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103 Blood Sugar After Eating

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

If you have diabetes, your blood sugar doesn't call your cell phone and say, "My readings are too high right now." Instead, blood sugar rises slowly and gradually, causing complications that may damage your organs -- heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, feet, and even skin are at risk. Sometimes you wonder, "Is my blood sugar too high? Too low?" because "normal" levels are so important. "Diabetes is not a 'one-size-fits-all' condition, and neither are blood sugar readings. Different targets are established for different populations," says Amber Taylor, M.D., director of the Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Targets may vary depending on a person's age, whether they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and for how long, what medications they're taking, whether they have complications, and, if the patient is a female, whether she is pregnant. "Patients on insulin may need to test more frequently than someone on oral agents," says Taylor. "Those with type 1 diabetes always require insulin, but many with type 2 diabetes also need it." Target Blood Sugar Levels If you have diabetes, these are target "control" blood glucose levels, using a rating of milligrams to deciliter, or mg/dl: Blood sugar levels before meals (preprandial): 70 to 130 mg/dL Blood sugar levels one to two hours after the start of a meal (postprandial): less than 180 mg/dL Blood sugar levels indicating hypoglycemia or low blood glucose: 70 or below mg/dL Types of Blood Sugar Tests Blood glucose testing can screen, diagnose, and monitor. Glucose is measured either after fasting for eight to ten hours, at a random time, following a meal (postprandial), or as part of an oral glucose challenge or tolerance test. You can compare your levels to these results for specific tests, based on clinical Continue reading >>

What Is A Healthy Blood Sugar Level?

What Is A Healthy Blood Sugar Level?

If you don't have diabetes, a healthy blood sugar is less than 126, says Holly Anderson, Outpatient Diabetes Coordinator at Reston Hospital Center. Watch this video to find out the healthy level for someone with diabetes. A healthy blood sugar level, obtained in a fasting state, is less than 100. A fasting blood sugar of greater than 126 is diabetic. A fasting blood sugar between 100 and 126 is considered "prediabetic". Prediabetes can be associated with increased risk for heart disease and should lead to lifestyle changes. Trinity Health is a Catholic health care organization that acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition and does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. In case of emergency call 911. This site is educational and not a substitute for professional medical advice, always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider. According to the American Diabetes Association, normal blood glucose ranges between 70 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). In a person without diabetes, the body keeps its blood-glucose level between meals in a range of about 70 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). This level will rise after eating, depending on the type and amount of food consumed, but it will not exceed 139 mg/dL. It also quickly returns to the between-meal range. After you have fasted overnight or for an eight-hour period, your doctor can measure your blood glucose levels with a basic blood test. Blood sugar levels of under 100 are considered normal after an eight-hour fast. However, fasting blood glucose levels between 100-125 mg/dl could signal prediabetes. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

A - A + Main Document Quote: "A number of medical studies have shown a dramatic relationship between elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance in people who are not very active on a daily or regular basis." A doctor might order a test of the sugar level in a person's blood if there is a concern that they may have diabetes, or have a sugar level that is either too low or too high. The test, which is also called a check of blood sugar, blood glucose, fasting blood sugar, fasting plasma glucose, or fasting blood glucose, indicates how much glucose is present is present in a person's blood. When a person eats carbohydrates, such as pasta, bread or fruit, their body converts the carbohydrates to sugar - also referred to as glucose. Glucose travels through the blood to supply energy to the cells, to include muscle and brain cells, as well as to organs. Blood sugar levels usually fluctuate depending upon what a person eats and how long it has been since they last ate. However; consistent or extremely low levels of glucose in a person's blood might cause symptoms such as: Anxiety Sweating Dizziness Confusion Nervousness Warning signs of dangerously high levels of blood sugar include sleepiness or confusion, dry mouth, extreme thirst, high fever, hallucinations, loss of vision, or skin that is warm and dry. A blood sugar test requires a finger prick or needle stick. A doctor might order a, 'fasting,' blood glucose test. What this means is a person will not be able to drink or eat for 8-10 hours before the test, or the doctor may order the test for a random time or right after the person eats. If a woman is pregnant, her doctor might order a, 'glucose-tolerance test,' which involves drinking glucose solution and having blood drawn a specified amount of time later. The re Continue reading >>

