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Can Being Dehydrated Raise Your Blood Sugar?

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Everyday Dehydration Is Having A Major Effect On Your Blood Sugar Levels

Stop and think for a second: Are you dehydrated right now? Are you sure? According to the Institute of Medicine, 75 percent of Americans live with a condition called chronic dehydration. This means that even though you’re drinking fluids throughout the day, your body still isn’t getting the amount it needs to thrive. In fact, chronic dehydration is so common that our bodies get used to it. That’s why you may not feel thirsty, even when your cells are craving some much-needed H2O. People with diabetes are especially prone to daily dehydration. As glucose builds up in the bloodstream, your kidneys are forced to work extra hard to filter out the excess sugar. If they can’t keep up, that sugar is flushed out of your system through urine. High blood sugar can also cause your body to pull fluids from important tissues, such as the lenses of your eyes, muscle tissue, and brain tissue. If left untreated, everyday dehydration can take a pretty serious toll on your blood glucose levels. When your body is lacking fluids, it creates a hormone called vasopressin, which causes your kidneys to retain as much fluid as possible. By keeping in those liquids, your kidneys are also hoarding un Continue reading >>

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  1. Skald the Rhymer

    At least, not directly?
    I have type-2 diabetes which I manage by exercise, diet, and, when absolutely necessary, oral medication. Generally my blood glucose control is good, but every so often I go high for one reason or another. The last time it happened I was with another diabetic I know, woffhandedly commented that I'd need to drink a lot of water that day to bring my blood sugar down. I commented that, yes, I probably would be thirsty and need to drink a lot of water, but that the water ingestion itself was not going to be responsible for the lowering of my BG; she disagreed, saying that she believed that the water drinking, in and of itself, would be helpful.
    Any thoughts on who is correct?

  2. Rachellelogram

    I have reactive hypoglycemia and am for all purposes pre-diabetic, so I get crashes as opposed to highs. Water doesn't alleviate my symptoms and I can't think why it would help you OR me. The only things that bring mine back up are eating, or smoking for a quick counter to the adrenaline rush.
    Unless she's a medical professional, I see no reason to take her seriously. Sounds like she's conflating correlation.

  3. Skald the Rhymer

    I have reactive hypoglycemia and am for all purposes pre-diabetic, so I get crashes as opposed to highs. Water doesn't alleviate my symptoms and I can't think why it would help you OR me. The only things that bring mine back up are eating, or smoking for a quick counter to the adrenaline rush.
    Unless she's a medical professional, I see no reason to take her seriously. Sounds like she's conflating correlation.
    (bolding mine)
    I should think it would help the dry mouth.

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