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What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

My Family History of Diabetes Diabetes has been in my family for generations. My grandmother was a diabetic, my father is diabetic, and during my pregnancy I almost developed prenatal diabetes. Given my family history and my own personal experience, I've learned a lot about this condition over the years. It turns out that there are many things we can do to control our blood sugar though the foods we eat. Normal Blood Glucose Levels What are normal blood glucose levels? Before meals: 80-90 mg/dL After meals: Up to 120 mg/dL Keep in mind that the blood glucose level before a meal for a non-diabetic and a prediabetic person may be very similar. As you can see in the graph below, how your blood sugar fluctuates after eating a meal can be more telling than your pre-meal glucose levels. However, if your pre-meal glucose level is over 100 mg/dL, you should see a doctor. A fasting glucose level of 126 mg/dL is considered diabetic. In this article, you will learn about the progression of Type 2 diabetes and how you can reverse it. Understanding the Diagnosis If you are reading this, you probably have been told by your doctor that you have, or someone you care about has, diabetes or prediabetes. You may be surprised, shocked, or even scared. You wonder how and why this is happening. Basically, diabetes means that the level of glucose in your blood (or blood sugar) is too high. Everyone has glucose in his or her blood. We need it to provide energy for all the cells in our body. Having diabetes means you have more than you need, way above normal blood sugar levels. The diagnosis of diabetes is somewhat arbitrary and keeps changing over time. Some time ago, your fasting glucose levels had to be 140 mg/dL or higher to be considered diabetic. Today the official number is 126 mg/dL, an Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Average Blood Sugar

Understanding Your Average Blood Sugar

A1c is an average of all your blood sugars. It does not tell you your blood sugar patterns. Use it only as yet another indicator of how well you’re doing. Glysolated Hemoglobin (or A1c) is a measure of your average blood glucose control over the previous three months. Glucose attaches to hemoglobin the oxygen carrying molecule in red blood cells. The glucose-hemoglobin unit is called glycosolated hemoglobin. As red blood cells live an average of three months, the glycosolated hemoglobin reflects the sugar exposure to the cells over that time. The higher the amount of glucose in the blood, the higher the percentage of hemoglobin molecules that will have glucose attached. Think of the A1c as a long-term blood glucose measure that changes very gradually as red blood cells die and are replaced by new cells. The A1c doesn’t replace self blood-glucose monitoring. Because the A1c is an average of all your blood sugars, it does not tell you your blood sugar patterns. For example, one person with frequent highs and lows can have the same A1c as another person with very stable blood sugars that don’t vary too much. So what’s the point? A1c is yet another indicator of how well you’re doing. An A1c measurement between 4-6% is considered the range that someone without diabetes will have. The American Diabetes Association goal is an A1c less than 7%. Research has shown that an A1c less than 7% lowers risk for complications. The American College of Endocrinology goal is an A1c less than 6.5%. For some people with diabetes an A1c goal of less than 6% is appropriate. Talk with your doctor about your A1c goal. Use this chart to view A1c values and comparable blood glucose values: A1c Estimated Average Glucose mg/dL 5% 97 6% 126 7% 154 8% 183 9% 212 10% 240 11% 269 12% 298 A not Continue reading >>