Non-fasting Blood Sugar Levels

Non-fasting Blood Sugar Levels

Non-fasting blood sugar levels are considered random readings where a person's levels should be no higher than 200 mg/dl, or it indicates type 2 diabetes. A fasting glucose level, on the other hand, should be no higher than 126. Further tests provide insight into how long it takes a person's blood sugar to spike and drop after eating. Warning Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include having close relatives with the condition, being over 45 years of age, being overweight, not exercising on a regular basis, and having gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Because symptoms can be mild for months or even years, type 2 often is initially indicated during a routine non-fasting blood test. Considerations Diabetes cannot be confirmed by non-fasting blood sugar levels, so physicians require fasting tests as well. Diabetes is suspected if the non-fasting level is higher than 200 mg/dl, especially if the patient also has symptoms of increased thirst and urination, along with fatigue. Even soon after eating, such high blood sugar numbers are considered unhealthy. The physician will advise the person to return for a fasting blood sugar test, which is performed after at least eight hours with no food. Identification A fasting blood sugar level indicates type 2 diabetes if the reading is higher than 126 on two separate days. Numbers between 100 and 126 are considered impaired, or pre-diabetes, where a person can more easily return to normal levels through diet changes and exercise. Types A glucose tolerance test is another type of non-fasting blood sugar diagnostic procedure. The patient typically drinks water with a specific amount of glucose added, and then a health care professional determines how long it takes the blood sugar level to peak and return to normal. Levels should drop Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

Thank you for visiting my website! If you need help lowering your blood sugar level, check out my books at Amazon or Smashwords. If you’re outside of the U.S., Smashwords may be the best source. —Steve Parker, M.D. * * * Physicians focus so much on disease that we sometimes lose sight of what’s healthy and normal. For instance, the American Diabetes Association defines “tight” control of diabetes to include sugar levels as high as 179 mg/dl (9.94 mmol/l) when measured two hours after a meal. In contrast, young adults without diabetes two hours after a meal are usually in the range of 90 to 110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l). What Is a Normal Blood Sugar Level? The following numbers refer to average blood sugar (glucose) levels in venous plasma, as measured in a lab. Portable home glucose meters measure sugar in capillary whole blood. Many, but not all, meters in 2010 are calibrated to compare directly to venous plasma levels. Fasting blood sugar after a night of sleep and before breakfast: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) One hour after a meal: 110 mg/dl (6.11 mmol/l) Two hours after a meal: 95 mg/dl (5.28 mmol/l) Five hours after a meal: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) (The aforementioned meal derives 50–55% of its energy from carbohydrate) ♦ ♦ ♦ Ranges of blood sugar for young healthy non-diabetic adults: Fasting blood sugar: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) One hour after a typical meal: 90–125 mg/dl (5.00–6.94 mmol/l) Two hours after a typical meal: 90–110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l) Five hours after a typical meal: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) Blood sugars tend to be a bit lower in pregnant women. ♦ ♦ ♦ What Level of Blood Sugar Defines Diabetes and Prediabetes? According to the 2007 guidelines issued by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinol Continue reading >>

Morning Highs? How To Lower Morning Blood Sugar

Morning Highs? How To Lower Morning Blood Sugar

As Type 2 Diabetes Develops During the years when type 2 diabetes slowly develops (which may be up to 10 years through developing metabolic syndrome and continuing on to prediabetes), hormonal control of blood glucose breaks down. To understand how your body responds, it's important to understand the essential hormones involved in blood glucose control. Four hormones are involved in blood glucose control: Insulin, made in the beta cells of the pancreas, helps the body use glucose from food by enabling glucose to move into the body's cells for energy. People with type 2 diabetes have slowly dwindling insulin reserves. Amylin, secreted from the beta cells, slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream after eating by slowing stomach-emptying and increasing the feeling of fullness. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are amylin-deficient. Incretins, hormones secreted from the intestines that include glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), enhance the body's release of insulin after eating. This in turn slows stomach-emptying, promotes fullness, delays the release of glucose into the bloodstream, and prevents the pancreas from releasing glucagon, putting less glucose into the blood. Glucagon, made in the alpha cells of the pancreas, breaks down glucose stored in the liver and muscles and releases it to provide energy when glucose from food isn't available Out-of-Control Blood Sugar During Sleep For people in the early years of type 2 diabetes, the hormones that control blood sugar can particularly go awry. Here's what happens during sleep to a person with type 2 diabetes: "Overnight, the liver and muscles get the message from excess glucagon to ramp up the glucose supply because the person is sleeping, not eating," says Marty Irons, R.Ph., CDE. "There is not enough GLP-1, i Continue reading >>

