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Lchf Diet Without Ketosis

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A Comprehensive Beginner's Guide

What is a Keto Diet? A keto diet is well known for being a low carb diet, where the body produces ketones in the liver to be used as energy. It’s referred to as many different names – ketogenic diet, low carb diet, low carb high fat (LCHF), etc. When you eat something high in carbs, your body will produce glucose and insulin. Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert and use as energy so that it will be chosen over any other energy source. Insulin is produced to process the glucose in your bloodstream by taking it around the body. Since the glucose is being used as a primary energy, your fats are not needed and are therefore stored. Typically on a normal, higher carbohydrate diet, the body will use glucose as the main form of energy. By lowering the intake of carbs, the body is induced into a state known as ketosis. Ketosis is a natural process the body initiates to help us survive when food intake is low. During this state, we produce ketones, which are produced from the breakdown of fats in the liver. The end goal of a properly maintained keto diet is to force your body into this metabolic state. We don’t do this through starvation of calories but starvation Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. WhoAteMyPsyche

    I've been trying to find the science between how the body reacts in ketosis vs someone who just tries to keep their carbs low. I know some people can be in ketosis with 50 carbs or less, but I do not think that is the case for most people.
    When I first started losing weight I was keeping my carbs between 40-50, and lost between 80-90 lbs. doing that. I then started doing more research (I stalled for a long time) and switched to keto and keep my carbs below 20. However, I'm working on a blog post trying to explain keto and would like to be able to explain, intelligently, the difference in ketosis vs "lowish" carbs.

    Can anyone point me to good research on this? Thank you!

  2. Fiorella

    Honestly, I think the best data or research is testing your own body, as in n=1. Starting at 20 g carbs is a starter's template. From there, you may need to go lower, or get away with pushing it higher. Let's say someone comes up with a bell curve showing where people have there carbs set at. It will still be a snapshot in time, possibly skewed to men/women only, age groups, metabolic diseases, athletic/sedentary, etc. Also, some people noticed that with time, the carb level requirement changed as their bodies health modified, too.

  3. WhoAteMyPsyche

    I completely agree that everyone is different and that the carb levels can change over time. I know, at least in my experience, just because someone knows about low carb doesn't mean they know what ketosis is. When I first started I was going off a plan I had followed in the 90s (Protein Power Plan) and knew nothing about ketosis. I had heard the term "keto" thrown around by a few people but just thought it was a different way of saying the same thing - Protein Power, Atkins, etc. So I guess the key is telling people WHAT keto is and why lowering your carbs works. They can then take that info and learn for themselves what works for them.

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