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1000 Glucose Level In Urine

Urine Glucose Testing

Urine Glucose Testing

General concept Accuracy Limitations of urine test strips Barney's example (potentially fatal mistake) A little humor How urine glucose testing works Many vets recommend urine glucose testing as a method of monitoring your pet's diabetes at home. It is simple and inexpensive. But it has some serious limitations that must be understood and taken into consideration. Urine glucose testing is based on the fact that excessive amounts of glucose in the blood will be filtered by the kidneys into the urine. Once the amount of glucose in the blood exceeds the renal threshold (180 mg/dL) , glucose is spilled into the urine. The renal threshold is the level at the kidneys can not "process" any more blood glucose and it spills into the urine. If the blood glucose is high for an extended period of time, glucose is usually present in the urine. The amount of glucose present in the urine depends on how high the blood glucose was, and how long the blood glucose was high. Urine glucose test strips like the pictures shown below are used. The test strip has a little test area at the end that is dipped into urine or held in the urine stream. After a certain amount of time, the color of the test area is compared to a reference color chart. Bayer makes several types of urine tests strips. Diastix and Clinistix test only for urine glucose. Keto-Diastix test for both glucose and ketones. The Diastix have more "levels" of glucose measurement than the Clinistix. Follow the instructions that come with your test strips, and use the reference color chart on the bottle or box. The picture shown below is just an example - the colors are NOT to be used to compare your urine test strip. The color chart tells you approximately how much glucose has spilled into your pet's urine. Note: Different test stri Continue reading >>

Urine Glucose Test

Urine Glucose Test

What Is a Urine Glucose Test? A urine glucose test is a quick and simple way to check for abnormally high levels of glucose in the urine. Glucose is a type of sugar that your body requires and uses for energy. Your body converts the carbohydrates you eat into glucose. Having too much glucose in your body can be a sign of a health problem. If you don’t receive treatment and your glucose levels remain high, you can develop serious complications. The test involves taking a sample of urine. Once you provide your sample, a small cardboard device known as a dipstick will measure your glucose levels. The dipstick will change color depending on the amount of glucose in your urine. If you have a moderate or high amount of glucose in your urine, your doctor will perform further testing to determine the underlying cause. The most common cause of elevated glucose levels is diabetes, a condition that affects the body’s ability to manage glucose levels. It’s important to monitor your glucose levels if you have already been diagnosed with diabetes, or if you show symptoms of prediabetes. These symptoms include excessive thirst, blurred vision, and fatigue. When left untreated, diabetes can lead to long-term complications, including kidney failure and nerve damage. A urine glucose test is often performed to check for diabetes. In addition, known diabetics can use the urine glucose test as a way of monitoring the degree of sugar control, or efficacy of treatments. Urine tests were once the main type of testing used to measure glucose levels in people who may have diabetes. However, they are far less common now that blood tests have become more accurate and easier to use. In some cases, a urine glucose test may also be done to check for kidney problems or a urinary tract infection. Continue reading >>

Top 30 Doctor Insights On: 100 Mg Glucose In Urine

Top 30 Doctor Insights On: 100 Mg Glucose In Urine

2 Not necessarily: Sounds like a urine dipstick was used. Not the preferred method of measuring glucose in the urine. Independent of this- pregnancy cannot be diagnosed or predicted using this data. You will need to wait until you have missed your next period. If that happens you may test for pregnancy though I recommend waiting 1 extra week since you may simply ...Read more Continue reading >>

