is pregnant. The expecting mother develops large amount of sugar in her blood which generally resolves itself after baby's birth - unlike other types of diabetes which are lifelong conditions. How does Gestational Diabetes develop? Gestational diabetes develops when the body cannot produce enough insulin - a substance produced by pancreas which regulates the amount of sugar available in the blood for energy and enables any sugar that isn't immediately required to be stored. The pregnant women has to produce extra insulin to meet baby's needs, if her body can't manage this, she may develop gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels may also rise because the hormonal changes of pregnancy interfere with insulin function. Gestational diabetes usually develops during the last half of pregnancy. Risk Factors • Women who are obese. • Women with high blood pressure • Women listed positive for sugar in urine during antenatal checkup. • Women who are above 25yrs of age. • Women with family history of type 2 diabetes. How is Gestational Diabetes Treated? Gestational Diabetes can be treated by keeping blood glucose level in a target range. Proper diet, physical activity and insulin if required plays important role in maintaining blood glucose levels. • Dietary Tips 1. Have small frequent meals i.e. six small meals in a day. 2. Limit sweets. 3. Include more and more fiber in your diet in form of fruits, vegetables, whole grain bread and cereals. 4. Carbohydrates should be 40%-45% of the total calories with breakfast and a bedtime snack containing 15-30 grams of carbohydrates. 5. Drink 8-10 glasses of liquids/day. 6. Avoid Trans fats, fried foods Continue reading >>

Healthy Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women

Healthy Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women

Diabetes that begins during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. This condition affects 5 to 9 percent of all pregnancies in the United States, and it is becoming more common, according to a July 2009 article in "American Family Physician." Pregnancy also aggravates preexisting type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Blood sugar levels that are consistently too high during pregnancy can cause problems for both mother and infant. Video of the Day Diabetes during pregnancy increases the likelihood of congenital malformations, or birth defects, in infants, particularly if your blood glucose is poorly controlled for the first 10 weeks of pregnancy. High blood sugars also contribute to excessive fetal growth, which makes labor and delivery difficult and increases the likelihood of infant fractures or nerve injuries. Large infants are more likely to be delivered via cesarean section. Newborns of diabetic mothers are at risk for respiratory distress, jaundice and dangerously low blood calcium or glucose levels. Gestational diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugars exceed specified levels following two glucose tolerance tests. The first test, usually performed between the 24th and 28th week of your pregnancy, involves drinking 50 g of a sugar solution and checking your blood glucose one hour later. If your level is above 130 mg/dL, your doctor will probably order a second glucose tolerance test that measures your blood glucose when you are fasting and then each hour for 2 to 3 hours after the test. A fasting glucose higher than 95 mg/dL, a one-hour level above 180 mg/dL, a two-hour level over 155 mg/dL or a three-hour measurement over 140 mg/dL is diagnostic of gestational diabetes. For pregnant women without diabetes, average fasting glucose levels vary between 69 mg/dL and 75 mg/ Continue reading >>

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

In the next two articles we’re going to discuss the concept of “normal” blood sugar. I say concept and put normal in quotation marks because what passes for normal in mainstream medicine turns out to be anything but normal if optimal health and function are what you’re interested in. Here’s the thing. We’ve confused normal with common. Just because something is common, doesn’t mean it’s normal. It’s now becoming common for kids to be overweight and diabetic because they eat nothing but refined flour, high-fructose corn syrup and industrial seed oils. Yet I don’t think anyone (even the ADA) would argue that being fat and metabolically deranged is even remotely close to normal for kids. Or adults, for that matter. In the same way, the guidelines the so-called authorities like the ADA have set for normal blood sugar may be common, but they’re certainly not normal. Unless you think it’s normal for people to develop diabetic complications like neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular disease as they age, and spend the last several years of their lives in hospitals or assisted living facilities. Common, but not normal. In this article I’m going to introduce the three markers we use to measure blood sugar, and tell you what the conventional model thinks is normal for those markers. In the next article, I’m going to show you what the research says is normal for healthy people. And I’m also going to show you that so-called normal blood sugar, as dictated by the ADA, can double your risk of heart disease and lead to all kinds of complications down the road. The 3 ways blood sugar is measured Fasting blood glucose This is still the most common marker used in clinical settings, and is often the only one that gets tested. The fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes (diabetes During Pregnancy)

