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What Is Partially Compensated Metabolic Acidosis?

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Base Excess

In physiology, base excess and base deficit refer to an excess or deficit, respectively, in the amount of base present in the blood. The value is usually reported as a concentration in units of mEq/L, with positive numbers indicating an excess of base and negative a deficit. A typical reference range for base excess is −2 to +2 mEq/L.[1] Comparison of the base excess with the reference range assists in determining whether an acid/base disturbance is caused by a respiratory, metabolic, or mixed metabolic/respiratory problem. While carbon dioxide defines the respiratory component of acid-base balance, base excess defines the metabolic component. Accordingly, measurement of base excess is defined, under a standardized pressure of carbon dioxide, by titrating back to a standardized blood pH of 7.40. The predominant base contributing to base excess is bicarbonate. Thus, a deviation of serum bicarbonate from the reference range is ordinarily mirrored by a deviation in base excess. However, base excess is a more comprehensive measurement, encompassing all metabolic contributions. Definition[edit] Pathophysiology sample values BMP/ELECTROLYTES: Na+ = 140 Cl− = 100 BUN = 20 / Glu = 150 Continue reading >>

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  1. 13nay

    Hi all, first post here. I've been LCHF for a few weeks now, and the idea that we perhaps need to reduce the amount of fat that we are actually consuming has been told to me, so that our body actually uses the fat we have stored as it's fuel rather than all of that good fat that we are consuming first and foremost. My macros are showing my carbs as being below 20 everyday, and my fat is usually sky high also because I like to flavour my foods with cheeses and butter, but don't feel that any weight has actually been shifted (even though yes I understand that I may need to wait for this to happen).

    So I'm just wondering is when is there actually too much fat in our diet? Do I need to pull back on the added fats to my meals if I want to try and shift some weight?










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    Does Eating Extra Fat Make You Fat? - Diet Doctor dietdoctor.com

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qk0U006YZ2w

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    2 Keto Dudes - Ketogenic Lifestyle Podcast 2KetoDudes.com

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    2 Keto Dudes - Ketogenic Lifestyle Podcast 2ketodudes.com


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    Volatile Biomarkers: Non-Invasive Diagnosis in Physiology and Medicine - Google Books google.com.au





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  2. Fiorella

    Hi Renee...welcome to the forum
    It looks like you have a great start!
    The concept behind keto is that you eat to fat to satiety. So, that eliminate the need to track and limit fat.
    Since your goal is to lose weight, you are doing the right thing by starting out with keeping your carbs at 20 gram limit. The other thing is to keep your protein levels moderate, too. The general amount is to eat 1 gram protein per kg of lean body mass. This means that you need to find out what your lean body mass is -- have you figured out what that is yet? And then with fat there is no limit...you can eat fat to satiety.
    If you provide us with a list of your typical daily meals and snacks, we can help you further with more advice.

    Hope this helps!

  3. Sascha_Heid

    If you want to loose fat you need to burn it. You do that by cutting carbs to get into ketosis, by cutting fat to use up your body-fat and by exercise to increase your number of mitochondria (which have a limited ability to burn fat thus you need as many as possibly).

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