diabetestalk.net

Woman Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes

Share on facebook

No More Insulin Shots, Thanks To A New Type Of Islet-cell Transplant

With commentary by Camillo Ricordi, M.D., director of the Diabetes Research Institute and a Stacy Joy Goodman Professor of Surgery, Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Miami Miller School Decades after her own pancreas stopped producing insulin, a Texas woman with tough-to-control type 1 diabetes no longer needs daily insulin shots thanks to a new transplant procedure developed at the Diabetes Research Institute (DRI) at UHealth — University of Miami Health System. The process implants insulin-making islet cells onto a layer of fat in the recipient’s abdomen, along with a sticky gel that helps hold the cells in place. Wendy Peacock, 43, from San Antonio, underwent the transplant at Jackson Memorial Hospital in mid-August. In early September, a few short weeks after receiving the cells, researchers announced that the donated cells were working like a natural pancreas – sensing Peacock’s blood sugar levels and pumping out enough blood-sugar controlling insulin, at the right times, so that she no longer needed insulin injections. “The cells starting working right away,” says Camillo Rico Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Chrissalis

    Help- insurance wont cover my pump supplies

    Hey fellow pumpers...
    I need your advice. As of Jan 1st my health insurance plan excludes Durable Medical Equipment, including insulin pump supplies. My income is low and I don't know how I could afford the $100 to $200 a month for my Animas pump supplies. I don't want to go off the pump because I have SOOO much better control and lower A1C on the pump than ever before. I appealed the company's decision but they denied it again.
    Anyone know of places to order cheap pump supplies? Or programs to help people afford medical services that they need? (I live in Washington State.) Any other creative ideas? My solution so far has been to buy the cheapest infusion sets I can and then leave them in longer than I'm supposed to, and I know that's not good.
    Thank you! --Chris

  2. Spike

    Originally Posted by Chrissalis
    Hey fellow pumpers...
    I need your advice. As of Jan 1st my health insurance plan excludes Durable Medical Equipment, including insulin pump supplies. My income is low and I don't know how I could afford the $100 to $200 a month for my Animas pump supplies. I don't want to go off the pump because I have SOOO much better control and lower A1C on the pump than ever before. I appealed the company's decision but they denied it again.
    Anyone know of places to order cheap pump supplies? Or programs to help people afford medical services that they need? (I live in Washington State.) Any other creative ideas? My solution so far has been to buy the cheapest infusion sets I can and then leave them in longer than I'm supposed to, and I know that's not good.
    Thank you! --Chris How much are the cheapest sets u can get? While price isn't a current issue for me now (it will be ,soon enough), I get sets that cost $7.40 each. They wont fit your pump though, so that wont do u any good, but I am wondering how much you are paying for yours. I can get by on $107 a month for supplies (retail--i pay 20% of that). Strips are gonna be a MUCH higher expense for me than pump supplies, once we are no longer covered by group insurance.
    As far as leaving sets in longer, he is my suggestion: IF you have a needle type set, you could move it after 3 days, thereby getting 6 days from one set without incurring tissue scarring. The sets I use (Sure-T's) can be easily moved, and then covered with IV3000 to secure them (the sets' adhesive is one time use, as u know). If you use cannula sets and don't want to switch to a needle type, then you might try extending their use in one spot to 4 days, at the MAX. Reservoirs can be safely refilled once or twice. Don't go overboard with refills because if they leak, the pump may be damaged, not to mention your bg's may go up.
    Be aware that "site fade" may crop up after the 3rd day, if u decide to leave your set in one spot for 4 days.

  3. blondy2061h

    Sure-Ts do come in luer lock, they just have a different name Rapid-D (Accu-Chek) or Contact Detach (Animas). They're all made by the same people.
    Many states have mandates that cover diabetes supplies. Have you checked with your state insurance commissioner?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

Related Articles

Popular Articles

More in insulin