Gestational Diabetes (diabetes During Pregnancy)

Definition of Diabetes During Pregnancy: Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that starts during pregnancy. When the pregnant woman has diabetes, her body is not able to consume the sugar (glucose) in her blood as well as it should. So the level of glucose in the blood becomes above normal. Gestational diabetes occurs in 4% of pregnant women. It is usually diagnosed in the fifth or sixth month of pregnancy (Between the 24th and 28th weeks). Generally, Females are cured from gestational diabetes after delivery. Causes of gestational diabetes: Almost all women have some degree of impaired glucose intolerance during pregnancy due to the hormonal changes that occur during pregnancy. In this case, the level of glucose in the blood may be higher than normal, but not high enough to cause diabetes. During the last phase of the pregnancy (the third trimester), these hormonal changes place pregnant women at risk for gestational diabetes. During pregnancy, increased levels of certain hormones made in the placenta (the organ that connects the baby by the umbilical cord to the uterus) help shifting nutrients from the mother to the growing fetus. The placenta produces hormones to prevent developing low blood sugar. They stop the actions of insulin. Over the course of the pregnancy, these hormones produce impaired glucose intolerance, which increase the level of glucose in the blood. In order to decrease this level, the body makes more insulin to shuttle glucose into cells. Usually the mother's pancreas can produce more insulin (about three times the normal amount) to overcome the effect of the pregnancy hormones on glucose levels. When the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to do it, the glucose levels will raise and cause gestational diabetes. Risk factors for Diabetes Dur Continue reading >>

Glucose Test Reading - Pregnancy-info

Glucose Test Reading - Pregnancy-info

I just talked to my doctor who said I failed my glucose test....it was a reading of 150. Can anyone tell me what their's was? I go in for my 3 hour test on Monday and I am nervous that I have Gestational Diabetes.....any insight??? Thanks, I appreciate any comments. I hope someone answers you. I just had my test this morining and I'm scared I failed also (been having a sweet tooth). Good luck with your 3 hour test. I failed my one hour test too, a lot worse than you did, with a score of 170, but I pa__sed the three-hour. I only had one abnormal reading on the three hour and you need two. Although I did have one that was only about 5 points under the cutoff for being abnormal. Doctor said not to worry about it though. I may just have a slight inclination towards gestational diabetes but nothing to be concerned about. My abnormal reading on the three-hour wasn't dramatically high either. It was only about 8 points over the cutoff. Don't worry. Lots of people pa__s the three hour after failing the first screening. And your score wasn't very high. Good luck. Just a warning though, the three-hour test made me feel really sick for the first hour of it. Then it got much better. I asked my doctor what my result was, he said it was 89. I'm not sure what that means but he said I pa__sed. I hope you pa__s your 3 hour test. Good luck! my glucose test reading for the 1 hour test was 80. anything over 130 is abnormal. im not sure if that tells you anything.... When I did the 1 hour test, drank bottle of orange flavored stuff...they said they wanted you to test in the range of 65 - 134. I tested at 122 and they said for now I was okay. I will do a follow-up test due to baby already being large and family med history. congrats shan_mommy....that is great! I hope my outcome is like tha Continue reading >>

What To Expect With Gestational Diabetes

What To Expect With Gestational Diabetes

Blood glucose control is key to having a healthy baby A diagnosis of gestational diabetes can cast a shadow over the joys of pregnancy. While the vast majority of these cases end with a healthy baby and mom, gestational diabetes (high blood glucose during pregnancy in a woman who has never had type 1 or type 2 diabetes) does increase risks to the health of both baby and mother. Keeping blood glucose under control is crucial for women with gestational diabetes to help safeguard their babies and themselves. Gestational diabetes is caused by issues that arise as part of a normal pregnancy: hormonal changes and weight gain. Women whose bodies can't compensate for these changes by producing enough of the hormone insulin, which ushers glucose from the blood into cells to produce energy, develop high blood glucose and gestational diabetes. Overweight mothers are at a greater risk for the condition. In the United States, gestational diabetes is reported in somewhere between 2 and 10 percent of pregnancies, but it is now believed that the condition affects 18 percent of women in pregnancy. The larger number is the result of new criteria for diagnosis, not just skyrocketing rates. The American Diabetes Association began recommending this year that gestational diabetes be diagnosed with only one abnormal test result rather than two, the previous method, and this is causing more cases to be detected. Gestational diabetes usually appears roughly halfway through pregnancy, as the placenta puts out large amounts of "anti-insulin" hormones. Women without known diabetes should be screened for gestational diabetes 24 to 28 weeks into their pregnancies. (If high blood glucose levels are detected earlier in pregnancy, the mother-to-be may actually have type 2 diabetes, rather than gestati Continue reading >>

