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Gestational Diabetes Treatment | C-section | Fort Worth Tx Fort Worth Tx | Lake Worth | Granbury | Burleson

Breast-feeding (nursing) allows a new mother to feed her infant directly from her breasts. Ideally, an infant will nurse and get milk directly from the mother's nipple but, when that is not possible, milk can be expressed (pumped) from the breast and fed to the infant in a bottle. Breast-feeding provides an infant with essential vitamins, protein and fat, as well as antibodies that help the immune system fight off bacteria and viruses. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), if physically possible, women should exclusively breast-feed their infants for at least the first 6 months of life. Breast-feeding is beneficial to both infant and mother. In addition to providing nutrition, breast milk is easier to digest than formula, and research has indicated that it may lower the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Nursing is also effective at building immunity in infants, and children who nurse have a lower risk of ear infections, asthma, obesity, respiratory infections and type 2 diabetes as they get older. Breast-feeding is also beneficial to the mother in the following ways: Uterus contracts and returns to normal size Lowers the risk of breast and ovarian cance Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. metalmd06

    Does acute DKA cause hyperkalemia, or is the potassium normal or low due to osmotic diuresis? I get the acute affect of metabolic acidosis on potassium (K+ shifts from intracellular to extracellular compartments). According to MedEssentials, the initial response (<24 hours) is increased serum potassium. The chronic effect occuring within 24 hours is a compensatory increase in Aldosterone that normalizes or ultimatley decreases the serum K+. Then it says on another page that because of osmotic diuresis, there is K+ wasting with DKA. On top of that, I had a question about a diabetic patient in DKA with signs of hyperkalemia. Needless to say, I'm a bit confused. Any help is appreciated.

  2. FutureDoc4

    I remember this being a tricky point:
    1) DKA leads to a decreased TOTAL body K+ (due to diuresis) (increase urine flow, increase K+ loss)
    2) Like you said, during DKA, acidosis causes an exchange of H+/K+ leading to hyperkalemia.
    So, TOTAL body K+ is low, but the patient presents with hyperkalemia. Why is this important? Give, insulin, pushes the K+ back into the cells and can quickly precipitate hypokalemia and (which we all know is bad). Hope that is helpful.

  3. Cooolguy

    DKA-->Anion gap M. Acidosis-->K+ shift to extracellular component--> hyperkalemia-->symptoms and signs
    DKA--> increased osmoles-->Osmotic diuresis-->loss of K+ in urine-->decreased total body K+ (because more has been seeped from the cells)
    --dont confuse total body K+ with EC K+
    Note: osmotic diuresis also causes polyuria, ketonuria, glycosuria, and loss of Na+ in urine--> Hyponatremia
    DKA tx: Insulin (helps put K+ back into cells), and K+ (to replenish the low total potassium
    Hope it helps

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