diabetestalk.net

Dka Pathophysiology Diagram

Share on facebook

Diabetes Mellitus

4 Treatment The clinical syndrome described by the term diabetes mellitus results from intolerance to glucose. It is a chronic disease caused by an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin and, although all body systems are ultimately affected, it is primarily a disorder of carbohydrate metabolism. The approximate incidence of the disease is 13 cases/10,000 dogs years at risk[1]. Insulin is produced in the beta cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans and is released into the circulation to act on specific cell-surface receptors. Its release is stimulated by rising blood glucose concentration and it is principally insulin which is responsible for the post-prandial cellular glucose uptake and storage observed in humans and dogs. Several hormones (including corticosteroids, progesterone, oestrogen, growth hormone, glucagon and catecholamines) have an antagonistic effect to insulin and cause the blood glucose concentration to increase. Interruptions at any stage in this pathway may produce the clinical syndrome of diabetes mellitus, including: Failure to produce insulin resulting in an absolute deficiency - This may be due to degenerative changes in the beta cells or it may occu Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. sarahmony

    Hi all, I haven't been able to find this answer through the search function nor online, but I am wondering if achieving optimal ketosis (1.5 - 3.0mmol/L) will happen once I become Keto-adapted; or is it contingent only on my macro intake now?
    My blood ketone readings are never less than 0.5 but also haven't been more than 0.8. Even when I was on a several-day stretch of 15-20net carbs I was not seeing a higher reading.
    To get into ketosis (0.5), I typically can consume up to 40 carbs, but as my will power and determination have increased in the last two months, I am content at around ±25 and no more than 30. So from my logging, whether it is 20carbs or 40 carbs, I am still at 0.5.
    That being said, I am losing weight, kind of... (A lot at first, and lost some inches now but nothing during the past month), my workouts consist of soccer (1x/W), crossfit (5x/W), dance (2x/W), and heavy weight training (1x/W).
    But really, I am just curious how this "optimal ketosis" scale works, if it is systematic in becoming fat-adapted or something I should be striving to achieve (like 10 net carbs?) now.
    In case needed: 25/100/124 ~1616-1645kcal intake, usually. Around 29%BF

  2. DownhillYardSale

    Hi all, I haven't been able to find this answer through the search function nor online, but I am wondering if achieving optimal ketosis (1.5 - 3.0mmol/L) will happen once I become Keto-adapted; or is it contingent only on my macro intake now?
    "Optimal ketosis" is rather meaningless.
    Your ketone levels will vary based upon a LOT of factors, the most important of which being your ingestion of glucose or something that can be converted directly into it, raise your insulin and cause ketone production to cease and therefore drop the levels when you urinate them out.
    My blood ketone readings are never less than 0.5 but also haven't been more than 0.8. Even when I was on a several-day stretch of 15-20net carbs I was not seeing a higher reading.
    It doesn't matter. As a matter of fact having higher levels of ketones will cause an insulemic response which will increase your blood sugar so there comes a point where having too many ketones is counterproductive.
    But really, I am just curious how this "optimal ketosis" scale works, if it is systematic in becoming fat-adapted or something I should be striving to achieve (like 10 net carbs?) now.
    It's largely irrelevant. If you are over 0.5 mmol/L then there is no reason to push yourself any further. There are too many factors going into your ketone levels to try and optimize your levels, particularly when you have no idea what that even does to your body in the first place.

  3. sarahmony

    Thanks for clarifying this. I couldn't seem to find a satisfying answer online.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

Related Articles

Popular Articles

More in ketosis