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What Are The Symptoms Of Ketoacidosis

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Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. gear2d

    Could anyone explain how this occurs? From my understanding high glucose levels draws K+ out of cells (HypERkalemia), low insulin promotes less shift of K+ in to cells (HypERkalemia), and acidosis causes K+ to shift out of cells (hypERkalemia)....so how does DKA cause hyPOkalemia? From my understanding DK:
    High glucose (hypertonicity which cause the shift of K+ to ECF),
    Low insulin
    Low pH

  2. blade

    USMLE Forums Guru

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gear2d
    Could anyone explain how this occurs? From my understanding high glucose levels draws K+ out of cells (HypERkalemia), low insulin promotes less shift of K+ in to cells (HypERkalemia), and acidosis causes K+ to shift out of cells (hypERkalemia)....so how does DKA cause hyPOkalemia? From my understanding DK:
    High glucose (hypertonicity which cause the shift of K+ to ECF),
    Low insulin
    Low pH Hypokalemia in DKA???which book is that pls?your analysis above is correct but
    In DKA=hyperkalemia but with low intracellular K+ hence in treatment of DKA,you treat as if hypokalemia to restore the intracellular loss

  3. gear2d

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by blade
    Hypokalemia in DKA???which book is that pls?your analysis above is correct but
    In DKA=hyperkalemia but with low intracellular K+ hence in treatment of DKA,you treat as if hypokalemia to restore the intracellular loss This is from Step to Med 3rd ed on page312 in the flow diagram.

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