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Will Insulin Lower A1c

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Good News At The Pump

In a one-year trial, patients with type 1 diabetes who used an insulin pump achieved better blood sugar control than patients who used the standard treatment of insulin injections. The pump used in the study contained a built-in blood glucose sensor, giving its users the ability to continuously monitor their blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes is the less common form, where people produce no insulin or only tiny amounts of it. Insulin pumps work by continuously delivering a low level of insulin. Larger amounts of insulin are delivered at mealtime, with the exact amount programmed by the user. This mimics the way the body naturally produces and delivers insulin more closely than insulin injections do. All subjects had set a target of 7.0% or lower for A1C. One year into the study, 27% of the pump users met this target, compared to only 10% of the injection users. Insulin pumps are machines, and anyone who's ever been in a car that didn't start knows that machines don't always work right. Being in a car that doesn't start is merely annoying; depending on an insulin pump that's not delivering insulin is a lot more serious. In the past, people using an insulin pump also needed to use a blood Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. terebellum

    I guess this is just a general question...hoping to get a better idea?!?! Just diagnosed and started on rapid and long acting insulin. My MD and I are currently messaging using myChart every 3-5 days - I sent them my daily reading (4x/day) for the course of those 3-5 days and they make adjustments to my insulin. Obviously...if I have frequent lows I have to contact them sooner. But my blood sugars have been 180-260...granted when I was diagnosed my fasting blood glucose was 300 A1C 11.

  2. alan_s

    terebellum:
    I guess this is just a general question...hoping to get a better idea?!?! Just diagnosed and started on rapid and long acting insulin. My MD and I are currently messaging using myChart every 3-5 days - I sent them my daily reading (4x/day) for the course of those 3-5 days and they make adjustments to my insulin. Obviously...if I have frequent lows I have to contact them sooner. But my blood sugars have been 180-260...granted when I was diagnosed my fasting blood glucose was 300 A1C 11.
    How long is a piece of string? In my own case my A1c was only 8.2% at dx; I reduced that to 7.5% over the next three months by losing a lot of weight but did not start gaining real control until I started following Jennifer's Advice at that time. Over the next six months I went to 5.7%.
    You are in a different situation as you are beginning on insulin. Just as important as your insulin regimen, in fact inextricably related to it, is your diet. What dietary regimen are you following? How quickly you reach normal numbers depends on both aspects.
    I sent them my daily reading (4x/day) for the course of those 3-5 days and they make adjustments to my insulin. Obviously...if I have frequent lows I have to contact them sooner. But my blood sugars have been 180-260...granted when I was diagnosed my fasting blood glucose was 300 A1C 11.
    Those 4x tests are for your doctor. Do they tell you anything to help you directly? Please read the info which will appear if you click on Jennifer's Advice to see what I mean.

  3. abill

    It shouldn't take long with insulin.. As you would know now. Insulin resistance is the problem and even though you have more insulin in your system than a normal person, you still can't make enough. When insulin resistance is lowered, the pancreas can handle it again.
    It's considered best practice to put T2 on short term insulin for up to 3 months when very high. As you would have been told, that it is in conjunction with diet and exercise.
    Short-term intensive insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213858713700068
    "Studies have shown that, when implemented early in the course of type 2 diabetes mellitus, treatment with intensive insulin therapy for 2–3 weeks can induce a glycaemic remission, wherein patients are able to maintain normoglycaemia without any anti-diabetic medication. We thus did a systematic review and meta-analysis of interventional studies to assess the effect of short-term intensive insulin therapy on the pathophysiological defects underlying type 2 diabetes mellitus (pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance) and identify clinical predictors of remission."
    This is a diet they are using to reduce or not need insulin for T2 and can then be adjusted later, to suit carb tolerance
    http://au.atkins.com/new-atkins/the-program/phase-1-induction.html
    watch the last 15 minutes of the video

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