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Metabolic Acidosis Compensation Mechanism

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Compensatory Hypoventilation In Metabolic Alkalosis.

Compensatory hypoventilation in metabolic alkalosis. Although hyperventilation is a well-known compensatory mechanism in metabolicacidosis, compensatory hypoventilation has been inconsistent and controversial inmetabolic alkalosis. Six healthy subjects were studied under baseline conditions and during steady-state metabolic acidosis (seven episodes) and alkalosis (14episodes). Minute ventilation (VE) fell in metabolic alkalosis and rose inmetabolic acidosis. These changes in ventilation were entirely due to reductionand elevation of tidal volume (VT) respectively, while respiratory frequency (f) remained unchanged. Alveolar ventilation fell during metabolic alkalosis andresulted in elevation of arterial PCO2 in all subjects. The ventilatory response to arterial PCO2 in all subjects. The ventilatory response to CO2 breathing wasalso diminished. There was a linear relationship between PaCO2 and plasma [HCO-3]in metabolic acidosis and alkalosis which was defined as PaCO2 (mm Hg = 0.7[HCO-a] + 20 (+/- SEM), r = 0.95. Although arterial PO2 and plasma [K+] fellduring metabolic alkalosis, minute ventilation did not change upon breathingoxygen and there was no correlation between changes Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. [deleted]

    Aside from eating the correct foods, is weight loss through keto still still just a matter of calories in/calories out? Does the sated feeling you get from keto foods result in eating less and thus the calorie deficit needed to lose weight? Or is it more complicated than that due to chemistry involved with ketosis?

  2. Cast_Iron_Skillet

    This might help illuminate a few things:
    The amount of ketones formed in the liver depends on the amount of glucose or glycogen (stored glucose) available for use as energy. This reverse ratio means that fewer ketones will be produced in the presence of a lot of glucose. The reason for this is that insulin depresses the formation of ketone bodies. When glucose is being used for energy, ketones are not needed in large amounts. On the other hand, in the absence of adequate insulin, the body metabolizes stored fats to produce the energy that the body’s tissues require.
    From http://www.carbsmart.com/fatsketones.html
    So, essentially, by eating low carb and having a lower amount of available insulin, your body produces more ketones and utilizes your stored fat for energy. Personally, this results in quicker fat metabolism and burning of fat stores when I go on the keto diet. IN that sense, not only do calories in/out matter, but also does the manner in which your body uses its fuel - i.e. fewer carbs => Less insulin => More direct fat burning => More weight loss.

  3. fury420

    So, essentially, by eating low carb and having a lower amount of available insulin, your body produces more ketones and utilizes your stored fat for energy. Personally, this results in quicker fat metabolism and burning of fat stores when I go on the keto diet
    It's important to remember that ketones are not the body's only means to utilize fat for fuel.
    Cells outside the brain do not require ketosis or a ketogenic diet to be able to beta-oxidize fatty acids for fuel. Even on a diet with plenty of carbs muscle tissue will still use fatty acids for fuel at rest, (as evident by low resting respiratory quotient) and up to a certain level of exercise intensity (% of Vo2 max)
    Once fully keto-adapted, the body actually derives the bulk of it's energy from FFA directly, without conversion to ketones. The same happens on non-ketogenic low-carb diets. Someone eating +100g carb/day prevents ketosis, forcing their brain to rely entirely on glucose, all while the rest of their body utilizes FFA for fuel.
    See next comment down for more details

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