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Non Diabetic Ketoacidosis Definition

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Ketoacidosis Versus Ketosis

Some medical professionals confuse ketoacidosis, an extremely abnormal form of ketosis, with the normal benign ketosis associated with ketogenic diets and fasting states in the body. They will then tell you that ketosis is dangerous. Testing Laboratory Microbiology - Air Quality - Mold Asbestos - Environmental - Lead emsl.com Ketosis is NOT Ketoacidosis The difference between the two conditions is a matter of volume and flow rate*: Benign nutritional ketosis is a controlled, insulin regulated process which results in a mild release of fatty acids and ketone body production in response to either a fast from food, or a reduction in carbohydrate intake. Ketoacidosis is driven by a lack of insulin in the body. Without insulin, blood sugar rises to high levels and stored fat streams from fat cells. This excess amount of fat metabolism results in the production of abnormal quantities of ketones. The combination of high blood sugar and high ketone levels can upset the normal acid/base balance in the blood and become dangerous. In order to reach a state of ketoacidosis, insulin levels must be so low that the regulation of blood sugar and fatty acid flow is impaired. *See this reference pap Continue reading >>

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  1. kris90

    Non Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

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  2. kris90

    I had been trying to correct what I believe to be small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (something I believe I have suffered from for years) with a ketogenic diet which has given me success in the past. My symptoms included: abdominal cramping/distention, bloating, gas (very foul), constipation, fatigue, and intense sugar cravings. I am otherwise very healthy (26 years old, 5'8 @ 160 lbs approx 8% bodyfat and active).
    This time around, I decided to follow a more strict ketogenic diet (one that is epi-paleo). I ate lots of salmon, mussels, grassfed beef, eggs, grass fed butter, coconut oil, occasional mixed nuts and almond butter. After a few days to a week in, I noticed more severe symptoms: nausea, racing heart, and spiking random fevers with chills after eating and worsening constipation & bloating let alone major headaches. I ended up checking in to the ER, and was given lactulose to help with constipation. It worked, and my bloating was gone, but still didn't feel right. I went back for some bloodwork, and everything came back normal (I can post results) blood glucose was 4.5 mmol/L. I noticed I would feel ok if I fasted, but as soon as I ate the high-fat keto meal, within an hour I'd spike a fever, and get major nausea and chills. I literally felt poisoned. I decided to check my urinary ketone levels using ketostix, and came back around 8 mmol/L. I was a little concerned given that on the pamphlet that a doctor should be contacted with a reading over 4 mmol/L. I thought perhaps my ketones were too high, so I decided to take in around 50g of carbs to see if that would bring me down. Bad idea. Nausea hit harder than ever and I was over the toilet thought I was dying (everything spinning, vision was fading out, body went numb and tingly, I was slowly drifting away). I had to get my wife to call 911, and luckily before they arrived, I snapped out of it, but had a mild fever and sweats and was shooken up.
    Paramedics said everything was fine, blood pressure a little high but normal with the stress. Also blood glucose was at 8 mmol/L. Decided to have them take me in. Had ketones checked at hospital and read 6 mmol/L, and blood glucose went up to 8.2 mmol/L. They monitored me for a few hours, and blood glucose dropped back to normal by early morning (4.0 mmol/L) and ketones slowly fell as well.
    The next day, I consumed a well balanced diet with carbs (avoiding refined/sugary carbs) and brought myself out of ketosis. All my symptoms went away and I felt better (other than feeling exhausted). Now today (a day later) I continued the well balanced diet, only now all my "pre-keto" symptoms reappeared (major foul gas, bloating, and constipation).
    Can anyone make any sense of this madness? Was this maybe a bad case of "die-off" symptoms? Or could my ketone level have caused me to feel "poisoned"? I wonder why my levels climbed so high since I am not a diabetic. I found a case of "non-diabetic ketoacidosis" which describes my case almost identically: http://www.empr.com/case-studies/a-...betic-patient-whats-the-cause/article/443559/
    Need suggestions on how to combat these GI issues/bacterial overgrowth now. Perhaps a non-keto/low carb diet (100g per day)?

  3. Jenelle

    I have had great success with a low-FODMAP approach. When I eliminate most of the foods that are high in FODMAPs, I experience almost zero digestive distress. If you haven't heard of this ~ definitely worth a Google.

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