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A High Sugar Level After A Meal

A High Sugar Level After A Meal

Written by Sharon Perkins ; Updated August 23, 2017 Make sure your blood sugar doesn't rise too much after you eat. 4 Should You Skip a Meal if Your Blood Glucose Is High? It's normal for your blood sugar level to rise after you eat, especially if you eat a meal high in refined carbohydrates. But if your blood sugar rises more than most people's, you might have diabetes or pre-diabetes, a condition that indicates a strong risk for developing diabetes in the future. If you already have diabetes, you doctor will recommend keeping your blood sugar within a prescribed range. A glucose tolerance test, done one to three hours after you eat a high-carbohydrate meal, can check your blood sugar levels. When you eat carbohydrates, your body breaks down the sugars they contain into glucose. Your body can't absorb most sugars without breaking them down first. Simple sugars such as refined sugar break down very quickly; you absorb them rapidly into your bloodstream, which raises your blood sugar. In healthy people, the levels don't rise very high and they drop back to normal quickly. If you have diabetes, your levels after a meal will rise higher and stay high longer than levels in other people. This occurs because your pancreas either don't release enough insulin, the hormone that helps cells absorb glucose, or because the cells don't respond properly to insulin release. If your doctor suspects that you have abnormal glucose levels, he might suggest doing a glucose tolerance test. You are given around 75 grams of carbohydrate after fasting for 12 hours. At one- to three-hour intervals, your doctor draws blood and analyzes your glucose levels. A normal fasting glucose is 60 to 100 milligrams per deciliter; your levels should rise no higher than 200 mg/dl one hour after eating and n Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugar Range After Meals

Normal Blood Sugar Range After Meals

Monitoring is the only way to tell if your blood sugar is consistently staying with in range. Even non-diabetics should check their blood sugar every once in awhile to catch the potential development of the disease early. For non-diabetics, checking post-meal blood sugars is a good way to keep an eye on the potential developing disease. For diabetics, keeping an eye on after meal blood sugars is critical for to make sure the correct amount of insulin is being administered with meals. Video of the Day Blood sugar describes the molecule glucose that circulates in the blood. Glucose is the energy source that we get from the food you eat, specifically carbohydrates, and required by the body’s tissues to perform all of its basic functions. Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas that allows cells to take in glucose from the blood to use as energy. The tissue cells do not take in all of the sugar in the blood though; there is a specific amount that bodies like to keep in the bloodstream, according to the Blood Sugar Diabetic website. How Food Affects Blood Sugar When you eat, digestion breaks down food into smaller molecules to be absorbed into your tissues. Even before you take your first bite, your pancreas produces insulin in preparation for increased blood sugar and therefore energy absorption into cells. Carbohydrates are the main source for glucose, but protein can increase blood sugar, as well. But not all carbohydrates are created equal. Simple carbohydrates such as white bread, fruit, milk, and candy raise blood sugar more quickly than complex carbohydrates such as whole grains, vegetables, and beans. A non diabetic’s blood sugar level should be between 70 and 140 mg/dL one to two hours after a meal, according to the American Diabetes Association. If it is Continue reading >>

Want To Know If Your Diet Is Healthy? Track Your Blood Sugar.

Want To Know If Your Diet Is Healthy? Track Your Blood Sugar.

Are you confused if what you are eating is healthy? Are whole grains good for us? Do we need to be gluten free? Should we be eating dairy regularly? What about fruit? Nuts? Beans? Ahhhhhhhh! Let’s face it, there is A LOT of conflicting diet information out there. Where do you even start? Well it all comes down to one very basic thing…your blood sugar. It doesn’t have to be complicated. It doesn’t have to take weeks of diet diaries and calorie counting. Nor does it require reading endless books, websites, studies, and journals to get the most up-to-date nutrition advice. It is really quite simple, and it can be tested. Wouldn’t it be great to know when you eat something how the inside of your body responds? Does it give you the green light or the red light? Well, you can learn this with a very inexpensive piece of equipment that you can find at any drug store or pharmacy called a glucose meter or glucometer. Click here for a video tutorial on how to test your blood sugar. ……. So, ask your body what it thinks of the food you are eating by taking your blood sugar. Here is a quick & very basic break down on how your blood sugar works. Step 1: You eat a food Step 2: It gets broken down into two categories: stuff the body will use and stuff that will become waste Step 3: Glucose, aka blood sugar, is one of the essential breakdown products of food that the body and brain use for fuel Step 4: Depending on the types of food you just ate, your blood sugar rises. If you just ate a meal high in starch and sugar, your blood sugar rises high over a normal fasting level. If you just had a meal of healthy fats and proteins, your blood sugar does not rise as high. ……. Having a normal functioning blood sugar is the key to optimal health and the prevention of chronic dis Continue reading >>