1. Is Your Blood Pressure Higher Than 139/89?

1. Is Your Blood Pressure Higher Than 139/89?

High blood pressure is a blood pressure reading of 140/90 mmHg or higher. Both numbers are important. About one in every three American adults has high blood pressure. Once high blood pressure develops, it usually lasts a lifetime. The good news is that it can be treated and controlled. High blood pressure is called "the silent killer" because it usually has no symptoms. Some people may not find out they have it until permanent damage to their heart, brain or kidneys has occurred. When high blood pressure is not found and treated, it can cause: the heart to get larger, which may lead to heart failure small bulges (aneurysms) to form in blood vessels; common locations are the main artery from the heart (aorta), arteries in the brain, legs and intestines, and the artery leading to the spleen blood vessels in the kidney to narrow, which may cause kidney failure arteries throughout the body to "harden" faster, especially those in the heart, brain, kidneys and legs; this can cause a heart attack, stroke, kidney failure or amputation of part of the leg blood vessels in the eyes to burst or bleed, which may cause vision changes and can result in blindness. What is blood pressure? Blood is carried from the heart to all parts of the body in vessels called arteries. Blood pressure is the force of the blood pushing against the walls of the arteries. Each time the heart beats (about 60-70 times a minute at rest), it pumps out blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is at its highest when the heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When the heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is the diastolic pressure. Blood pressure is always given as these two numbers, the systolic and diastolic pressures. Both are important. Usually they Continue reading >>

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Who Gets Diabetes and How to Manage It Diabetes is a metabolic disease that can lead to serious health complications if left untreated. Several factors, such as body weight, family history and race and ethnicity may increase your risk of diabetes. Diabetes can be effectively managed by exercising and eating a healthy diet. What is diabetes? Diabetes (medically known as diabetes mellitus) is a common, chronic disorder marked by elevated levels of blood glucose, or sugar. It occurs when your cells don’t respond appropriately to insulin (a hormone secreted by the pancreas), and when your pancreas can’t produce more insulin in response. Diabetes usually can’t be cured. Left untreated—or poorly managed—it can lead to serious long-term complications, including kidney failure, amputation, and blindness. Moreover, having diabetes increases your risk for cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. Your body and sugar To understand diabetes, it’s helpful to understand the basics of how your body metabolizes (breaks down) sugar. Most of the cells in your body need sugar as a source of energy. When you eat carbohydrates, such as a bowl of pasta or some vegetables, your digestive system breaks the carbohydrates down into simple sugars such as glucose, which travel into and through your bloodstream to nourish and energize cells. A key player in the breakdown of sugar is the pancreas, a fish-shaped gland behind your stomach and liver. The pancreas fills two roles. It produces enzymes that flow into the small intestine to help break down the nutrients in your food—proteins, carbohydrates, and fats—to provide sources of energy and building material for the body’s cells. It makes hormones that regulate the disposal of nutrients, including sugars. Cells in Continue reading >>

Your Average Blood Sugar: Why It Really Matters

Your Average Blood Sugar: Why It Really Matters

If there was a blood test that could give you valuable information about a major, yet reversible risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and age related dementia, would you want to take it? What if that same blood test could also give you information about your risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, vision loss, cancer and how fast you can expect your body to age? What if the test was really cheap? Now, what if you knew that what you were going to have to do to reverse your risk of all these conditions was going to be personally challenging, maybe even really hard, would you still want to take the test? Something to think about, isn’t it? The test I’m talking about does exist. It’s a simple little test that’s run all the time. It’s full implications are rarely considered, however. The test It’s called “hemoglobin A1c” and is sometimes referred to simply as the “A1c” test. In essence, it measures the amount of sugar that has become stuck to the hemoglobin in your red blood cells (hemoglobin is the component in blood that carries oxygen). Because red blood cells live for about 3 to 4 months, the test is usually used to estimate an “average blood sugar” for the previous 3 months. The more sugar floating around in your blood on a daily basis, the higher you A1c value will be. In conventional medicine the test is used to diagnose and monitor treatment goals for diabetics. The implications of a person’s A1c value run much deeper, however. Sugar within the body doesn’t just stick to hemoglobin. It sticks to many tissues that are made of proteins and fats (this accounts for most tissues in your body by the way) and can bind directly to DNA. The compounds formed by this process are called advanced glycation end products or “AGEs” for Continue reading >>

