diabetestalk.net

128 Blood Sugar After Eating

When To Test Blood Sugar After Meals

When To Test Blood Sugar After Meals

For some reason the past week brought me a bunch of emails all asking the same question: Are we supposed to test our blood sugar one hour after we start or end a meal? As is true with everything involving diabetes the answer is not simple due to variations in individual blood sugar responses. The reason we test one hour after a meals is to learn how high our blood sugar goes in response to the specific meal. So we want to be testing at the moment when our blood sugar is at its peak. Studies tell us something about the average time it takes for the carbohydrate in our food to turn into blood sugar (carbohydrates are the main nutrient that causes elevated blood sugars). Such studies suggest that most Americans who eat our meals fairly quickly will see a peak somewhere between one hour and seventy-five minutes after we start eating. But because studies only come up with averages, they don't take into account individual variations--and you are, of course, an individual. And when we move from group averages to individual response we learn that when the blood sugar peak occurs depends on a multitude of factors that include how fast we eat our meals, how much we eat at each meal, how tightly bound the glucose is in the carbohydrates we eat, and how efficient our digestive system is at digesting the carbohydrate bound in our food. That explains why the same meal consumed at the same time by two different people may peak at different times--and why I can't tell you exactly when to test. That's why you might try varying the time at which you test a carefully chosen test meal to see if your personal peak is later than average. Choose a simple meal that contains a known quantity of carbohydrate--a single measured portion of something rather than a meal where you have to guess what Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

Thank you for visiting my website! If you need help lowering your blood sugar level, check out my books at Amazon or Smashwords. If you’re outside of the U.S., Smashwords may be the best source. —Steve Parker, M.D. * * * Physicians focus so much on disease that we sometimes lose sight of what’s healthy and normal. For instance, the American Diabetes Association defines “tight” control of diabetes to include sugar levels as high as 179 mg/dl (9.94 mmol/l) when measured two hours after a meal. In contrast, young adults without diabetes two hours after a meal are usually in the range of 90 to 110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l). What Is a Normal Blood Sugar Level? The following numbers refer to average blood sugar (glucose) levels in venous plasma, as measured in a lab. Portable home glucose meters measure sugar in capillary whole blood. Many, but not all, meters in 2010 are calibrated to compare directly to venous plasma levels. Fasting blood sugar after a night of sleep and before breakfast: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) One hour after a meal: 110 mg/dl (6.11 mmol/l) Two hours after a meal: 95 mg/dl (5.28 mmol/l) Five hours after a meal: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) (The aforementioned meal derives 50–55% of its energy from carbohydrate) ♦ ♦ ♦ Ranges of blood sugar for young healthy non-diabetic adults: Fasting blood sugar: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) One hour after a typical meal: 90–125 mg/dl (5.00–6.94 mmol/l) Two hours after a typical meal: 90–110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l) Five hours after a typical meal: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) Blood sugars tend to be a bit lower in pregnant women. ♦ ♦ ♦ What Level of Blood Sugar Defines Diabetes and Prediabetes? According to the 2007 guidelines issued by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinol Continue reading >>

Want To Know If Your Diet Is Healthy? Track Your Blood Sugar.

Want To Know If Your Diet Is Healthy? Track Your Blood Sugar.

Are you confused if what you are eating is healthy? Are whole grains good for us? Do we need to be gluten free? Should we be eating dairy regularly? What about fruit? Nuts? Beans? Ahhhhhhhh! Let’s face it, there is A LOT of conflicting diet information out there. Where do you even start? Well it all comes down to one very basic thing…your blood sugar. It doesn’t have to be complicated. It doesn’t have to take weeks of diet diaries and calorie counting. Nor does it require reading endless books, websites, studies, and journals to get the most up-to-date nutrition advice. It is really quite simple, and it can be tested. Wouldn’t it be great to know when you eat something how the inside of your body responds? Does it give you the green light or the red light? Well, you can learn this with a very inexpensive piece of equipment that you can find at any drug store or pharmacy called a glucose meter or glucometer. Click here for a video tutorial on how to test your blood sugar. ……. So, ask your body what it thinks of the food you are eating by taking your blood sugar. Here is a quick & very basic break down on how your blood sugar works. Step 1: You eat a food Step 2: It gets broken down into two categories: stuff the body will use and stuff that will become waste Step 3: Glucose, aka blood sugar, is one of the essential breakdown products of food that the body and brain use for fuel Step 4: Depending on the types of food you just ate, your blood sugar rises. If you just ate a meal high in starch and sugar, your blood sugar rises high over a normal fasting level. If you just had a meal of healthy fats and proteins, your blood sugar does not rise as high. ……. Having a normal functioning blood sugar is the key to optimal health and the prevention of chronic dis Continue reading >>

