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What Do You Know About Prediabetes?

Take this quiz to find out how to cut your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Medical Reviewers: Dozier, Tennille, RN, BSN, RDMS Hurd, Robert, MD Continue reading >>

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  1. energy

    Non-diabetic A1C, fasting BS and +1hr and +2hrs and +3hrs postmeal values

    I am wondering what are the consensus numbers of a NORMAL (non-diabetic) person for:
    1) A1C (range)
    2) Fasting Blood Sugar (range)
    3) +1hour, +2hours and +3hours post meal values
    It seems like these values are moving target and therefore, it is frustrating to see numbers all over. What do you hear and believe what these values are supposed to be?

  2. smorgan

    Originally Posted by energy
    I am wondering what are the consensus numbers of a NORMAL (non-diabetic) person for:
    1) A1C (range)
    2) Fasting Blood Sugar (range)
    3) +1hour, +2hours and +3hours post meal values
    It seems like these values are moving target and therefore, it is frustrating to see numbers all over. What do you hear and believe what these values are supposed to be? You're looking for CONCENSUS on diabetes? You'd have better luck in Egypt!
    Anyway, the following are pretty widely accepted:
    1) A1C (range): 4.5 - 5.8 (used to be 6.0 or even 6.5)
    2) Fasting Blood Sugar (range): 60 - 99 (the next 20 points or so are sometimes called "pre-")
    3) +1hour, +2hours and +3hours post meal values: 140, 120, haven't heard, respectively
    As to after-meal numbers, some still say anything below 180 is "normal". Some non-diabetics do indeed reach the 160s after a meal (avg at about 45 minutes). One interesting about 180 is that it is an actual biological boundary - it is where your kidneys begin dumping glucose into your urine. The rest are pure speculation or averaging of data.
    Blood sugar is only a symptom of diabetes and not the disease itself. As such, such "boundaries" cannot be established with precision and no set of BG numbers can guarantee that your diabetes is truly "controlled" and will not progress or introduce complications. There are too many cases of heavy complications with excellent numbers and vice-versa for this to be tenable. It is an indirect measure. Until we learn what we SHOULD be measuring and get the equipment to do so, this is the best we have.

  3. ArtV

    Non-Diabetic normals can be anything, literally. The general guidelines are A1c under 6, FBG 70-100 or even less. Recovery 140-120-100. This varies so wildly (and widely) that getting a consensus might be Quixotian. The real distinction comes when it big D falls, before that, in a normal person, it doesn't much matter, although longer recovery times do in most circumstances pre-indicate diabetes.
    Art

    Originally Posted by energy
    I am wondering what are the consensus numbers of a NORMAL (non-diabetic) person for:
    1) A1C (range)
    2) Fasting Blood Sugar (range)
    3) +1hour, +2hours and +3hours post meal values
    It seems like these values are moving target and therefore, it is frustrating to see numbers all over. What do you hear and believe what these values are supposed to be?

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