Clinlab Navigator Information

Clinlab Navigator Information

Urinalysis begins with a macroscopic examination of the urine which describes the color and clarity of the urine. In healthy individuals urine color ranges from pale yellow to amber, depending on their state of hydration. Many factors affect urine color including fluid balance, diet, medications and disease. The following table includes a list of the most common causes of abnormal urine coloration. Color Pathologic Causes Food & Drug Causes Cloudy white Phosphorus, pyuria, chyluria, lipiduria, hyperoxaluria, uricosuria Diet high in purine-rich foods causing uricosuria, propofol, hypercalciuria, phosphaturia Brown Bile pigments, myoglobin, hemolytic anemia, porphyria Fava beans, rhubarb, Levodopa, metronidazole (Flagyl), nitrofurantoin, anti-malarial drugs, acetaminophen overdose Brownish-Black Bile pigments, melanin, methemoglobin, alcaptonuria, porphyria levodopa, methyldopa, Senna, Cascara, iron, methocarbamol, metronidazole, nitrofurantoin, sorbitol Green or Blue Pseudomonas UTI, biliverdin, Hartnup disease, herbicide poisoning Amitriptyline, indigo, carmine, IV cimetidine (Tagamet), IV promethazine (Phenergan), methylene blue, triamterene (Dyrenium), indomethacin, methocarbamol, metoclopramide, propofol, Zaleplon Orange Bile pigments, urinary tract infection Phenothiazines, phenazopyridine (Pyridium), isoniazid, sulfasalazine, riboflavin Red Hematuria, hemoglobinuria, myoglobinuria, porphyria Beets, blackberries, rhubarb, Phenolphthalein, phenoazopyridine, rifampin, chloroquine, deferoxamine, hydroxycobalamin, warfarin Yellow Concentrated urine Carrots, Cascara Purple Urine bag syndrome due to gram negative bacteruria Aycock RD and Kass DA, Abnormal Urine Color. Southern Med J. 2012;105:43-37. Dipstick Testing Urine samples are initially screened with dipsticks. Per Continue reading >>

Complications

Complications

Low and high blood glucose levels Fluctuating blood glucose levels in the form of mild hypoglycaemic episodes and slightly elevated blood glucose values are constant companions during insulin therapy. However, in order to prevent hypoglycaemic emergencies in a timely manner, it is important to be aware of your symptoms and treatment options. Hypoglycaemia – Low blood glucose Preventing hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) is the greatest challenge to achieving the most physiologically normal blood glucose levels possible (like those of non-diabetics). It must be borne in mind here that a hypoglycaemic emergency can develop very quickly, within just a few minutes. If there is more insulin in the blood than is necessary in order to regulate the blood glucose value, then the blood glucose level will drop. A hypoglycaemic episode is considered an emergency starting at a value of 50 mg/dL (2.8 mmol/L). Initial signs usually appear in advance, including Trembling Sweating Heart palpitations Sudden ravenous hunger Weakness Restlessness At the first sign of a hypoglycaemic episode and/or if blood glucose levels drop below 65 mg/dL (3.6 mmol/L) a rapid response is vital in order to prevent blood glucose levels from dropping even further. Always remember to remain calm and eat something first before you measure your blood glucose. Immediately consume some form of fast-acting sugar (20 g carbohydrates), such as glucose (available in tablet, liquid or chewable tablet form). Alternatively, consume a sweetened drink, such as orange juice or cola (100 mL = approx. 10 g carbohydrates). Measure your blood glucose level and then measure it again in 15 minutes. Then consume some long-acting carbohydrates, such as whole grain bread, bananas or yogurt to ensure that your blood glucose level Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Urine Glucose And Blood Glucose?

What Is The Difference Between Urine Glucose And Blood Glucose?

Glucose is a simple sugar that exists in many types of food and in your blood. It serves many functions, the most important of which is as an energy source. Your body has sensitive systems for keeping the glucose in your blood within a normal range. However, in conditions such as diabetes, blood glucose levels can become elevated, causing glucose to spill out into your urine. In pregnancy, glucose may appear in the urine, although the blood glucose level is typically normal. Video of the Day Glucose is a simple carbohydrate, and many dietary sources exist. In fact, glucose is present in nearly all foods that contain carbohydrates. Glucose can be present on its own, or paired with fructose to form the two-sugar molecule sucrose, also known as table sugar. Other sources of glucose include fruits and vegetables. Grains, legumes, nuts and seeds contain large molecules of glucose known as starch. Sweeteners such as maple syrup, honey, high-fructose corn syrup and molasses also contain abundant quantities of glucose. Animal products such as fish, being carbohydrate-free, do not contain glucose. The major function of glucose is to provide energy to your cells. Once it is broken down in your small intestine, it is absorbed into the bloodstream, where it travels throughout your body and can enter the cells of every major organ. Within your cells, glucose undergoes chemical reactions called glycolysis and the Krebs Cycle, in which it is broken down and combined with oxygen to produce ATP, the energy currency of your body. ATP, or adenosine triphosphate, helps your body undergo chemical reactions such as building new proteins and recycling old cells. The normal range for blood glucose is from 70 to 115 mg/dL, according to “Maxwell Quick Medical Reference.” To keep the glucose Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