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Who Gets Diabetes and How to Manage It Diabetes is a metabolic disease that can lead to serious health complications if left untreated. Several factors, such as body weight, family history and race and ethnicity may increase your risk of diabetes. Diabetes can be effectively managed by exercising and eating a healthy diet. What is diabetes? Diabetes (medically known as diabetes mellitus) is a common, chronic disorder marked by elevated levels of blood glucose, or sugar. It occurs when your cells don’t respond appropriately to insulin (a hormone secreted by the pancreas), and when your pancreas can’t produce more insulin in response. Diabetes usually can’t be cured. Left untreated—or poorly managed—it can lead to serious long-term complications, including kidney failure, amputation, and blindness. Moreover, having diabetes increases your risk for cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. Your body and sugar To understand diabetes, it’s helpful to understand the basics of how your body metabolizes (breaks down) sugar. Most of the cells in your body need sugar as a source of energy. When you eat carbohydrates, such as a bowl of pasta or some vegetables, your digestive system breaks the carbohydrates down into simple sugars such as glucose, which travel into and through your bloodstream to nourish and energize cells. A key player in the breakdown of sugar is the pancreas, a fish-shaped gland behind your stomach and liver. The pancreas fills two roles. It produces enzymes that flow into the small intestine to help break down the nutrients in your food—proteins, carbohydrates, and fats—to provide sources of energy and building material for the body’s cells. It makes hormones that regulate the disposal of nutrients, including sugars. Cells in Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugar Range After Meals

Normal Blood Sugar Range After Meals

Monitoring is the only way to tell if your blood sugar is consistently staying with in range. Even non-diabetics should check their blood sugar every once in awhile to catch the potential development of the disease early. For non-diabetics, checking post-meal blood sugars is a good way to keep an eye on the potential developing disease. For diabetics, keeping an eye on after meal blood sugars is critical for to make sure the correct amount of insulin is being administered with meals. Video of the Day Blood sugar describes the molecule glucose that circulates in the blood. Glucose is the energy source that we get from the food you eat, specifically carbohydrates, and required by the body’s tissues to perform all of its basic functions. Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas that allows cells to take in glucose from the blood to use as energy. The tissue cells do not take in all of the sugar in the blood though; there is a specific amount that bodies like to keep in the bloodstream, according to the Blood Sugar Diabetic website. How Food Affects Blood Sugar When you eat, digestion breaks down food into smaller molecules to be absorbed into your tissues. Even before you take your first bite, your pancreas produces insulin in preparation for increased blood sugar and therefore energy absorption into cells. Carbohydrates are the main source for glucose, but protein can increase blood sugar, as well. But not all carbohydrates are created equal. Simple carbohydrates such as white bread, fruit, milk, and candy raise blood sugar more quickly than complex carbohydrates such as whole grains, vegetables, and beans. A non diabetic’s blood sugar level should be between 70 and 140 mg/dL one to two hours after a meal, according to the American Diabetes Association. If it is Continue reading >>

