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How Does Ketosis Affect Blood Pressure

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High Blood Pressure And The Low Carbohydrate Diet

Hello, fellow low carbers. It’s nice to be back. I am now married, so you will notice a name change. I will now be able to add new articles to “The Nurse Is In” on a regular basis. There will be a new one every two weeks, so please keep those questions coming. I will be answering them individually, as well as taking a few of them and expanding them into articles. I decided to pick out a question on high blood pressure and the low carbohydrate diet for this article. The question has been asked several times by different people, and I think that it’s an important one. Can A Low Carbohydrate Diet Cause High Blood Pressure? There are many things that happen to your body to cause your blood pressure to increase. I have been asking this question of physicians that I know, and the consensus is that they feel that obesity is a much greater risk factor than any diet. They would prefer that their patients lost the weight on a low carbohydrate diet and just monitored their blood pressure to make sure that it did not get dangerously high. There was also a general consensus that they actually saw their patients’ blood pressures decrease when they followed a low carbohydrate regime. Wh Continue reading >>

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  1. mcs5309

    I have been eating low-carb paleo and IF 18/6 for the last 6 months and have been able to reduce some bodyfat which was the goal. I havbe a long way to go, so I added keto to the mix in the last couple weeks, increasing fat to about 65%, protein 30%, and carbs 5%.
    2 weeks prior to starting keto, my latest CMP showed elevated BUN (36 - ref range: 6-24), elevated BUN/Creatinine ratio (39 - ref range:9-20), and elevated urinary uric acid (1118.0 - ref range: 250.0-750.0). I also showed elevated serum calcium (10.9 - ref range: 8.7-10.2). My serum uric acid (UA), however, was normal (4.6 - ref range: 3.7-8.6) as is my creatinine (0.92 - ref range 0.76-1.27) and eGFR (95 - ref range >59). There is no protein in my urine. I do not have gout. These levels have gradually increased over the last 6 mos. I posted on my elevated BUN & uric acid recently: http://www.allthingsmale.com/forum/showthread.php?21082-Need-input-Elevated-BUN-urine-uric-acid
    Just yesterday noticed blood pressure remained elevated all day despite my usual BP-lowering supps. First time ever they had zero effect. I wonder if the increased intake of fats (SFAs) on the keto/low carb diet are causing this, as I have changed nothing else perhaps by increasing total cholesterol?
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9021429
    but this contradicts that:
    http://weightoftheevidence.blogspot.com/2006/02/what-does-saturated-fat-do-to-your.html
    Or could this be the beginning stages of kidney dysfunction, as it goes hand-in-hand with hypertension?
    According to this article, keto may help reduce BP, but may cause kidney stones, the very thing I'm trying to prevent from recurring:
    http://voices.yahoo.com/ketogenic-diets-help-control-blood-pressure-5349961.html
    More on keto and stones:
    http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2010/11/dangers-of-zero-carb-diets-iv-kidney-stones/
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17621514
    http://paleohacks.com/questions/14847/does-a-ketogenic-diet-cause-kidney-stones#axzz26twJurzQ
    And this excerpt from the Paul Jaminet link above explains my elevated uric acid as well:
    Uric Acid Production
    One difference between a ketogenic (or zero-carb) diet and a normal diet is the high rate of protein metabolism. If both glucose and ketones are generated from protein, then over 150 g protein per day is consumed in gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis. This releases a substantial amount of nitrogen. While urea is the main pathway for nitrogen disposal, uric acid is the excretion pathway for 1% to 3% of nitrogen. [7]
    This suggests that ketogenic dieters produce an extra 1 to 3 g/day uric acid from protein metabolism. A normal person excretes about 0.6 g/day. [8]
    In addition to kidney stones, excess uric acid production may lead to gout. Some Atkins and low-carb Paleo dieters have contracted gout.
    Perhaps I should cycle my protein intake as well as carbs? Increase fat even more?
    And what amount of water is recommended for low-carbers? Gallon/day?
    I'm at a loss as to what else I can do.
    Any feedback appreciated!

  2. seekonk

    The idea that this kind of diet is good for everyone is outdated. A significant percentage of people do worse on low-carb/high fat diets for genetic reasons. If you are interested, the SNPs are rs5082 (GG allele associated with worse health markers on high saturated fat diet), rs662799 (AA allele associated with higher BMI from diet with more than 30% fat), and rs1801282 (CC allele does not benefit from high monounsaturated fat diet w.r.t. BMI).

  3. mcs5309

    seekonk said: ↑
    The idea that this kind of diet is good for everyone is outdated. A significant percentage of people do worse on low-carb/high fat diets for genetic reasons. If you are interested, the SNPs are rs5082 (GG allele associated with worse health markers on high saturated fat diet), rs662799 (AA allele associated with higher BMI from diet with more than 30% fat), and rs1801282 (CC allele does not benefit from high monounsaturated fat diet w.r.t. BMI). Thanks. Where can one get these tests done? Regular labs like Labcorp and Quest don't do them.

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