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Hhs Diabetes Guidelines

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Hyperglycemic Crises: Managing Acute Complications Of Diabetes

Authors: Kim Cathcart, MS, RN, RRT | Cheryl Duksta, RN, ADN, M.Ed | Kate Biggs, RN, MSN Hyperglycemia occurs from time to time in all people with diabetes. However, at times, hyperglycemia can lead to acute, life-threatening complications known as Hyperglycemic Crises. This course is designed to educate healthcare professionals about the emergencies associated with hyperglycemic crises, including causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State (HHS) and Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA). Course objectives include: Paraphrase the pathophysiology of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) Interpret diagnostic findings related to DKA Relate the nurse’s role in caring for patients with diabetic complications About the Authors Kim Cathcart, MS, RN, RRT, started working in the field of inhalation therapy in 1976 and by 1979 had completed her first test to become a registered respiratory therapist. She earned a bachelor's degree in general studies and a master's degree in educational administration from the University of Dayton, and later she received her bachelor's degree in nursing from Wright State University. She has taught clinicals and labs in respiratory therapy an Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. tk421

    Sorry if this doesn't belong in this part of the forum, but it seems better here than the other places in the forum.
    I am having trouble finding a solid answer to this. Everywhere I look online tells me something different. I see some say around 50 mg/dl which I would think is totally hypoglycemic. So I don’t really believe that. I see others saying as long as you are below about 97 mg/dl. I see others that say in the 80s. Some say other things. I just want a straight answer. So I need some advice from a successful keto person.
    What is proper blood glucose levels for someone who is in ketosis? I got this blood glucose monitor and I think it may be defective or just a crappy brand. Yesterday my fasting blood glucose (after a 14 hour fast) was 83 mg/dl. Today (again after a 14 hour fast) was 97. I couldn’t believe it so I took my blood glucose again and it said 92. Then I ate exactly 3 pieces of bacon and a piece of cheese, and two hours later my blood glucose was 102. I thought WTF, so I immediately took it again and it said 109.
    So maybe I have a defective monitor (the Nova Max Plus), but regardless, there is probably at least a little bit of truth to it. But I seriously eat 25 grams or less of carbs per day. Usually less.
    Could someone please explain glucose levels to me in regards to ketosis.

  2. JBean

    In the absence of dietary carbohydrates, your body will break down fats and proteins to maintain your blood glucose in the normal range. Here's an explanation:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluconeogenesis

  3. tk421

    Originally posted by JBean
    In the absence of dietary carbohydrates, your body will break down fats and proteins to maintain your blood glucose in the normal range. Here's an explanation:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluconeogenesis Very interesting. Thanks for the info, that helps me a lot!!
    Cheers

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