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

In the next two articles we’re going to discuss the concept of “normal” blood sugar. I say concept and put normal in quotation marks because what passes for normal in mainstream medicine turns out to be anything but normal if optimal health and function are what you’re interested in. Here’s the thing. We’ve confused normal with common. Just because something is common, doesn’t mean it’s normal. It’s now becoming common for kids to be overweight and diabetic because they eat nothing but refined flour, high-fructose corn syrup and industrial seed oils. Yet I don’t think anyone (even the ADA) would argue that being fat and metabolically deranged is even remotely close to normal for kids. Or adults, for that matter. In the same way, the guidelines the so-called authorities like the ADA have set for normal blood sugar may be common, but they’re certainly not normal. Unless you think it’s normal for people to develop diabetic complications like neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular disease as they age, and spend the last several years of their lives in hospitals or assisted living facilities. Common, but not normal. In this article I’m going to introduce the three markers we use to measure blood sugar, and tell you what the conventional model thinks is normal for those markers. In the next article, I’m going to show you what the research says is normal for healthy people. And I’m also going to show you that so-called normal blood sugar, as dictated by the ADA, can double your risk of heart disease and lead to all kinds of complications down the road. The 3 ways blood sugar is measured Fasting blood glucose This is still the most common marker used in clinical settings, and is often the only one that gets tested. The fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Print Overview Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels and kidneys — may already be starting. There's good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn't inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children's blood sugar levels back to normal. Symptoms Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you've moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Blurred vision When to see a doctor See your doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any type 2 diabetes signs or symptoms. Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for prediabetes. Causes The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat — especially abdominal fat — also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don't process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead o Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 128 Mg/dl (7.1mmol/l) After Eating - Is That Good Or Bad?

Blood Sugar 128 Mg/dl (7.1mmol/l) After Eating - Is That Good Or Bad?

We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar after eating and the result was 128 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: Your result is: Normal blood sugar Your blood sugar level (up to 2 hours) after eating should always be below 140mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the body’s inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: • Age 50 and under: Less than 140 mg/dl • Age 50 – 60: Less than 150 mg/dl • Over age 60: Less than 160 mg/dl A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individual’s particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a person’s postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. • Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. • Extreme stress: Stress produces the body’s fight-or-flight response triggering the release of stress hormones such as cortisol. These hormones cause the body to release the glu Continue reading >>

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Here you'll find info about why blood sugar is high in the morning, along with tips and resources to lower those numbers! A while back I had a client sending me her blood sugar charts every few days and on those charts she always made some notes if she had questions. Every time she sent them through, I noticed she had 3 big question marks (???) against her morning blood sugar results. And on another morning when her morning blood sugar levels were high at 160 mg/dl (or 8.9 mmol/l). She had written: I don't understand. 97 mg/dl (or 5.5mmol/l) last night when I went to sleep. I didn't eat anything because I didn't feel well. Humm… I was also over in one of the online diabetes groups I'm involved in today and this message popped up. I'm struggling with my morning BS number. When I went to bed around 11PM my BS was 107. I'm waking up with my BS between 120 – 135. I did put two pieces of string cheese next to my bed and when I woke up around 3am, I ate one. Since I was told to eat protein at night. When I woke up 3 hours later my BS was 130. I didn't want to eat anything large since it's so close to 140 (my goal is to keep it below 140). So I had 1 piece of toast (sugar free wheat bread) and just a tiny bit of peanut butter. I checked it an hour later and it was 161! What am I doing wrong? Do these morning situations sound familiar to you? Are you constantly questioning: Why is blood sugar high in the morning? I mean, logically we'd think that it should be at it's lowest in the morning right? Well don't panic, there is a reason for it, so let's explore why morning blood sugar is often higher. And at the end, I'll also point you toward some resources to help you lower those levels. Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning? Although it would seem logical that your body would Continue reading >>