Exam 1 Solutions €“ Math 263 (sect 9) €“ Prof. Kennedy

Exam 1 Solutions €“ Math 263 (sect 9) €“ Prof. Kennedy

20 32 30 28 100 1. For 219 hospital patients the length of their stay in the hospital (in days) was recorded. A histogram is show above. a. The median is approximately A) 10.0 B ) 3.2 C) 2.0 D) 5.1 b. The mean is approximately c. The IQR (interquartile range) is approximately A) 0.5 B ) 3.1 C) 5.2 D) 19 d. The 80th percentile is approximately A) 3.2 B ) 5.0 C) 7.3 D) 15 2. Assume that blood-glucose levels in a population of adult women are normally distributed with mean 90 mg/dL and standard deviation 38 mg/dL. a. Use the standard normal distribution to determine what percentage of the population has a level above 80 mg/dL Solution: Z=(80-90)/38= -0.263158 From table or calculator, probability below this is 0.39627. So answer is 1-0.39627=0.6037=60.37% b. The 90th percentile for glucose levels is the level such that 90% of the population has a glucose level lower than the 90th percentile. Find the 90th percentile for glucose levels. Solution:From table or calculator the 90th percentile for standard normal distribution is at z=1.2816. So answer is 90 + 1.2816*38 mg/dL =138.7 mg/dL c. Suppose that the “abnormal range†is defined to be glucose levels which are 1.5 standard deviations above the mean or 1.5 standard deviations below the mean. What percentage of individuals would be classified “abnormal?†Solution: This is same as asking what percentage of standard normal distribution is below z=-1.5 or above z=1.5. For standard normal the probability less than -1.5 is 0.0668. By the symmetry of the distribution the probability above 1.5 is the same. So answer is 2*0.0668=13.36%. d. Suppose we want to redefine the abnormal range to be more than c standard deviations above the mean or less than c standard deviations with c chosen so that 4 % of the populati Continue reading >>

Patient Comments: Hemoglobin A1c Test - High Results

Patient Comments: Hemoglobin A1c Test - High Results

I have been doing a lot of research on CIN1. I was 26 when my doctor told me I have cervical dysplasia (CIN1), January of 20017. I didn't think anything of it. But then she told me I have HPV high risk E6/E7 mRNA. One day I was looking through my medical records online and discovered I had CIN1 3 years ago July of 2014 and my doctor never told me. Now I am stressing over it because my periods are irregular and when I do have them they are strange. Also the year of 2014 I told my doctor I was having clots the size of 2 half dollars put together and she didn't say anything either. I get pelvic pain sometimes. She did a biopsy and I was positive for CIN1 and high risk HPV and ascus. I don't know what I should do, maybe I should get a new doctor. In May 2015 I was really tired, lethargic and bloated all the time. I was so constipated and miserable. I had been gluten free for 4 years by self-diagnosis. Finally, I went to a gastroenterologist. My blood work came back positive for Helicobacter pylori. The doctor said that H. pylori causes similar symptoms as gluten allergies. I had an endoscopy and colonoscopy which showed all of the internal inflammation and prior damage from the bacteria. It seemed to be dormant so there was no need for eradication, however the prescription acid reflux pills made me sick so I stopped that. Now I take probiotics and manuka honey and feel great. Try to avoid the prescription drugs. I have to go back for a check up to see if the bacteria is gone. I just had a laparoscopy 2 days ago and other than feeling full and bloated from the gas and a soreness around the incisions, I feel pretty good. The day of the surgery when I came home, I was very sleepy and slept for almost 2 days with getting up, except here and there to use the bathroom and eat. My Continue reading >>