Pregnancy And 134 Glucose Test Result - Doctor Answers On Healthcaremagic

Pregnancy And 134 Glucose Test Result - Doctor Answers On Healthcaremagic

Glucose Tolerance Test = 134 during pregnancy of week 23 is normal or abnormal? what are the problems behind this ... What do these blood glucose levels indicate? or pre diabetic. I have taken a few glucose tests. 1. Lunch yesterday: 1 hour after eating. I had a level of 110 2 this morning fasting level was 101 3 lunch. One hour after eating, i took the test twice ... How to control high glucose level in pregnancy? new consultant asked for a delayed anomaly scan and a non fasting 75 gm glucose test. the result ...hi I am 28 weeks pregnantI have done a fasting GTT with 75 gms glucose test in the 25 th week of my ... My wife s glucose tolerance test results are as follows: FS:95; after 1 hour:76; after 2 hours:121 ... pregnancy. During her 5th month glocuse test after 50 gms of glucose her reading was 88(glucose tolerance ... What does glucose screening test of 147 suggest? Hi im 27 weeks pregnant and had a 1 hour glucose screening test last week and got the result ... asian i do eat a lot of white rice, you think that s causing my glucose elevated? Im 39 and this is my 3 ... showing up that shouldn t be there but I can t get back to my doctor for more testing until the end of June. On the bloodwork paper results she gave me I noticed my glucose level is 64 & I seem to have some ... glucose tolerance test (75gm) result : blood sugar (f) : 70 mg/dl blood sugar (pp I) : 144 Blood sugar (pp ... : absent as well as , i am o positiv e & my husband is o negative , done indirect coombs test & result ... hy..I'm 25 weeks of pregnancy,I'm checked for urine feme and the result show glucose 17mmol/l +3..it is may be I have gestational diabetes.? It seems to be related. However I would order for oral blood glucose tolerance test as well as Hba1c level to confirm it. In continuation, Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugars In Pregnancy

Normal Blood Sugars In Pregnancy

I have until now avoided discussing the issue of what normal blood sugars should be in pregnancy because it looked like gynecologists were being more aggressive with blood sugar control during pregnancy then other doctors. Blood sugar control is particularly important in pregnancy because a fetus that is exposed to continually high blood sugars will experience significant changes in the way that its genes express which will affect its blood sugar metabolism for the rest of its life. High blood sugar will also make babies very large, which poses problems when it is time for delivery, some life-threatening. Blood sugars are lower in pregnant women because there is a higher blood volume during pregnancy, but it is starting to look like the targets gynecologists have been recommending, which would have been excellent for non-diabetic women are considerably higher than normal. This was made clear by a new meta-study that analyzed a series of studies of the blood sugars of a wide range of normal pregnant women using Continuous Glucose Monitoring, home testing, and hospital lab results. It makes it clear that the current targets for pregnancy are probably too high. Here is the full text version of the meta-study: Patterns of Glycemia in Normal Pregnancy: Should the current therapeutic targets be challenged? Teri L. Hernandez, et al. Diabetes Care July 2011 vol. 34 no. 7 1660-1668. It concludes that the following appear to be truly normal blood sugars for pregnant women: AVERAGE BLOOD SUGARS IN NORMAL PREGNANT WOMEN Fasting: 70.9 ± 7.8 mg/dl (3.94 mmol/L ± .43) One Hour Post Meal: 108.9 ± 12.9 mg/dl (6.05 ± .72 mmol/L) Two Hours Post Meal: 99.3 ±10.2 mg/dl (5.52 ± .57 mmol/L ) A commentary published in this month's Diabetes Care gives more insight into the importance of t Continue reading >>

Early-pregnancy Glucose Screening For Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

Early-pregnancy Glucose Screening For Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