Effects Of Packed Red Cell Transfusion On Blood Glucose Concentrations In Beta Thalassemia Major (btm) Ashort Presentations Of Personal Experience

Effects Of Packed Red Cell Transfusion On Blood Glucose Concentrations In Beta Thalassemia Major (btm) Ashort Presentations Of Personal Experience

The most accurate method with which to evaluate altered glucose metabolism in patients with TM is still controversial. Even if the annual oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) by the age of 10 years is the recommended method, a diagnosis of 'normal' glucose tolerance during OGTT does not exclude abnormal postprandial glucose levels at home . There is now evidence that the OGTT method, evaluating fasting and 2-h post load glucose, may miss episodes of hyperglycaemia . Furthermore, the credibility of Hb A1c has been questioned because the hemoglobin composition of patients' erythrocytes are considerably modified, due to regular and frequent transfusions. The results may be falsely increased or decreased depending on the proximity to transfusion, shortened erythrocyte lifespan and the assay used . It has been demonstrated recently that the continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) is a useful and valid tool in defining glucose metabolism in children and adults affected by TM with early glucose derangements . Indeed, the CGMS allows monitoring of glycaemic profiles throughout a period of 72 h for a total of 288 glycaemic registrations per day. It identifies glycaemic excursions and constitutes a valid device to understand the 24-h glycaemic trend and profiles. Rimondiet al. investigated the value of using CGMS in six TM patients with abnormal glucose homeostasis after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) . Two-hour OGTT glucose values and CGMS fluctuations were classified as normal if < 7.8 mmol/l, impaired if 7.8 to 11.1 mmol/l, diabetic if > 11.1 mmol/l. The TM patients spent from 1 to 23% of the time with a blood glucose level from 7.8 to 11.1 mmol/l. we evaluate three patients with Beta Thalassemai major using CGMS Patient 1 A 15 year old male with TM presented with noc Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Average Blood Sugar

Understanding Your Average Blood Sugar

A1c is an average of all your blood sugars. It does not tell you your blood sugar patterns. Use it only as yet another indicator of how well you’re doing. Glysolated Hemoglobin (or A1c) is a measure of your average blood glucose control over the previous three months. Glucose attaches to hemoglobin the oxygen carrying molecule in red blood cells. The glucose-hemoglobin unit is called glycosolated hemoglobin. As red blood cells live an average of three months, the glycosolated hemoglobin reflects the sugar exposure to the cells over that time. The higher the amount of glucose in the blood, the higher the percentage of hemoglobin molecules that will have glucose attached. Think of the A1c as a long-term blood glucose measure that changes very gradually as red blood cells die and are replaced by new cells. The A1c doesn’t replace self blood-glucose monitoring. Because the A1c is an average of all your blood sugars, it does not tell you your blood sugar patterns. For example, one person with frequent highs and lows can have the same A1c as another person with very stable blood sugars that don’t vary too much. So what’s the point? A1c is yet another indicator of how well you’re doing. An A1c measurement between 4-6% is considered the range that someone without diabetes will have. The American Diabetes Association goal is an A1c less than 7%. Research has shown that an A1c less than 7% lowers risk for complications. The American College of Endocrinology goal is an A1c less than 6.5%. For some people with diabetes an A1c goal of less than 6% is appropriate. Talk with your doctor about your A1c goal. Use this chart to view A1c values and comparable blood glucose values: A1c Estimated Average Glucose mg/dL 5% 97 6% 126 7% 154 8% 183 9% 212 10% 240 11% 269 12% 298 A not Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Print Overview Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels and kidneys — may already be starting. There's good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn't inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children's blood sugar levels back to normal. Symptoms Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you've moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Blurred vision When to see a doctor See your doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any type 2 diabetes signs or symptoms. Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for prediabetes. Causes The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat — especially abdominal fat — also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don't process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead o Continue reading >>

