diabetestalk.net

What Is Dka Type 1?

Share on facebook

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Clinical And Biochemical Differences.

Abstract BACKGROUND: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), once thought to typify type 1 diabetes mellitus, has been reported to affect individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An analysis and overview of the different clinical and biochemical characteristics of DKA that might be predicted between patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes is needed. METHODS: We reviewed 176 admissions of patients with moderate-to-severe DKA. Patients were classified as having type 1 or type 2 diabetes based on treatment history and/or autoantibody status. Groups were compared for differences in symptoms, precipitants, vital statistics, biochemical profiles at presentation, and response to therapy. RESULTS: Of 138 patients admitted for moderate-to-severe DKA, 30 had type 2 diabetes. A greater proportion of the type 2 diabetes group was Latino American or African American (P<.001). Thirty-five admissions (19.9%) were for newly diagnosed diabetes. A total of 85% of all admissions involved discontinuation of medication use, 69.2% in the type 2 group. Infections were present in 21.6% of the type 1 and 48.4% of the type 2 diabetes admissions. A total of 21% of patients with type 1 diabetes and 70% with type 2 di Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Steve Rapaport

    Correlation isn't causation, so the question's presupposition of high blood sugar 'resulting' in diabetic coma is wrong. They both result from common causes.
    Diabetic coma (advanced diabetic ketoacidosis or DKA) is not the result of high blood sugar, but of low insulin and water levels. Low insulin levels lead to high blood sugar AND to ketoacidosis. Hence there's no minimum blood sugar level to watch for (though there may be for a given individual).
    The best way to avoid DKA is to keep insulin levels steady in the bloodstream, keep well hydrated, and keep small amounts of food in the system at all times.
    DKA is a result of the body demanding sugar for fuel, and being denied it through lack of insulin. The body burns fat instead, which produces ketone bodies as a byproduct. The ketones build up in blood, making it acid and highly concentrated. Concentrated blood sucks water out of cells by osmosis. Dehydration makes this worse. The ketones signal the liver that glucose is desperately needed, so it dumps stored glucose to help out, but in the absence of insulin this just makes things worse -- now the blood is full of ketones AND glucose, and even more highly concentrated. Both of these conditions will get worse until fast-acting insulin and missing electrolytes are added in carefully controlled doses, including a drip-feed for hydration and frequent recheck and adjustment of all those values.

  2. Suhail Malhotra

    First we must know that there are 2 types of diabetes.
    IDDM(insulin dependent diabetes mellitus) aka Type 1
    NIDDM( non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus) aka Type 2.
    Type 1 is due to loss of insulin secretion by pancreas as in destruction of pancreas.
    Type 2 is due to insulin resistance that is insulin secretion is ok but body cells don't respond to it.
    Now the comas in these two types are different to the extent that they are named differently.
    The coma of type 1 is called the DKA(diabetic ketoacidosis) and that of type 2 is HONK( hyperosmotic non ketotic coma) now known as HHS(hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state).
    DKA occurs in type 1 diabetes or situations simulating type 1 mechanism like when a patient forgets to take his dose of insulin or in states when patient is regular with insulin but the body needs more than normal as in cases of surgery or illness or pregnancy.
    Blood glucose ranges in DKA from 250 to 600 mg/dl( 13 to 33 mmol/l) with increased ketones in blood which being acidic drive the blood ph to acidic levels ( <7.3). Symptoms include vomiting,increased urination, increased thirst, abdominal pain,increased rate of respiration(Kussumaul breathing) and in the end coma.
    HONK or HHS is caused by type 2 diabetes or situations similar to it like relative insulin deficiency combined with inadequate fluid intake and often precipitated in patients with type2 DM and a concurrent illness.
    Blood glucose ranges from 600 to 1200 mg/dl (33 to 66 mmol/l). The blood ph is normal (>=7.3) as ketones are absent. Patient is lethargic with increased thirst and increased urination leading to coma.
    Symptoms absent in HONK are nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and increased rate of respiration which were very much a part of DKA.

  3. Jae Won Joh

    If you are asking what blood sugar levels are commonly seen in diabetic coma[1], there is a very wide range. Patients naive to the condition typically present with blood glucoses around the 300s, while those with chronic poorly-managed diabetes can present with blood glucoses over 1000.
    [1] As Steve Rapaport already pointed out in his answer, the high glucose level is not, in and of itself, the problem.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

Related Articles

Popular Articles

More in ketosis