Your Average Blood Sugar: Why It Really Matters

Your Average Blood Sugar: Why It Really Matters

If there was a blood test that could give you valuable information about a major, yet reversible risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and age related dementia, would you want to take it? What if that same blood test could also give you information about your risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, vision loss, cancer and how fast you can expect your body to age? What if the test was really cheap? Now, what if you knew that what you were going to have to do to reverse your risk of all these conditions was going to be personally challenging, maybe even really hard, would you still want to take the test? Something to think about, isn’t it? The test I’m talking about does exist. It’s a simple little test that’s run all the time. It’s full implications are rarely considered, however. The test It’s called “hemoglobin A1c” and is sometimes referred to simply as the “A1c” test. In essence, it measures the amount of sugar that has become stuck to the hemoglobin in your red blood cells (hemoglobin is the component in blood that carries oxygen). Because red blood cells live for about 3 to 4 months, the test is usually used to estimate an “average blood sugar” for the previous 3 months. The more sugar floating around in your blood on a daily basis, the higher you A1c value will be. In conventional medicine the test is used to diagnose and monitor treatment goals for diabetics. The implications of a person’s A1c value run much deeper, however. Sugar within the body doesn’t just stick to hemoglobin. It sticks to many tissues that are made of proteins and fats (this accounts for most tissues in your body by the way) and can bind directly to DNA. The compounds formed by this process are called advanced glycation end products or “AGEs” for Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Of 103 Mg/dl For 27 Year Old?

Blood Sugar Of 103 Mg/dl For 27 Year Old?

My fasting blood sugar was 103 mg/dl. Is this high. I am not obese and fairly fit. Can someone quickly answer me this? This is not normal though lab range is wide. Fasting BS should be less than 90. Check you post meal sugar also. Non-diabetics have their FBS in between 75-85. Forget WHO and ADA. Go for Fasting blood sugar and fasting insulin tests and then compute your IR. No ADA/WHO trained professional ever will tell you this. They will push you to be a full blown diabetic with their advice. Diabetes is a flourishing business for the drug industry. They want more customers. Type 2 starts with over secretion of insulin, so first line of attack should be to bring that excess insulin down. Cutting down carbs helps like nothing else. Dont get lost with buzzword "diabetes" ...fasting bs ...fasting insulin...understand your body .... Fasting insulin is good and fasting bs is fair ...though not very good ...cut down carbs...everybody lose their beta cells diabetic or non diabetic ....if beta cells are lost beyond a threshold one is declared daibetic ...so forget about the buzzword "diabetes"... Cutting down carb will decrease the load on pancreas to keep up with load of carbs...and thus it will get chance to rest and recover its lost beta cells...eat atmost 3 meals a day and dont snack much ...as this will give rest to digestive system and lighten the load and give opportunity to recover They only have OPINIONS. And try to scare with wait and watch, see in future type statements. Devoid of any scientific backing and they don't like discussing science. Water = Vodka because both are colorless. That's their logic They will say wait and watch after 2 years, when 2 years is over they will say 5 years, and when 5 years is over they will say wait till death. All scare mongering o Continue reading >>

Introduction To Self-monitoring Blood Glucose

Introduction To Self-monitoring Blood Glucose

The tiny drop of blood you see on your test strip contains a wealth of information. You can use this to help you within the blood glucose target ranges recommended by your healthcare provider, as well as your own lifestyle goals.1 Blood sugar target ranges In general, the American Diabetes Association's (ADA) recommended blood sugar levels are: Between 80 and 130 mg/dL before meals2 Less than 180 mg/dL after meals2 Your range is yours alone—based on your health, age, level of activity and other factors. And remember that your target is a range you'd like to stay within, not a single number. But what if you're out of range? These results provide valuable information, too. You can review your numbers over time to find patterns in highs and lows. Then you can work with your healthcare team to make adjustments to your diabetes management plan that will bring you closer to your target range. Gaining insights from routine testing Day-to-day blood sugar checks—also known as routine testing—can give you a good idea of how you're doing at this moment, and they can be reviewed overall to see trends. They can help answer questions such as: Are your medications working as they should? How does the type or amount of food you eat affect your blood sugar? How does activity or stress affect your blood sugar? Your healthcare team will probably recommend a schedule of routine or daily testing to help you manage your blood sugar. Recognizing patterns with structured testing You can take self-monitoring a step further with structured testing—checking your blood sugar at specific times over a short period to see how the things you do may affect your blood sugar. For example, if you're interested in insights into your overall blood glucose control, you can identify patterns with the Continue reading >>

