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Respiratory Acidosis Sepsis

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Lactic Acidosis

Background In basic terms, lactic acid is the normal endpoint of the anaerobic breakdown of glucose in the tissues. The lactate exits the cells and is transported to the liver, where it is oxidized back to pyruvate and ultimately converted to glucose via the Cori cycle. In the setting of decreased tissue oxygenation, lactic acid is produced as the anaerobic cycle is utilized for energy production. With a persistent oxygen debt and overwhelming of the body's buffering abilities (whether from chronic dysfunction or excessive production), lactic acidosis ensues. [1, 2] (See Etiology.) Lactic acid exists in 2 optical isomeric forms, L-lactate and D-lactate. L-lactate is the most commonly measured level, as it is the only form produced in human metabolism. Its excess represents increased anaerobic metabolism due to tissue hypoperfusion. (See Workup.) D-lactate is a byproduct of bacterial metabolism and may accumulate in patients with short-gut syndrome or in those with a history of gastric bypass or small-bowel resection. [3] By the turn of the 20th century, many physicians recognized that patients who are critically ill could exhibit metabolic acidosis unaccompanied by elevation of ket Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. connie7

    I used to use the ketostix every morning -- was in moderate zone most days. After a while I stopped checking. That was about 2 months ago. Last week, I took my daughter to college orientation session, and had some chicken nuggets at Chik-Fil-A (my only cheat in about 6 months), so when I got home I decided to check. The result was negative ketones, so I tried to go back to induction levels for a few days. It's been a week, and they still register negative every morning. Could the sticks have "gone bad"? The scale is not changing too much -- the normal fluctuations, but nothing dramatic. Should I go out and get some more ketostix, or just stick with it and not worry so much?

  2. hayes

    The sticks have a 6month shelf life after opening. The least little moisture inside the bottle can effect the reading also as can other conditions.
    If your very curious, get a new bottle.
    Remember that some people never make the sticks change color.

  3. omgtwins

    Because Ketosis stix don't really do much when it comes to encouragment - I don't use them. There are way too many variables - you could be in ketosis and it may not show, you are'nt in ketosis but loosing weight...IMNSHO I stick to the scale once a week and the measurements every month - the clothes in the back of the closet that are slowly moving up are also better indicators. You know what you're eating - good or bad, so save some money and get rid of those sticks!

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