Hyperglycemia in Dogs A dog with abnormally high levels of glucose in the blood is said to have hyperglycemia. A simple carbohydrate sugar that circulates in the blood, glucose is a major source of energy for the body, of which normal levels range between 75-120mg. Insulin, a hormone that is produced and released by the pancreas into the bloodstream when glucose levels rise, plays a key role in maintaining normal sugar levels. Low levels or absolute deficiency of insulin results in abnormally high blood sugar levels. Some of the causes for hyperglycemia may be pancreatitis, and the resulting inability to produce insulin; normally occurring hormones, especially in female dogs; diet; and infections of the body (such as teeth, or urinary tract). Middle aged and older dogs are more at risk for developing hyperglycemia, and it is more common in female dogs than in males. Any breed can be affected, but some smaller breeds appear to be more disposed, including beagles, cairn terriers, dachshunds, miniature poodles and schnauzers. Symptoms and Types Clinical symptoms may vary depending on the underlying disease/condition. Your dog may not be showing any serious symptoms, especially those if the increased sugar is thought to be temporary, hormonal, or stress induced hyperglycemia. Some of the more common symptoms include: Depression Weight loss Excessive hunger Dehydration Bloodshot eyes (due to inflamed blood vessels) Liver enlargement Nerve damage in legs Severe depression (in cases of very high blood sugar levels) Non-healing wounds;infection is increased as the excess sugar feeds fungal and bacterial invaders Tissue damage (due to oxidizing [burning] effect of the excess sugar in the tissue) Causes Other than high stress situations, harmful drug interactions (such as with he Continue reading >>

Urine Glucose Test

Urine Glucose Test

Test for glycosuria, the excretion of glucose in the urine. The test for urine glucose uses a small dipstick that changes color after it has been dipped in urine. Matching the color on the dipstick against a chart on the test package reveals whether there is glucose in the urine. Before people with diabetes started measuring blood glucose levels, urine glucose testing was the best way to monitor diabetes control. Some people still use urine glucose tests, but these tests are of dubious value in monitoring diabetes control for two reasons. First, the renal threshold — the blood glucose level at which the kidneys begin to excrete glucose in the urine — is relatively high. In healthy, nondiabetic individuals, the average renal threshold is at a blood glucose level of 160–180 mg/dl. In other words, only when the blood glucose level reaches 160–180 mg/dl will some glucose appear in the urine. Many people with diabetes have an even higher renal threshold, so glucose will not appear in their urine until blood glucose levels are very high — well above the normal range. Thus, a positive urine glucose test would indicate that the blood glucose level is very high, and a negative urine glucose test could mean that the level is low, normal, or slightly elevated. The second factor that limits the value of this test is that urine can remain in the bladder for several hours, which means that a positive urine glucose test may actually reflect a high blood glucose level from several hours ago, even if the current blood glucose level is actually normal. Continue reading >>

Glycosuria

Glycosuria

Glycosuria or glucosuria is the excretion of glucose into the urine. Ordinarily, urine contains no glucose because the kidneys are able to reabsorb all of the filtered glucose from the tubular fluid back into the bloodstream. Glycosuria is nearly always caused by elevated blood glucose levels, most commonly due to untreated diabetes mellitus. Rarely, glycosuria is due to an intrinsic problem with glucose reabsorption within the kidneys (such as Fanconi syndrome), producing a condition termed renal glycosuria.[1] Glycosuria leads to excessive water loss into the urine with resultant dehydration, a process called osmotic diuresis. Alimentary glycosuria is a temporary condition, when a high amount of carbohydrate is taken, it is rapidly absorbed in some cases where a part of the stomach is surgically removed, the excessive glucose appears in urine producing glucosuria. Pathophysiology[edit] Blood is filtered by millions of nephrons, the functional units that comprise the kidneys. In each nephron, blood flows from the arteriole into the glomerulus, a tuft of leaky capillaries. The Bowman's capsule surrounds each glomerulus, and collects the filtrate that the glomerulus forms. The filtrate contains waste products (e.g. urea), electrolytes (e.g. sodium, potassium, chloride), amino acids, and glucose. The filtrate passes into the renal tubules of the kidney. In the first part of the renal tubule, the proximal tubule, glucose is reabsorbed from the filtrate, across the tubular epithelium and into the bloodstream. The proximal tubule can only reabsorb a limited amount of glucose. When the blood glucose level exceeds about 160 – 180 mg/dl, the proximal tubule becomes overwhelmed and begins to excrete glucose in the urine. Approximate correlation between dipstick designation and Continue reading >>

