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How To Avoid Ketoacidosis

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Can You Die Of Starvation With Large Amounts Of Adipose Tissue?

This paper gives an numbers based answer, and by extrapolation, it would seem the more adipose tissue you have, the longer you can without food: “Anaverage human of 165 pounds has roughly 33 pounds of fat…and 26 pounds of protein suspended in 132 pounds of lean body mass, mostly muscle. Practicallyall of the body fat is expendable without serious adverse effects. In contrast, only one-half of the body’s protein can be mobilized and used as fuel before death occurs. Theconversion of 6 kg of protein to glucose results in the formation of only 3.4 kg of glucose. If the brain oxidizes 100–145 g of glucose daily, the average human could starve for only 23–34 days. The fact that the brain can derive two-thirds of its energy from ketone bodies, synthesized mostly from fat, allows humans to survive total starvation for 60–90 days.”1 1. Owen OE. Ketone Bodies as a Fuel for the Brain during Starvation. Biochemistry And Molecular Biology Education. 2005. Vol. 33, No. 4, pp. 246–251, 2005. Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. ItsCouldveNotCouldof

    So I get that with type 1 DM, the lack of insulin prevents the breakdown of glucose which leads the cells to look for other means of energy which are fats and proteins which in turn eventually turns into ketones. Ketones are acidic and using them for energy will eventually cause metabolic acidosis. The lungs will then compensate to get rid of CO2 which are acidic by doing kusmaul respiration.
    Why does kussmaul respiration occur specifically for this condition when the body usually compensates to metabolic acidosis by hyperventilating?

  2. auraseer

    Why does kussmaul respiration occur specifically for this condition when the body usually compensates to metabolic acidosis by hyperventilating?
    That is why. You seem to have typed out a decent explanation. I don't know what else you're asking.
    Kussmaul breathing is a type of hyperventilation characterized by breaths that are both rapid and deep. It is the response to any severe metabolic acidosis, of which DKA is the most common example. The body is responding to the low pH by increasing respiratory drive, attempting to blow off Co2 and thereby increase pH.

  3. ItsCouldveNotCouldof

    Thanks! I guess the better question would be why is it deeper respirations?

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