It’s Not Age, It’s Diabetes

It’s Not Age, It’s Diabetes

Clinical study offers free treatment for type 2 diabetes Share This Article: John Watson walked into his optometrist’s office expecting to leave with a new eyeglass prescription but walked out instead with an ultimatum: no new prescription until he was tested for diabetes. “I laughed and said ‘I don’t have diabetes, I’m just going blind,’” said Watson. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes, which affects more than 29 million Americans, are varied, ranging from genetics (a family history) to lifestyle (too much food, not enough exercise). Watson’s blood sugar was at 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). For the average person, normal glucose levels are under 100 mg/dL when fasting and less than 140 two hours after eating. Other symptoms of diabetes are harder to pin down: frequent urination, feeling very hungry, thirsty or tired, weight loss, cuts and bruises that heal slowly, tingling or numbness in hands or feet or blurry vision. Watson assumed his vision problems were a sign of advancing age, not a symptom of diabetes. He blames his condition on too many apple pies and cheeseburgers. When diagnosed he weighed 270 pounds. With the help of physicians, Watson controlled his blood sugar levels with diet and exercise. When his blood sugar levels dropped to 103 mg/dL— just three points above the normal marker — he decided to continue management of the disease on his own without medications. That’s when things got out of control. Type 2 diabetes typically begins with insulin resistance, when the body doesn't use insulin effectively to regulate blood glucose levels. To make up for higher than normal blood sugar levels, the pancreas produces more insulin to further lower blood glucose. Over time, the pancreas loses the ability to make sufficient insulin to kee Continue reading >>

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

In the next two articles we’re going to discuss the concept of “normal” blood sugar. I say concept and put normal in quotation marks because what passes for normal in mainstream medicine turns out to be anything but normal if optimal health and function are what you’re interested in. Here’s the thing. We’ve confused normal with common. Just because something is common, doesn’t mean it’s normal. It’s now becoming common for kids to be overweight and diabetic because they eat nothing but refined flour, high-fructose corn syrup and industrial seed oils. Yet I don’t think anyone (even the ADA) would argue that being fat and metabolically deranged is even remotely close to normal for kids. Or adults, for that matter. In the same way, the guidelines the so-called authorities like the ADA have set for normal blood sugar may be common, but they’re certainly not normal. Unless you think it’s normal for people to develop diabetic complications like neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular disease as they age, and spend the last several years of their lives in hospitals or assisted living facilities. Common, but not normal. In this article I’m going to introduce the three markers we use to measure blood sugar, and tell you what the conventional model thinks is normal for those markers. In the next article, I’m going to show you what the research says is normal for healthy people. And I’m also going to show you that so-called normal blood sugar, as dictated by the ADA, can double your risk of heart disease and lead to all kinds of complications down the road. The 3 ways blood sugar is measured Fasting blood glucose This is still the most common marker used in clinical settings, and is often the only one that gets tested. The fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Four Hours After Eating

Blood Glucose Four Hours After Eating

Cells throughout your body work around the clock, even when you’re sleeping. Clearly, they need a steady supply of energy to keep going. To function, they rely on glucose, a simple type of carbohydrate. Glucose enters your bloodstream until the hormone insulin comes around to help cells use or store the circulating glucose. Your blood sugar may go up a bit after eating, but if it’s still high four hours after your meal, or if it drops too low, something is awry in your body. Video of the Day Normally your blood sugar should remain between 70 and 130 milligrams per deciliter, according to the American Diabetes Association. This range is for any random time throughout the day, before or after meals. After a long fast, such as after a night’s sleep, it’s normal for your glucose to be on the lower end of that spectrum -- 70 to 100 milligrams per deciliter. Four Hours After Eating If you’re generally healthy or are properly managing your diabetes, your blood glucose should fall between 90 and 130 milligrams per deciliter four hours after eating. If you're not diabetic, your sugar could even go as high as 140 milligrams per deciliter after meals. Of course, if you are a diabetic, your blood glucose could rise even higher -- 180 milligrams per deciliter or above, even several hours after eating. It’s not typical for your glucose to remain elevated four hours after eating. By then, insulin should have done its job and made sure that all of that extra glucose was used up. So if your blood sugar is still high hours after eating, it could be a sign that you have diabetes. Or if you have already been diagnosed, the dosage of your insulin or other diabetes medication might be off. Elevated glucose can also stem from an infected pancreas, an overactive thyroid and certain Continue reading >>