Sugar In Urine

Sugar In Urine

What is sugar in urine? Sugar (glucose) is usually present in the urine at very low levels or not at all. Abnormally high amounts of sugar in the urine, known as glycosuria, are usually the result of high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar usually occurs in diabetes, especially when untreated. Normally, when blood is filtered in the kidneys, some sugar remains in the fluid that will later become urine. If the level of blood sugar is low, as is normally the case, the body can reabsorb the sugar from this fluid before it leaves the kidney to be excreted as urine. When the blood sugar is high, there is too much sugar in the fluid leaving the kidney to be reabsorbed, so some sugar passes into the urine. Sugar in the urine can be detected in the laboratory or is easy to detect at home with a urine dipstick test. Because sugar in the urine is associated with high blood sugar and diabetes, it is important to consult a physician if you suspect you have sugar in your urine. Sugar in the urine is often accompanied by other symptoms of diabetes, including fatigue, unexplained weight loss, excessive thirst or hunger, and frequent urination. Seek immediate medical care (call 911) if you have sugar in the urine along with more serious symptoms, including the inability to think clearly. Seek prompt medical care if your sugar in the urine is persistent or causes you concern. Continue reading >>

What Do Urine Tests Say About Diabetes?

What Do Urine Tests Say About Diabetes?

When you have diabetes, you’re no stranger to tests that keep track of your disease. Most look at your blood, but there are others. Two simple ones that check your urine can help you and your doctor watch for kidney disease and severe high blood sugar. About one-third of people with diabetes have problems with their kidneys. But early and tight control of your blood sugar and blood pressure, plus help from certain medications, can keep these organs working like they should To check for problems, your doctor can do a test that measures the amount of protein in your urine, called microalbuminuria. It shows up when small amounts of albumin (the main protein in your blood) seep into your pee. Without treatment to slow the leak, your kidneys could be damaged and eventually fail. You should get this test every year starting as soon as you’re diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. That’s because high blood sugar is usually present many years before you find out you have the disease. If you have type 1 diabetes, you probably won’t get the test until you’ve been diagnosed for 5 years. If the test is positive, it means your kidneys can no longer filter the blood as well as they should. It also shows you have blood vessel disease that could lead to heart problems. Your doctor will probably suggest medications or lifestyle changes to help prevent these conditions: Kidney damage. You may start specific medicines to prevent further harm. If your microalbumin level is high, your doctor may suggest another type of test that requires you to collect samples for 24 hours. This can better tell the extent of damage to the organs and see how well they’re working. High blood sugar. Studies show tight control of your blood sugar can lower kidney damage, so your doctor may put you on more Continue reading >>

Metrowest Veterinary Associates, Inc.

Metrowest Veterinary Associates, Inc.

METROWEST VETERINARY ASSOCIATES, INC. 207 EAST MAIN STREET, MILFORD, MA 01757 (508) 478-7300 online @ www.mvavet.com Page 1 of 2 DIABETES: MONITORING URINE WITH KETO-DIASTIX The overall goal of treatment is to keep the pet’s blood sugar levels within the normal range for as much of the day as possible. This is accomplished primarily through the daily administration of insulin by injection to make up for the insulin that the animal’s body is not producing on its own. When giving insulin, we must monitor the pet to tell when the insulin dose needs adjustment. While this may be accomplished with more accuracy by measuring blood sugar levels, for many it is more feasible to monitor the urine, using Keto-diastix to decide how and when to adjust the dose. Below are guidelines to help you: Keto-diastix can be purchased at most pharmacies. Make sure to get the specific product, which tests urine (not blood) for both glucose and ketones. Specific step by step instructions are presented on the back of this page. Collecting sample: At the time of testing, use a small dish to collect some urine. Only a small amount is needed. For cats, a urine collection kit may be used (in place of litter) to collect urine. The best way to get a sample may be by holding the keto-diastix in the urine stream while your pet is urinating, but if he/she has urinated on the floor, the keto-diastix may be placed directly into the urine to obtain a sample. Make sure that urine covers both squares on the stick. Reading the sample: � As soon as you collect the sample on the stick, start counting seconds. � The KETONE square should be read after 15 seconds. Compare the color of the square to the colors on the bottle’s ketone chart, choosing the one that most closely matches the Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Test

