diabetestalk.net

Do Ketones Cause Kidney Failure?

Share on facebook

Resist The Dark Side And Easily Shift Into Ketosis

Four years ago, I realized that I’d been duped. I’d been lied to about carbohydrates. Despite obtaining a graduate degree with advanced courses in human nutrition, biochemistry, microbiology, and exercise physiology, a sports nutritionist certification, and plenty of time with my face stuffed in dietary research journals, I was simply doing things completely back-asswards when it came to fueling my body. See, my physical performance on my “gold-standard” 50-60% carbohydrate intake was just fine. Performance wasn’t an issue. I was quite competitive and very fast in my triathlons, runs, swims, bike rides, and workouts. But I also had bloating. Gas. Fermentation. Wildly fluctuating energy levels. Extra bits of fat around my belly and hips. Inflammation. All the warning signs of high blood glucose. All the signs that I was sacrificing health and longevity for performance…all the issues I talk about in gory detail in my book Beyond Training. So I simply gave a finger to dyed-in-the-wool, orthodox sports nutrition advice that trickles down from companies like Gatorade, Powerbar, and the US Government’s Food Pyramid. I took a deep, deep dive into a more ancestral, natural fo Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. doug684

    Ketosis can cause damage to kidneys and liver

    So I'm about to fire up a keto regiment (again, I always fall off the wagon after about 2 months). Just searching around as it seems the other two times I started it I tend to have diarrhea a lot. Anyway, came across this. Any truth to this?

    When protein is deflected in this manner, it releases nitrogen into the blood stream, placing a burden on the kidneys as they try to excrete excessive urinary water due to sodium loss. When fat is likewise deflected, the breakup releases fatty acids, or ketones, into the bloodstream, further burdening the kidneys. If ketosis continues for long periods of time, serious damage to the liver and kidneys can occur, which is why most low-carbohydrate, or ketogenic diets recommend only short-term use, typically 14 days.
    http://www.holisticonline.com/remedi...nd-ketosis.htm

  2. Eileen

    I don't know where to start.
    Okay, I'll start with the assumption that keto is high protein. No, it's not, it's moderate protein compared with standard BB diets. The dangers of protein to the kidneys would apply far more to a 40/40/20 diet than to a keto one. If they applied. But they don't. People with damaged kidneys can not tolerate high levels of protein. So some "experts" have extrapolated this to mean that high levels of protein can damage healthy kidneys. Except there has not been one single case of this ever, in the history of recorded medicine.
    Most keto diets do not recommend 14 days or less, that's the classic way to do it wrong. Most low carb diets recommend making it a lifestyle.
    And again, where is the evidence that ketones do any damage to liver or kidneys or any other organ? Not a single case. The closest to damage from a low carb diet comes from the odd nutcase who tries to combine keto with no liquid, which does put stress on the kidney (just like any other diet which does not include liquid) but because keto is slightly diuretic, you'll see the effects a little quicker.

  3. doug684

    Originally Posted by Eileen
    The closest to damage from a low carb diet comes from the odd nutcase who tries to combine keto with no liquid, which does put stress on the kidney (just like any other diet which does not include liquid) but because keto is slightly diuretic, you'll see the effects a little quicker.

    There are people who try that? I don't see how. Keto makes me thirsty and will often drink constantly as long as my glass of water is full.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

Related Articles

Popular Articles

More in ketosis