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Metabolic Acidosis Compensation Calculator

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Abg Interpreter

pH CO2 HCO3 Result appears in here. Normal Arterial Blood Gas Values pH 7.35-7.45 PaCO2 35-45 mm Hg PaO2 80-95 mm Hg HCO3 22-26 mEq/L O2 Saturation 95-99% BE +/- 1 Four-Step Guide to ABG Analysis Is the pH normal, acidotic or alkalotic? Are the pCO2 or HCO3 abnormal? Which one appears to influence the pH? If both the pCO2 and HCO3 are abnormal, the one which deviates most from the norm is most likely causing an abnormal pH. Check the pO2. Is the patient hypoxic? I used Swearingen's handbook (1990) to base the results of this calculator. The book makes the distinction between acute and chronic disorders based on symptoms from identical ABGs. This calculator only differentiates between acute (pH abnormal) and compensated (pH normal). Compensation can be seen when both the PCO2 and HCO3 rise or fall together to maintain a normal pH. Part compensation occurs when the PCO2 and HCO3 rise or fall together but the pH remains abnormal. This indicates a compensatory mechanism attempted to restore a normal pH. I have not put exact limits into the calculator. For example, it will perceive respiratory acidosis as any pH < 7.35 and any CO2 > 45 (i.e. a pH of 1 and CO2 of 1000). These results do Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. rumSmuggler

    I recently (couple weeks ago) started weights and also taking some protein powder (low carb - 1,8g per serving).
    As suggested I raised my protein intake and I'm somewhere around 1 to 1.2 protein ratio. Last couple days I used ketostix to test my ketones and it was negative. I'm sure I didn't exceed 20g carbs per day because I track all my food.
    Could that higher protein intake kick me out of ketosis?

  2. gupe

    As far as I've been able to discover, there are no absolutely definitive answers to the excess protein => additional glucose => inhibition of ketosis? causal chain question.
    This is a good article: "If You Eat Excess Protein, Does It Turn Into Excess Glucose?" on ketotic.org.
    And here is a recent discussion on "After workout protein needs" on /r/ketogains.
    An important unresolved question is: is gluconeogenesis (the manufacture of new glucose by the liver using proteins and fat) a supply-driven process or a demand-driven process?
    If it is a supply-driven process, then it seems more plausible that excess consumption of protein will lead to higher blood sugar levels.
    But if it's demand-driven, then excess glucose might just be due to the slower removal of glucose from the blood-stream after protein has been eaten, causing a bit of a build-up.
    I think that it might vary a lot from person to person. The best is to measure your own blood ketone concentration before and after eating protein. (The ketostix method is not as reliable, particularly if you've just finished a work-out.)
    Edit: fixed link.

  3. darthluiggi

    It can, but it depends on various factors such as weight, activity level, etc.
    I asked the science behind it to to /u/gogge and he gave a very good explanation in another post.
    Fact is, if you are doing strength training you will need to increase your protein intake, otherwise you will not grow muscle. Also protein comes into play if you are eating at a deficit.
    If you are completely sure that protein is taking you out of ketosis, then drop your intake to 1.0 and see if you get back.
    How much do you weight, what % BF do you have, what kind of excercises are you doing and for how long?
    As a side note: don't rely on ketostsix to see if you are in or out of keto.
    *Edited for grammar.

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