Change In Temperature Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

Change In Temperature Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

Back to Living Better Many diabetics are aware stress and illness can cause blood sugar fluctuations, but did you know changes in temperatures can affect blood sugar levels and lead to false readings? Sabrina Rene, M.D., an endocrinologist at Piedmont, explains how temperature can produce blood sugar highs and lows, and how they can affect diabetes testing supplies. Effects of warm weather on diabetics During warmer months, it is especially important for diabetics to stay properly hydrated. Dehydration can cause blood sugar to rise as the glucose in your blood becomes more concentrated. High temperatures can also cause blood vessels to dilate, which can enhance insulin absorption, potentially leading to low blood sugar. It is best for diabetics to stay indoors during the hottest part of the day and monitor blood sugar closely for changes when temperatures start to rise. Ideal storage temperature for diabetic testing supplies Extreme heat and cold can affect insulin, test strips and glucose monitors. Never leave these supplies in a car, no matter what time of year. The meter should also be stored and used in a room that remains between 50 and 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Dr. Rene says it is important to store test strips in a dry, cool place. “You never want to store test strips in your bathroom. The warm, humid atmosphere can damage the strips, causing them to produce false readings,” she says. Vascular problems and temperature changes Patients with vascular problems often do not have proper blood flow, especially to their extremities, and cold weather may exacerbate slow blood flow. Diabetes test strips need a certain level of oxygen and blood flow to accurately calculate the glucose level. The lower these are, the less accurate the reading, says Dr. Rene. Raynaud’s p Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level After Working Out

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level After Working Out

What is normal blood sugar level after Working out Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. What is normal blood sugar level after Working out So i had thai food today (abt 1 1/2 cup rice and green curry --yumm). and i got home, put baby to bed and worked out for 30 minutes on Tony Little's Gazelle. I was a little shaky right after so i checked my sugar, It was 123, is it normal? I have no idea, do you? if so then please tell me. There was about 1 1/2 hr gap between lunch and working out. (For the record I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes and now i am prediabetic.) 123 you should not feel shaky at all. I like to be below 100 after a workout. I went out today for a 35 mile bike ride. At 1 hour I was at 125 and felt fine. I checked 45 minutes later and was at 85. Finished the ride 15 minutes later and checked 15 minutes after being home and was at 73. I felt fine throughout the whole ride. I am a type 1 and on a pump but that should not make a difference on when you are shaky. 123 is actually a good BG to be at when working out. .... I was a little shaky right after so i checked my sugar, It was 123, is it normal? ... That hypo symptom could also have been caused by a sudden drop in blood glucose. The rate of change is just as important as the absolute blood glucose level, as far as hypo symptoms are concerned. Exercise improves insulin sensitivity and can cause blood glucose to drop very quickly. Especially as you have insulin resistance, and because you had a carby meal 90 minutes earlier. Did you test your blood glucose before the workout? Thanks guyz for comforting replies. I hope everybody is doing great today. BluSky Continue reading >>

A False Sense Of Hypoglycemia

A False Sense Of Hypoglycemia

By Nora Saul, M.S., R.D., C.D.E., Manager of Nutritional Services at Joslin Hypoglycemia is defined as a blood glucose level below 70mg/dl. But many people find that they feel the symptoms of low blood glucose at levels much higher than expected. Some patients have come into my office reporting getting sweaty, hungry and tachycardic at levels in the mid 130s. Symptoms of hypoglycemia are individual, but may include extreme hunger, nervousness, excessive perspiration, rapid heartbeat (tachycardia), headache, fatigue, mood changes, blurred vision and difficulty concentration and completing mental tasks. Extremely low glucose levels can lead to disorientation and convulsions. People who take insulin or some oral medications that cause the pancreas to produce insulin are usually prone to episodes of hypoglycemia. This is especially true if they are attempting to keep their glucose level as close to normal as possible. But, people in poor control can also have hypoglycemic reactions as they swing from high to low glucose levels. False hypoglycemia is usually due to one of two causes. The first can be compared to an incorrectly programmed thermostat. If you usually keep your room at a steamy 85 degrees, 70 degrees might start to feel chilly. People whose blood glucose is often high trick their body into thinking this is normal. If they rapidly bring their blood glucose into the normal range their bodies’ trigger the same autonomic and neurological warnings as if their blood glucose had fallen into the danger zone. Gradually bringing yourself into better control will help accustom your body to lower blood glucose levels. The other cause of pseudo-hypoglycemia occurs when glucose levels drop rapidly in a short time period. This can happen when exercising vigorously and can oc Continue reading >>

Is Random Sugar Of 117 Normal?