Patient Comments: Hemoglobin A1c Test - High Results

Patient Comments: Hemoglobin A1c Test - High Results

I have been doing a lot of research on CIN1. I was 26 when my doctor told me I have cervical dysplasia (CIN1), January of 20017. I didn't think anything of it. But then she told me I have HPV high risk E6/E7 mRNA. One day I was looking through my medical records online and discovered I had CIN1 3 years ago July of 2014 and my doctor never told me. Now I am stressing over it because my periods are irregular and when I do have them they are strange. Also the year of 2014 I told my doctor I was having clots the size of 2 half dollars put together and she didn't say anything either. I get pelvic pain sometimes. She did a biopsy and I was positive for CIN1 and high risk HPV and ascus. I don't know what I should do, maybe I should get a new doctor. In May 2015 I was really tired, lethargic and bloated all the time. I was so constipated and miserable. I had been gluten free for 4 years by self-diagnosis. Finally, I went to a gastroenterologist. My blood work came back positive for Helicobacter pylori. The doctor said that H. pylori causes similar symptoms as gluten allergies. I had an endoscopy and colonoscopy which showed all of the internal inflammation and prior damage from the bacteria. It seemed to be dormant so there was no need for eradication, however the prescription acid reflux pills made me sick so I stopped that. Now I take probiotics and manuka honey and feel great. Try to avoid the prescription drugs. I have to go back for a check up to see if the bacteria is gone. I just had a laparoscopy 2 days ago and other than feeling full and bloated from the gas and a soreness around the incisions, I feel pretty good. The day of the surgery when I came home, I was very sleepy and slept for almost 2 days with getting up, except here and there to use the bathroom and eat. My Continue reading >>

Is 128 Mg/dl Blood Sugar From A Glucose Test Normal?

Is 128 Mg/dl Blood Sugar From A Glucose Test Normal?

Here we will look at a 128 mg/dL blood sugar level from a Glucose test result and tell you what it may mean. Is 128 mg/dL blood sugar good or bad? Note that blood sugar tests should be done multiple times and the 128 mg/dL blood sugar level should be an average of those numbers. (function(){var aa="function"==typeof Object.create?Object.create:function(a){var b=function(){};b.prototype=a;return new b},m;if("function"==typeof Object.setPrototypeOf)m=Object.setPrototypeOf;else{var n;a:{var ba={a:!0},ca={};try{ca.__proto__=ba;n=ca.a;break a}catch(a){}n=!1}m=n?function(a,b){a.__proto__=b;if(a.__proto__!==b)throw new TypeError(a+" is not extensible");return a}:null} var da=m,p=this,ea=function(a){var b=typeof a;if("object"==b)if(a){if(a instanceof Array)return"array";if(a instanceof Object)return b;var c=Object.prototype.toString.call(a);if("[object Window]"==c)return"object";if("[object Array]"==c||"number"==typeof a.length&&"undefined"!=typeof a.splice&&"undefined"!=typeof a.propertyIsEnumerable&&!a.propertyIsEnumerable("splice"))return"array";if("[object Function]"==c||"undefined"!=typeof a.call&&"undefined"!=typeof a.propertyIsEnumerable&&!a.propertyIsEnumerable("call"))return"function"}else return"null"; else if("function"==b&&"undefined"==typeof a.call)return"object";return b},ha=function(a,b){var c=Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments,1);return function(){var b=c.slice();b.push.apply(b,arguments);return a.apply(this,b)}},ia=Date.now||function(){return+new Date};var ja=Array.prototype.forEach?function(a,b){Array.prototype.forEach.call(a,b,void 0)}:function(a,b){for(var c=a.length,d="string"==typeof a?a.split(""):a,e=0;eContinue reading >>

Fasting Blood Glucose Test

Fasting Blood Glucose Test

Fasting blood sugar levels are self-explanatory to some extent in that they are the blood glucose results you get when undertaking a period of fasting. Fasting is frequently deemed as being at least 8 hours after taking nutrition. This means that blood glucose levels will be taken at a time when your body is less likely to be digesting food. Why measure fasting blood glucose levels? Measuring fasting blood sugar levels can be useful for a number of different reasons including: Diagnosing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes Monitoring the extent of glucose intolerance in people with insulin resistance Setting basal insulin rates in people with type 1 diabetes How is a fasting blood glucose test carried out? A fasting blood glucose test can be carried out either with blood taken from your arm which is tested in a lab, or it can be carried out with a finger prick blood test and a blood glucose meter. A fasting blood glucose involves fasting, not taking food or any non-water drink, for at least 8 hours. A lab tested sample, also known as a fasting plasma glucose test, provides a more accurate result so this method will be used to diagnose or monitor glucose intolerance. When testing to inform basal dose setting of insulin, results from a blood glucose meter will be sufficient. Diagnosis A fasting blood glucose test can be used to diagnose diabetes or Impaired Fasting Glycemia, a condition that has a high risk of developing into type 2 diabetes. Condition indicated Blood glucose level (mg/dl) Normal Under 100 Impaired Fasting Glycemia 100 to 125 Diabetes 126 or more Monitor glucose intolerance If you have a form of glucose intolerance such as pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes, your health team may wish to carry out a fasting plasma glucose test to monitor how well your body copes Continue reading >>

