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What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

If you’ve just started a ketogenic diet, then you’ll know that it can be really tough to figure out if you’re doing keto right. Am I eating too many carbs? Too much protein? Should I still be feeling tired? When is the fat burning supposed to start? It’s confusing, and one of the most confusing aspects is what your optimal ketone levels are supposed to be. Unlike most other diets, the ketogenic diet is designed to put your body into a state of ketosis in order to get your body to start burning ketones instead of the glucose that it usually burns when you eat a high carb standard American diet (SAD). But to know whether you’re in ketosis and whether your body has enough ketones circulating for you to use as energy instead of glucose, you have to measure your actual ketone levels and then determine whether they’re high enough for you to be reaping the benefits of the ketogenic diet. If you’ve tried searching for this information already, then you’ll know that there’s some controversy depending on which expert you follow. So in this article, we’ll tell you exactly what the different experts are suggesting are the optimal ketone levels as well as give you recommenda Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. sarahmony

    Hi all, I haven't been able to find this answer through the search function nor online, but I am wondering if achieving optimal ketosis (1.5 - 3.0mmol/L) will happen once I become Keto-adapted; or is it contingent only on my macro intake now?
    My blood ketone readings are never less than 0.5 but also haven't been more than 0.8. Even when I was on a several-day stretch of 15-20net carbs I was not seeing a higher reading.
    To get into ketosis (0.5), I typically can consume up to 40 carbs, but as my will power and determination have increased in the last two months, I am content at around ±25 and no more than 30. So from my logging, whether it is 20carbs or 40 carbs, I am still at 0.5.
    That being said, I am losing weight, kind of... (A lot at first, and lost some inches now but nothing during the past month), my workouts consist of soccer (1x/W), crossfit (5x/W), dance (2x/W), and heavy weight training (1x/W).
    But really, I am just curious how this "optimal ketosis" scale works, if it is systematic in becoming fat-adapted or something I should be striving to achieve (like 10 net carbs?) now.
    In case needed: 25/100/124 ~1616-1645kcal intake, usually. Around 29%BF

  2. DownhillYardSale

    Hi all, I haven't been able to find this answer through the search function nor online, but I am wondering if achieving optimal ketosis (1.5 - 3.0mmol/L) will happen once I become Keto-adapted; or is it contingent only on my macro intake now?
    "Optimal ketosis" is rather meaningless.
    Your ketone levels will vary based upon a LOT of factors, the most important of which being your ingestion of glucose or something that can be converted directly into it, raise your insulin and cause ketone production to cease and therefore drop the levels when you urinate them out.
    My blood ketone readings are never less than 0.5 but also haven't been more than 0.8. Even when I was on a several-day stretch of 15-20net carbs I was not seeing a higher reading.
    It doesn't matter. As a matter of fact having higher levels of ketones will cause an insulemic response which will increase your blood sugar so there comes a point where having too many ketones is counterproductive.
    But really, I am just curious how this "optimal ketosis" scale works, if it is systematic in becoming fat-adapted or something I should be striving to achieve (like 10 net carbs?) now.
    It's largely irrelevant. If you are over 0.5 mmol/L then there is no reason to push yourself any further. There are too many factors going into your ketone levels to try and optimize your levels, particularly when you have no idea what that even does to your body in the first place.

  3. sarahmony

    Thanks for clarifying this. I couldn't seem to find a satisfying answer online.

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