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Nutritional Ketoacidosis

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I’ll See Your Ketoacidosis And Raise You A Renal Failure

A while back I posted on a paper that appeared in The Lancet about an obese woman who came to the emergency room with gastroenteritis and was misdiagnosed as being in diabetic ketoacidosis (a life-threatening disorder). She was misdiagnosed because the pinheads covering the ER couldn’t get past the fact that she had been on a low-carb diet. At the time I posted on this travesty I noted that this Lancet paper would from here on out be waved in the face of anyone who was following or advocated a low-carb diet as proof that such a diet is dangerous and can cause diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Well, now we’ve got an answer. Next time someone tells you that it has been proven that low-carb diets are dangerous and can cause ketoacidosis, you can resort to poker terminology and reply that you’ll see their ketoacidosis and raise them a renal failure. A few days ago I got wind of a paper published a few years ago that can be used as a counterpoint to the above mentioned idiotic paper in The Lancet that has given low-carbers such a bad time. This paper, published in the journal Renal Failure in 1998, is, like the other paper, a case report. The short version is as follows: An obese young Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Yai

    To start with, I apologise for my ignorance, however Forum members have been so helpful, I wish to ask another question please:
    I have read many threads saying how successful people have been in lowering their blood glucose and losing weight by drastically cutting their intake of carbohydrates. I believe that fewer than 30g of carbohydrates a day is classed as a ketogenic diet. As a type 2 diabetic of many years, I am worried to try lowering my carbohydrates so much in case I make myself ill. Can anyone offer any comfort please, or have I got my proverbials in a twist?

  2. BrianTheElder

    Yai said: ↑
    To start with, I apologise for my ignorance, however Forum members have been so helpful, I wish to ask another question please:
    I have read many threads saying how successful people have been in lowering their blood glucose and losing weight by drastically cutting their intake of carbohydrates. I believe that fewer than 30g of carbohydrates a day is classed as a ketogenic diet. As a type 2 diabetic of many years, I am worried to try lowering my carbohydrates so much in case I make myself ill. Can anyone offer any comfort please, or have I got my proverbials in a twist? Hi
    @Yai Ketosis is the state in which your body burns ketones instead of glucose for fuel.
    Normally carbs supply glucose and insulin is produced by your body when it detects glucose so that the glucose can cross cell membranes and enter the system. Unfortunately, excessive carbs can lead to excess insulin and your body becomes insulin resistant, which is the start of T2D. One of the functions of insulin is to store fat, so this is a direct side effect.
    An alternative, which was common in the diet in pre-modern times, was to eat more meat and fat (especially) rather than carbs. Without carbs your body produces ketones as fuel as a direct replacement for glucose, ie ketosis replaces glycolysis.
    Ketosis is a natural state and not to be confused with ketoacidosis, which is a serious condition in T1D when the ketones are an order of magnitude higher.
    Generally to achieve ketosis, you should eat less than 20g of carbs/day. You should also eat moderate protein, about 0.8g/kg of body weight. The rest of your diet is fat and you can eat what you like as fat is filling and you will reach satiety before you exceed any calorie limit.

  3. Resurgam

    As you are diabetic lowering your carbs should make you better - but it isn't a one size fits all level of carbs - I used to lose weight easily on 80 gm of carb a day and had to go up higher to stop it - on 20 gm a day I was in a state of collapse and could not walk up stairs, but crawled up on all fours.
    When diagnosed diabetic I went to low carbing to control it, but did not try to get down to what for me are low levels, just went back to normal for me eating - and that seems to have fixed things, though I will be adding in more exercise as the weather improves.

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