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

In the next two articles we’re going to discuss the concept of “normal” blood sugar. I say concept and put normal in quotation marks because what passes for normal in mainstream medicine turns out to be anything but normal if optimal health and function are what you’re interested in. Here’s the thing. We’ve confused normal with common. Just because something is common, doesn’t mean it’s normal. It’s now becoming common for kids to be overweight and diabetic because they eat nothing but refined flour, high-fructose corn syrup and industrial seed oils. Yet I don’t think anyone (even the ADA) would argue that being fat and metabolically deranged is even remotely close to normal for kids. Or adults, for that matter. In the same way, the guidelines the so-called authorities like the ADA have set for normal blood sugar may be common, but they’re certainly not normal. Unless you think it’s normal for people to develop diabetic complications like neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular disease as they age, and spend the last several years of their lives in hospitals or assisted living facilities. Common, but not normal. In this article I’m going to introduce the three markers we use to measure blood sugar, and tell you what the conventional model thinks is normal for those markers. In the next article, I’m going to show you what the research says is normal for healthy people. And I’m also going to show you that so-called normal blood sugar, as dictated by the ADA, can double your risk of heart disease and lead to all kinds of complications down the road. The 3 ways blood sugar is measured Fasting blood glucose This is still the most common marker used in clinical settings, and is often the only one that gets tested. The fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

Michael: 128 Lbs Lost | Central Ohio Nutrition Center

Michael: 128 Lbs Lost | Central Ohio Nutrition Center

Michael: 128 lbs Lost Staff 2018-04-12T21:52:13+00:00 For years Michael H. kept putting off doing something about his weight. With weight now threatening his health and quality of life, Michael stated that he first got angry about not taking better care of himself, and then became scared of the possible consequences of not acting on his excess weight. Now in his 50s, Michael decided it was time to stop the perpetual procrastination and make some changes. Michaels primary care physician suggested he try the OPTIFAST program . Feeling comfortable about his physicians recommendation, he started the program in October of 2012. By May of 2013, Michael had lost 118 pounds in just 7 months. Since he transitioned back to a food plan, he has lost an additional 10 pounds for a total of 128! Before starting the diet, Michaels blood pressure was high and poorly controlled. His blood pressure is now normal without the use of medication. His blood sugar and cholesterol, both elevated before losing weight, are now normal. He no longer fits the profile for metabolic syndrome as he had before weight loss. Body Mass Index (BMI) dropped from 42 to a much healthier 26. Percentage body fat plummeted from 36 to 17. Due to weight loss, Michael is taking much better care of himself and taking responsibility for his health. Other good things happen as a result of weight loss. Michael enjoys every aspect of movement since it does not require the effort it did previously. Others view him differently and take him more seriously now that he carries less weight. It feels good to fit in. Michaels advice to others is to remember that you are human and that weight loss is tough to do alone. Join a reputable program with professionals who can help you through the process and continue to provide support Continue reading >>

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Here you'll find info about why blood sugar is high in the morning, along with tips and resources to lower those numbers! A while back I had a client sending me her blood sugar charts every few days and on those charts she always made some notes if she had questions. Every time she sent them through, I noticed she had 3 big question marks (???) against her morning blood sugar results. And on another morning when her morning blood sugar levels were high at 160 mg/dl (or 8.9 mmol/l). She had written: I don't understand. 97 mg/dl (or 5.5mmol/l) last night when I went to sleep. I didn't eat anything because I didn't feel well. Humm… I was also over in one of the online diabetes groups I'm involved in today and this message popped up. I'm struggling with my morning BS number. When I went to bed around 11PM my BS was 107. I'm waking up with my BS between 120 – 135. I did put two pieces of string cheese next to my bed and when I woke up around 3am, I ate one. Since I was told to eat protein at night. When I woke up 3 hours later my BS was 130. I didn't want to eat anything large since it's so close to 140 (my goal is to keep it below 140). So I had 1 piece of toast (sugar free wheat bread) and just a tiny bit of peanut butter. I checked it an hour later and it was 161! What am I doing wrong? Do these morning situations sound familiar to you? Are you constantly questioning: Why is blood sugar high in the morning? I mean, logically we'd think that it should be at it's lowest in the morning right? Well don't panic, there is a reason for it, so let's explore why morning blood sugar is often higher. And at the end, I'll also point you toward some resources to help you lower those levels. Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning? Although it would seem logical that your body would Continue reading >>