Is Random Sugar Of 117 Normal?

QUESTION: Sir, No Charge Glucose Meter - OneTouch Verio Flex® Meter Ad Compact Design to Track Your Glucose On-the-Go. Get It At No Charge. OneTouch Learn more I want to know that my random blood sugar level is 117. So, can u tell me if my sugar is normal or not or am i diabetic patient and if so plz tell me the remedies also to cure my disease. ANSWER: Hi Amita, According to ADA/EASD hyperglycemia management guidelines, blood sugar levels targets should be set personally and specifically for each person according to their age, body indexes (weight, height) and other diseases and conditions they might have. Based on this, I should have these data of yours. If you a young person, such glucose levels can be accepted due to high metabolism rate of the young people. However, if you are a mature person with other diseases; then, I should ask you to go for the next steps as the following. In addition, I want you to measure your blood sugar levels for 2 subsequently weeks (each day at one precise time). Next, I would like to ask you to measure fasting blood sugar, oral-glucose tolerance test, and A1C test. All these data are necessary to give an exact diagnosis. Once I would have all these data, I could give an exact answer whether you are a diabetic, a pre-diabetic or a going-to-be:). All the best! Dr.Alba Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugar Range After Meals

Normal Blood Sugar Range After Meals

Monitoring is the only way to tell if your blood sugar is consistently staying with in range. Even non-diabetics should check their blood sugar every once in awhile to catch the potential development of the disease early. For non-diabetics, checking post-meal blood sugars is a good way to keep an eye on the potential developing disease. For diabetics, keeping an eye on after meal blood sugars is critical for to make sure the correct amount of insulin is being administered with meals. Video of the Day Blood sugar describes the molecule glucose that circulates in the blood. Glucose is the energy source that we get from the food you eat, specifically carbohydrates, and required by the body’s tissues to perform all of its basic functions. Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas that allows cells to take in glucose from the blood to use as energy. The tissue cells do not take in all of the sugar in the blood though; there is a specific amount that bodies like to keep in the bloodstream, according to the Blood Sugar Diabetic website. How Food Affects Blood Sugar When you eat, digestion breaks down food into smaller molecules to be absorbed into your tissues. Even before you take your first bite, your pancreas produces insulin in preparation for increased blood sugar and therefore energy absorption into cells. Carbohydrates are the main source for glucose, but protein can increase blood sugar, as well. But not all carbohydrates are created equal. Simple carbohydrates such as white bread, fruit, milk, and candy raise blood sugar more quickly than complex carbohydrates such as whole grains, vegetables, and beans. A non diabetic’s blood sugar level should be between 70 and 140 mg/dL one to two hours after a meal, according to the American Diabetes Association. If it is Continue reading >>

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

In the next two articles we’re going to discuss the concept of “normal” blood sugar. I say concept and put normal in quotation marks because what passes for normal in mainstream medicine turns out to be anything but normal if optimal health and function are what you’re interested in. Here’s the thing. We’ve confused normal with common. Just because something is common, doesn’t mean it’s normal. It’s now becoming common for kids to be overweight and diabetic because they eat nothing but refined flour, high-fructose corn syrup and industrial seed oils. Yet I don’t think anyone (even the ADA) would argue that being fat and metabolically deranged is even remotely close to normal for kids. Or adults, for that matter. In the same way, the guidelines the so-called authorities like the ADA have set for normal blood sugar may be common, but they’re certainly not normal. Unless you think it’s normal for people to develop diabetic complications like neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular disease as they age, and spend the last several years of their lives in hospitals or assisted living facilities. Common, but not normal. In this article I’m going to introduce the three markers we use to measure blood sugar, and tell you what the conventional model thinks is normal for those markers. In the next article, I’m going to show you what the research says is normal for healthy people. And I’m also going to show you that so-called normal blood sugar, as dictated by the ADA, can double your risk of heart disease and lead to all kinds of complications down the road. The 3 ways blood sugar is measured Fasting blood glucose This is still the most common marker used in clinical settings, and is often the only one that gets tested. The fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Sugar)