High Blood Glucose Reading Four Hours After A Meal

High Blood Glucose Reading Four Hours After A Meal

An elevated blood glucose level after eating may indicate you have diabetes. If you haven't been diagnosed, see your health care provider. If you're already being monitored for diabetes, a high blood glucose level may occur from changes in your routine, illness or due to medications. Over time, a chronically elevated blood glucose level may lead to complications such as kidney disease, eye problems, heart attack and stroke. According to Joslin Diabetes Center, blood glucose is considered high when it's 160 milligrams per deciliter or greater. If two or more tests show your blood glucose is between 100 and 125 milligrams per deciliter four hours after a meal, also known as fasting blood sugar, you'll be diagnosed with prediabetes or impaired fasting glucose. Prediabetes puts you at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes and heart disease, according to Joslin Diabetes Center. If two or more tests show your blood glucose is greater than 126 four hours after a meal, you'll be diagnosed with diabetes. Making changes to your eating habits and exercise, oral prescriptions and insulin injections can all help lower your glucose levels four hours after eating. Changes in Your Routine If your blood glucose has been within normal range and has recently become elevated, examine any changes in your eating habits and exercise. Increasing your food intake, changing what you eat daily and eating too many high-carbohydrate or high-fat foods can cause fluctuation in your blood sugar. A decrease in physical activity may also cause an increase in your blood glucose. Track your food intake and exercise routine along with your blood glucose to identify any patterns that may be causing this increase. High blood glucose four hours after a meal may also be due to problems with your medication. If y Continue reading >>

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Here you'll find info about why blood sugar is high in the morning, along with tips and resources to lower those numbers! A while back I had a client sending me her blood sugar charts every few days and on those charts she always made some notes if she had questions. Every time she sent them through, I noticed she had 3 big question marks (???) against her morning blood sugar results. And on another morning when her morning blood sugar levels were high at 160 mg/dl (or 8.9 mmol/l). She had written: I don't understand. 97 mg/dl (or 5.5mmol/l) last night when I went to sleep. I didn't eat anything because I didn't feel well. Humm… I was also over in one of the online diabetes groups I'm involved in today and this message popped up. I'm struggling with my morning BS number. When I went to bed around 11PM my BS was 107. I'm waking up with my BS between 120 – 135. I did put two pieces of string cheese next to my bed and when I woke up around 3am, I ate one. Since I was told to eat protein at night. When I woke up 3 hours later my BS was 130. I didn't want to eat anything large since it's so close to 140 (my goal is to keep it below 140). So I had 1 piece of toast (sugar free wheat bread) and just a tiny bit of peanut butter. I checked it an hour later and it was 161! What am I doing wrong? Do these morning situations sound familiar to you? Are you constantly questioning: Why is blood sugar high in the morning? I mean, logically we'd think that it should be at it's lowest in the morning right? Well don't panic, there is a reason for it, so let's explore why morning blood sugar is often higher. And at the end, I'll also point you toward some resources to help you lower those levels. Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning? Although it would seem logical that your body would Continue reading >>

Chart For Blood Sugar Levels

Chart For Blood Sugar Levels

Glucose is our body's primary source of energy. During digestion, the carbohydrate-rich food items get converted into glucose, which is then absorbed into the bloodstream. The levels of blood glucose or blood sugar are regulated with the help of insulin. Insulin, which is a hormone that is secreted by the pancreas, facilitates the absorption of glucose by the cells and tissues of the body. Glucose is also stored by the liver or muscle cells as glycogen. It is normal for the sugar level to fluctuate throughout the day. Glucose levels are the lowest in the mornings, and mostly tend to rise for a couple of hours after meals, depending on the volume of carbohydrates consumed. The normal range of the blood sugar in the morning is about 70 to 100 mg/dL. Our body has an excellent mechanism to regulate blood sugar levels. Glucose that is stored in the liver as glycogen, gets reabsorbed in the bloodstream, when the sugar levels drop. Reference Range for Blood Sugar Normally, the blood sugar levels are tested on an empty stomach, usually after a gap of six to eight hours after having the last meal. This test is known as the fasting blood glucose test. The following chart provides the normal range for fasting blood sugar levels. Fasting Blood Sugar Levels Normal 70-100 mg/dL Prediabetes 101-125 mg/dL Diabetes 125 mg/dL and above The following table provides the average blood sugar levels of a normal healthy adult, 2 hours after eating a meal. Postprandial Blood Sugar Levels Normal 70-140 mg/dL Prediabetes 141-200 mg/dL Diabetes 200 mg/dL and above Note: As per the American Diabetes Association, for people with type 2 diabetes, the normal fasting blood sugar range is 70-130 mg/dL, whereas blood sugar levels after meals should be less than 180 mg/dL Blood Sugar Levels in Pregnant Wo Continue reading >>

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