Muro 128 Ophthalmic (eye) : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Muro 128 Ophthalmic (eye) : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

This product is used to reduce swelling of the surface of the eye ( cornea ) in certain eye conditions. Decreasing swelling of the cornea may lessen eye discomfort or irritation caused by the swelling. This product works by drawing fluid out of the cornea to reduce swelling. This product is for use as an eye drop as directed. Follow all directions on the product package. If you are uncertain about any of the information, consult your doctor or pharmacist . If you are wearing contact lenses , remove them before using eye drops. Wait at least 15 minutes before replacing your contact lenses . To apply eye drops, wash your hands first. To avoid contamination, do not touch the dropper tip or let it touch your eye or any other surface. Tilt your head back, look up, and pull down the lower eyelid to make a pouch. Hold the dropper directly over your eye and place 1 drop into the pouch. Release the eyelid and gently close your eyes . Place one finger at the corner of your eye (near the nose) and apply gentle pressure for 1 to 2 minutes. This will prevent the medication from draining out. Try not to blink and do not rub your eye. Repeat these steps if your dose is for more than 1 drop and for your other eye if so directed. Do not rinse the dropper. Replace the dropper cap after each use. Remove extra solution around the eye with a tissue, and wash your hands to remove any medicine that may be on them. If you are using another kind of eye medication (e.g., drops or ointments), wait at least 5 minutes before using the other medication. Use eye drops before ointments to allow the eye drops to enter the eye. This product is recommended for use under a doctor's direction. If your condition worsens, if it persists for more than 3 days, or if you think you may have a serious medical pr Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

There are two reasons why your blood sugar levels may be high in the morning – the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect. The dawn phenomenon is the end result of a combination of natural body changes that occur during the sleep cycle and can be explained as follows: Your body has little need for insulin between about midnight and about 3:00 a.m. (a time when your body is sleeping most soundly). Any insulin taken in the evening causes blood sugar levels to drop sharply during this time. Then, between 3:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., your body starts churning out stored glucose (sugar) to prepare for the upcoming day as well as releases hormones that reduce the body's sensitivity to insulin. All of these events happen as your bedtime insulin dose is also wearing off. These events, taken together, cause your body's blood sugar levels to rise in the morning (at "dawn"). A second cause of high blood sugar levels in the morning might be due to the Somogyi effect (named after the doctor who first wrote about it). This condition is also called "rebound hyperglycemia." Although the cascade of events and end result – high blood sugar levels in the morning – is the same as in the dawn phenomenon, the cause is more "man-made" (a result of poor diabetes management) in the Somogyi effect. There are two potential causes. In one scenario, your blood sugar may drop too low in the middle of the night and then your body releases hormones to raise the sugar levels. This could happen if you took too much insulin earlier or if you did not have enough of a bedtime snack. The other scenario is when your dose of long-acting insulin at bedtime is not enough and you wake up with a high morning blood sugar. How is it determined if the dawn phenomenon or Somogyi effect is causing the high blood sug Continue reading >>

1. Is Your Blood Pressure Higher Than 139/89?

1. Is Your Blood Pressure Higher Than 139/89?

High blood pressure is a blood pressure reading of 140/90 mmHg or higher. Both numbers are important. About one in every three American adults has high blood pressure. Once high blood pressure develops, it usually lasts a lifetime. The good news is that it can be treated and controlled. High blood pressure is called "the silent killer" because it usually has no symptoms. Some people may not find out they have it until permanent damage to their heart, brain or kidneys has occurred. When high blood pressure is not found and treated, it can cause: the heart to get larger, which may lead to heart failure small bulges (aneurysms) to form in blood vessels; common locations are the main artery from the heart (aorta), arteries in the brain, legs and intestines, and the artery leading to the spleen blood vessels in the kidney to narrow, which may cause kidney failure arteries throughout the body to "harden" faster, especially those in the heart, brain, kidneys and legs; this can cause a heart attack, stroke, kidney failure or amputation of part of the leg blood vessels in the eyes to burst or bleed, which may cause vision changes and can result in blindness. What is blood pressure? Blood is carried from the heart to all parts of the body in vessels called arteries. Blood pressure is the force of the blood pushing against the walls of the arteries. Each time the heart beats (about 60-70 times a minute at rest), it pumps out blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is at its highest when the heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When the heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is the diastolic pressure. Blood pressure is always given as these two numbers, the systolic and diastolic pressures. Both are important. Usually they Continue reading >>

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