Early-pregnancy glucose screening for gestational diabetes mellitus. (1)Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA. [email protected] OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy of the 50-g, one-hour glucose screening testadministered at 16 weeks of pregnancy for identifying women with gestationaldiabetes mellitus.STUDY DESIGN: Two hundred fifty-five women underwent 50-g, one-hour glucosescreening tests at 16 weeks of pregnancy. Those with results > or = 135 mg/dLunderwent 100-g, three-hour glucose tolerance tests. All patients withoutdiagnoses of gestational diabetes during the second trimester of pregnancyunderwent standard third-trimester glucose testing.RESULTS: Gestational diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in 25 patients. Glucosescreening tests administered at 16 weeks of pregnancy identified 96% (24) ofthese patients. Patients with 16-week glucose screening test results > or = 135mg/dL had a 55% risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy, while the risk was 0.6% for patients with 16-week test results < or = 110 mg/dL. Patients with16-week glucose screening test results in the intermediate range, 111-134 mg/dL, had a 4.8% risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy.CONCLUSION: Glucose screening at 16 weeks of pregnancy is a useful alternative tothird-trimester screening for gestational diabetes. The negative predictive valueof screening test results < or = 110 mg/dL is 99.4%. The positive predictivevalue for screening test results > or = 135 mg/dL is 55%. This latter finding is superior to the 8.6-22% found during the third-trimester. Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugar Range For Gestational Diabetes - Medhelp

Normal Blood Sugar Range For Gestational Diabetes - Medhelp

Normal blood sugar range for gestational diabetes Common Questions and Answers about Normal blood sugar range for gestational diabetes She will be put on a diet (not particularly a calorie-restricted diet, but one with a limited amount of sugar/carbohydrates) for the duration of the pregnancy. She will have her blood sugar checked fairly frequently, and if they are consistently abnormal while on the diet she may be given insulin and taught to monitor her sugars at home.The goal is to regulate her blood sugars into a normal range in order to optimize the health of the baby and herself. Uncontrolled gest. Sooo apparently I failed my 3 hour fasting test for gestational diabetes. However I have been checking my blood sugar for the past couple days twice a day and my sugar has not been high at all. Pretty good actually. I eat the right things and exercise and I hardly touch things that's really high in sugar. I wonder if this is just a glitch ? They want me to take this class and buy this glucometer and test strips thats over 100 dollars but I honestly dnt think I need them. I currently have GD, I check my blood levels four times a day and am able to control it with diet. Just be careful with added sugar items, my blood sugar wasn't that much out of range when I was tested so I haven't had to do any insulin. What happens is your body slows down metabolism during pregnancy to ensure that your growing baby gets enough nutrients. This causes your pancreas to produce more insulin to keep your blood sugar levels within a normal range . With gestational diabetes, your body doesn't produce the extra insulin causing your blood sugar levels to rise. Left uncontrolled this can result in too much weight for you and baby. ) I, essentially, failed the three hour Glucose Tolerance Test b Continue reading >>

Glucose Test During Pregnancy For Gestational Diabetes

Glucose Test During Pregnancy For Gestational Diabetes

Congratulations! A baby is on the way. Your nine months will be filled with preparations, from decorating the nursery to stocking up on bibs and booties to going for regular checkups to ensure that you and your baby are as healthy as possible. One of the tests that you’ll have during this time is to check for gestational diabetes. A few weeks ago, we looked at Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes, which is growing more common among pregnant women, will be our focus this week. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes, or GDM for short, is diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. In fact, it only occurs during pregnancy. (Gestational diabetes is not the same as diabetes in women who have existing diabetes and become pregnant). Diabetes, as most of you know, is a condition in which blood glucose levels go too high. High blood glucose levels can be harmful to you and, in the case of pregnancy, to your unborn child. Fortunately, blood glucose, or sugar, levels can be controlled during pregnancy, and in most instances, high blood sugar levels return to normal after the baby is delivered. According to the National Institutes of Health, up to 10% of pregnant women in the United States have gestational diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? A lot of changes occur in the body during pregnancy, many of them occurring due to widely fluctuating hormone levels. The placenta, which is what connects the baby to the mother’s uterine lining, makes various hormones, and while this is a good thing, these hormones can sometimes make it hard for the body’s insulin to work properly (a condition called insulin resistance). As a result, blood sugar levels can start to climb in women who cannot produce enough insulin to deal with the insulin resistance. How do you Continue reading >>

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