Nearly 1 in 10 women will develop gestational diabetes (GD or GDM) during pregnancy — which is why almost all practitioners screen for it in all their patients. Fortunately, gestational diabetes is also one of the most easily managed pregnancy complications. When blood sugar is closely controlled through diet, exercise and, if necessary, medication, women with gestational diabetes are likely to have perfectly normal pregnancies and healthy babies. When a glucose screening is done The glucose screen is usually done between week 24 of pregnancy and week 28 of pregnancy. Some practitioners may test earlier if you're at higher risk for the disorder, including if you're obese, 35 or older, have a family history of diabetes or had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy. How a glucose screening is done The glucose screening is simple, especially if you have a sweet tooth. First, you'll drink a very sweet glucose (aka sugar) drink, which usually tastes like flat orange soda. Then you'll wait for one hour before having some blood drawn and tested for glucose. Most women chug the stuff with no problem and no side effects; a few, especially those who don't have a taste for sweet liquids, feel a little queasy afterwards. How a glucose tolerance test is done If the results of your glucose screening show elevated levels of glucose in your blood, it's possible that you might not be producing enough insulin to process the extra glucose in your system. Your doctor may then order a glucose tolerance test. For this diagnostic test, you'll be asked to fast overnight. Your blood will be drawn in the morning, and then you'll drink a higher-concentration glucose mixture. Your blood will be drawn three more times, at one, two, and three hours later. If a glucose tolerance test diagnose Continue reading >>

Glycosuria (glucose In Urine) Symptoms, Causes, And Potential Complications

Glycosuria (glucose In Urine) Symptoms, Causes, And Potential Complications

Glycosuria, or glucose in the urine, is the presence of higher than normal levels of sugar in the urine and may be due to complications with your kidneys or diabetes. To learn more about this condition, including symptoms, causes, and prevention strategies, as well as what normal and abnormal levels of glucose in the urine are, continue reading. Glycosuria symptoms Glycosuria may occur with a host of other symptoms, including excessive hunger, fatigue, infections, frequent urination, irritability, increased thirst, issues with vision, slower healing of wounds, tingling sensation in hands and feet, unexplained weight loss, abdominal pain, and in some cases, high blood sugar levels. Difference between blood glucose and glucose in urine Blood glucose is regulated by insulin produced by the pancreas, though in patients with diabetes, the insulin is not produced or processed properly meaning they may need insulin injections to regulate their blood sugar. If left unmanaged, diabetes can cause blood glucose levels to rise and some may enter into the urine. Urine glucose may not always be due to diabetes, and can be a benign symptom that sometimes accompanies pregnancy. Glucose in urine causes Some of the most common causes of glucose in the urine include: Diabetes mellitus: The excess blood glucose levels of people with unmanaged diabetes make it difficult for your kidneys to properly reabsorb the glucose and can cause it to leak into the urine. Hyperthyroidism: Excessive thyroid hormones can cause decreased absorption of glucose that is then passed out of the body through the urine. High sugar diet: Consuming excessive sugar can raise your blood glucose past the level that your kidneys can properly reabsorb, which causes some glucose to be passed into the urine. Benign glycos Continue reading >>

Ketosis-prone Type 2 Diabetes Differential Diagnoses

Ketosis-prone Type 2 Diabetes Differential Diagnoses

Diagnostic Considerations The main differential diagnostic consideration when DKA is considered is a hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS). The main metabolic differences between HHS and DKA are the extreme elevations of glucose seen in HHS and the lack of significant ketoacidosis. Although overlap is observed, glucose levels tend to be higher in HHS than in DKA. Levels of more than 1000 mg/dL are not uncommon, and levels are almost always more than 600 mg/dL. In DKA, glucose levels are typically between 500-800 mg/dL and seldom exceed 900 mg/dL. Of greater differentiating value are acidosis and ketonemia. Metabolic acidosis is absent or mild with HHS and if present, ketonemia is mild. Anion gap is normal or minimally elevated in HHS. In contrast, the triad of hyperglycemia, elevated anion gap acidosis, and ketonemia is expected in DKA. Clinically, patients with HHS are much more likely to have altered mental status than patients with DKA. Altered mental status in HHS is related to the degree of effective plasma osmolality elevation. Effective plasma osmolality can be calculated using the formula below. Values of more than approximately 320 mosmol/kg are usually seen in HHS. Both DKA and HHS are known stroke mimics because they may be associated with focal neurologic findings. The formula is as follows: Another cause of ketoacidosis is alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis in an alcoholic without significant hyperglycemia is diagnostic of this state. It is seen in chronic alcoholics who are malnourished. In the right setting, toxic alcohol (eg, methanol, ethylene glycol) ingestion may be considered. Poisoning with toxic alcohols also causes an elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis with altered mental status. For additional discussion of toxic alcohol poisoning see Metha Continue reading >>

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