New Research On High Glucose Levels

New Research On High Glucose Levels

American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines advise “lowering A1C to below or around 7%” and postprandial (after-meal) glucose levels to 180 mg/dl or below. But new research shows that these glucose levels damage blood vessels, nerves, organs, and beta cells. An article by diabetes blogger Jenny Ruhl analyzes at what blood glucose level organ damage starts. According to Ruhl, research shows that glucose can do harm at much lower levels than doctors had thought. This news could be discouraging or even terrifying. If it’s hard to meet your current glucose goals, how will you reach tighter goals? Such news might make some people give up. But remember, a high postprandial or fasting reading won’t kill you. All we know is that higher numbers correlate with higher chances of complications. You have time to react. In fact, we could choose to look at this as good news. We all know of people who developed complications despite “good control.” But complications are not inevitable; it’s just that so-called “good control” wasn’t really all that good. First, the numbers. “Post-meal blood sugars of 140 mg/dl [milligrams per deciliter] and higher, and fasting blood sugars over 100 mg/dl [can] cause permanent organ damage and cause diabetes to progress,” Ruhl writes. For nerve damage, University of Utah researchers studied people with painful sensory neuropathy, or nerve damage. They found that participants who did not have diabetes but who had impaired glucose tolerance on an oral glucose tolerance test, or OGTT, (meaning that their glucose levels rose to between 140 mg/dl and 200 mg/dl in response to drinking a glucose-rich drink) were much more likely to have a diabetic form of neuropathy than those with lower blood glucose levels. The higher these OGTT num Continue reading >>

My Fasting Blood Glucose Level Is 128 Mg/dl What Should I Do

My Fasting Blood Glucose Level Is 128 Mg/dl What Should I Do

Question Originally asked by Community Member mary waters My Fasting Blood Glucose Level Is 128 Mg/dl What Should I Do just 3 months ago it was 77 Answer Mary- Hello! I am a Diabetic also and my fasting blood sugar levels had always been in the 80-90 range, until one day I started having 110-145. I talked to my Endo and a few friends, I was experiencing the Dawn Phenomenon. Dawn phenomenon refers to an increase in basal insulin needs in the early morning hours. It is caused by the increased production of certain hormones (growth hormone, cortisol) during this time. might want to read David Mendoza’s taming the Dawn Phenomenon (click the highlighted). It’s can be a little frustrating at times but you can get it under control. Good Luck Cherise Community Moderator You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Answered By: Cherise Nicole Continue reading >>

A High Sugar Level After A Meal

A High Sugar Level After A Meal

It's normal for your blood sugar level to rise after you eat, especially if you eat a meal high in refined carbohydrates. But if your blood sugar rises more than most people's, you might have diabetes or pre-diabetes, a condition that indicates a strong risk for developing diabetes in the future. If you already have diabetes, you doctor will recommend keeping your blood sugar within a prescribed range. A glucose tolerance test, done one to three hours after you eat a high-carbohydrate meal, can check your blood sugar levels. Why Does Your Blood Sugar Rise? When you eat carbohydrates, your body breaks down the sugars they contain into glucose. Your body can't absorb most sugars without breaking them down first. Simple sugars such as refined sugar break down very quickly; you absorb them rapidly into your bloodstream, which raises your blood sugar. In healthy people, the levels don't rise very high and they drop back to normal quickly. If you have diabetes, your levels after a meal will rise higher and stay high longer than levels in other people. This occurs because your pancreas either don't release enough insulin, the hormone that helps cells absorb glucose, or because the cells don't respond properly to insulin release. Normal Levels If your doctor suspects that you have abnormal glucose levels, he might suggest doing a glucose tolerance test. You are given around 75 grams of carbohydrate after fasting for 12 hours. At one- to three-hour intervals, your doctor draws blood and analyzes your glucose levels. A normal fasting glucose is 60 to 100 milligrams per deciliter; your levels should rise no higher than 200 mg/dl one hour after eating and no more than 140 mg/dl two hours after finishing the snack. Most healthy people without diabetes have two-hour readings below 12 Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar - Diabetes Prevention & Pre-diabetes - Medhelp