Introduction Hypoglycaemia, or a "hypo", is an abnormally low level of glucose in your blood (less than four millimoles per litre). When your glucose (sugar) level is too low, your body doesn't have enough energy to carry out its activities. Hypoglycaemia is most commonly associated with diabetes, and mainly occurs if someone with diabetes takes too much insulin, misses a meal or exercises too hard. In rare cases, it's possible for a person who doesn't have diabetes to experience hypoglycaemia. It can be triggered by malnutrition, binge drinking or certain conditions, such as Addison's disease. Read more about the causes of hypoglycaemia Symptoms of hypoglycaemia Most people will have some warning that their blood glucose levels are too low, which gives them time to correct them. Symptoms usually occur when blood sugar levels fall below four millimoles (mmol) per litre. Typical early warning signs are feeling hungry, trembling or shakiness, and sweating. In more severe cases, you may also feel confused and have difficulty concentrating. In very severe cases, a person experiencing hypoglycaemia can lose consciousness. It's also possible for hypoglycaemia to occur during sleep, which can cause excess sweating, disturbed sleep, and feeling tired and confused upon waking. Read more about the symptoms of hypoglycaemia Correcting hypoglycaemia The immediate treatment for hypoglycaemia is to have some food or drink that contains sugar, such as dextrose tablets or fruit juice, to correct your blood glucose levels. After having something sugary, you may need to have a longer-acting "starchy" carbohydrate food, such as a sandwich or a few biscuits. If hypoglycaemia causes a loss of consciousness, an injection of the hormone glucagon can be given to raise blood glucose levels and Continue reading >>

Effects Of Packed Red Cell Transfusion On Blood Glucose Concentrations In Beta Thalassemia Major (btm) Ashort Presentations Of Personal Experience

Effects Of Packed Red Cell Transfusion On Blood Glucose Concentrations In Beta Thalassemia Major (btm) Ashort Presentations Of Personal Experience

The most accurate method with which to evaluate altered glucose metabolism in patients with TM is still controversial. Even if the annual oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) by the age of 10 years is the recommended method, a diagnosis of 'normal' glucose tolerance during OGTT does not exclude abnormal postprandial glucose levels at home . There is now evidence that the OGTT method, evaluating fasting and 2-h post load glucose, may miss episodes of hyperglycaemia . Furthermore, the credibility of Hb A1c has been questioned because the hemoglobin composition of patients' erythrocytes are considerably modified, due to regular and frequent transfusions. The results may be falsely increased or decreased depending on the proximity to transfusion, shortened erythrocyte lifespan and the assay used . It has been demonstrated recently that the continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) is a useful and valid tool in defining glucose metabolism in children and adults affected by TM with early glucose derangements . Indeed, the CGMS allows monitoring of glycaemic profiles throughout a period of 72 h for a total of 288 glycaemic registrations per day. It identifies glycaemic excursions and constitutes a valid device to understand the 24-h glycaemic trend and profiles. Rimondiet al. investigated the value of using CGMS in six TM patients with abnormal glucose homeostasis after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) . Two-hour OGTT glucose values and CGMS fluctuations were classified as normal if < 7.8 mmol/l, impaired if 7.8 to 11.1 mmol/l, diabetic if > 11.1 mmol/l. The TM patients spent from 1 to 23% of the time with a blood glucose level from 7.8 to 11.1 mmol/l. we evaluate three patients with Beta Thalassemai major using CGMS Patient 1 A 15 year old male with TM presented with noc Continue reading >>

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