Blood Sugar - Diabetes Prevention & Pre-diabetes - Medhelp

so your fasting blood sugar was 128!This is alreadyhigh enough to qualify as diabetes if the number were seen again on another fasting result. I don't think your test is wrong (though it could be affected by your previous day's diet), and in any case it is far higher than it should be (Normal fasting is in the low 80s, with acceptable level being < 95).128 is far higher than acceptable level. I am not very happy that your doctor has recommended diet and exercise alone, without doing any further testing. The reason is that a fasting number doesn't give a full picture of what is happening.You may have a high fasting number, but normal numbers the rest of the day.In this case you have something called dawn phenomenon and probably a low dose of a medication such as metformin would be helpful. However,you may have high fasting blood sugars and even higher numbers the rest of the day.This case is much more serious. Your doctor should test your HbA1c. This test gives an average blood sugar over the past approximately 3 months.Normal HBA1C is 4.3 - 4.6, with < 5.0 still being acceptable.If your HBA1C is 6 - 7 your blood sugars are too high.If it is above 7 you will be officially diagnosed as diabetic. Diet, exercise and weight loss are all a critical part of management of diabetes. I would also recommend you ask for a prescription for meter and test strips so you cna conduct some of your own testing.Testing times should be fasting and then 2 hours after eating.By doing this you will also learn which foods make your blood sugars high (and you can then avoid them).if your blood sugars stay high even with lifestyle measures then medications (oral such as metformin, or injected insulin if your sugars were very high) would be recommended. Please read up on diabetes and it's managem Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Diabetes Blood Sugar Level 128, 347

Weight Loss Diabetes Blood Sugar Level 128, 347

May weight loss in diabetes occur? - sugar level 105 to 128 It is obvious that in April your blood glucose level was quite high - up to 565 mg/dl as you said; while the normal blood glucose level ranges 64.8 to 104.4mg/dl. But now, thanks to the good control of yours, it is almost within the normal ranges. However, there are several other things, which you can do in purpose to reduce your blood glucose level even more, and lose weight too. According to the blood glucose results, which you have provided, I can conclude that you have been diagnosed with diabetes several months ago. Because of this fact, it would be even easier for you to lose weight. There are three very simple, buy hard steps, which you have to follow to succeed, including diet, herbs and doing exercises. 1. I supposed that your doctor have already informed you about the diet that you have to follow. However, now Im going to give you some basic directions, because the diet is the most important element in the weight losing process. - First of all, you have to reduce the amount of carbs acquired per day. - Try to eat 5-6 times a day, but small portions. This way of eating will ensure your body constant intake of nutrients, which will be used in proper way. 2. Usage of herbs is important for your glucose metabolism, because herbs like gymnema sylvestre, bitter melon and cinnamon have shown to improve the glucose metabolism. The usage of these herbs leads to more adequate usage of the blood glucose. When the glucose is used in a proper way, you will not gain weight, which makes the losing weight process even easier. Important fact is that these herbs are effective only when they are combined with effective treatment. You cant use herbs without drugs unless you are having the desired results, which assume t Continue reading >>

Glucose Level Of 128? | Yahoo Answers

Glucose Level Of 128? | Yahoo Answers

i recently went to a doctor had blood work done a couple hours after a meal and my reading was 128.My doctor called me a few days later told me on the phone i was diabetic prescribed me metformin but didnt tell me to check my sugar levels nor did she give me a glucose meter.is tthe 128 considered high ,and what... show more i recently went to a doctor had blood work done a couple hours after a meal and my reading was 128.My doctor called me a few days later told me on the phone i was diabetic prescribed me metformin but didnt tell me to check my sugar levels nor did she give me a glucose meter.is tthe 128 considered high ,and what do you think of my doctors response?? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: I agree with PaulD. And the others answering here. IIn my opinion your Dr. has over reacted. A reading of 128 two hours after a meal is not that uncommon. Taking Metforin without having testing equipment is definitely not recommended. Go to an online PDR (physicians desk reference) and read the cautions and warnings on this drug. Common name for the drug is Glucophage. here's a reliable link for more info on Diabetes The important thing is to get a more detailed diagnosis and a detailed treatment plan if you are diabetic. Source(s): A type 2 diabetic,for 20 yeard. (type 2 diabetics are also called non insulin dependent) and have controlled the disese with diet, excercise, and acombination of oral medications. Source(s): Two Weeks Diabetes Cure - Source(s): I Cured My Diabetes - While 128 is on the high side of normal, that number alone doesn't really mean very much, especially after only a couple hours. Fasting blood sugar should be taken after 8 hours. Maybe you ate a lot of starches or proteins in your last meal, those take a long time to digest. Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar