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Basal Bolus Insulin Regimen

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UEDA Upper Egypt Diabetes Association Aswan 2016 Conference

Basal-bolus Insulin Therapy

basal-bolus insulin therapy An insulin regimen for diabetic patients in which patients use short- or rapid-acting insulins before each meal (bolus doses) and a long-acting insulin once a day (basal dose). A typical regimen uses approximately equal doses of long-acting insulin (such as glargine) and short- or rapid-acting insulins. The total dose of premeal insulin is either divided into thirds (if a patient consumes roughly equal amounts of carbohydrates at each meal) or is adjusted so that the meal with the greatest carbohydrate load is covered by a proportionately larger dose of rapid-acting insulin Want to thank TFD for its existence? Tell a friend about us, add a link to this page, or visit the webmaster's page for free fun content. Link to this page: basal-bolus insulin therapy Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Stump86

    Basal/Bolus Therapy

    Basal/Bolus Therapy
    (Multiple Daily Injections (MDI) & Pumping)
    What is Basal/Bolus Therapy?:
    Basal/Bolus Therapy is the attempt by insulin users to mimic a healthy pancreas by delivering insulin constantly as a basal and as needed as a bolus.
    A basal is insulin administered constantly to keep the blood glucose (BG) from fluctuating due to the normal release of glucose from the liver. The liver releases glucose and fats constantly to keep you alive in between meals. Without a constant release of insulin, BG would increase over time, so a basal insulin is given to combat this.
    On MDI a basal insulin is used, which is a long lasting insulin. The two newest are Lantus and Levemir, favored for their long duration (near 24 hours in most people) and flat profiles. They are taken usually once or twice a day and act to mimic basal insulin secretion of a healthy pancreas. As a result, a basal insulin is said to be at the correct dosage when it acts only to counter the constant release of glucose into the bloodstream.
    Basal testing is the method by which insulin users test their basal to ensure it is acting as it should. By skipping activities that would alter their BG (eating, exercise, bolus insulin) users are able to monitor BG fluctuations based on basal insulin action only and determine whether or not their basal insulin is properly set.
    Bolus insulin mimics the burst secretions of the pancreas in response to increases in blood glucose. Bolus insulin is often broken up into meal and correction boluses.
    Meal Boluses are boluses given to reduce BG upon the intake of carbs. Carbs are digested into simple sugars which pass readily into the bloodstream. A healthy pancreas is capable of detecting minute changes in BG and releasing insulin based on the amount of glucose in the blood. Insulin users must determine their meal bolus based on the amount of carbs they eat in a practice known as carb counting which is often tempered by the amount of fats and proteins eaten as well. Insulin is then taken in hopes of matching what a normal pancreas would secrete under the same circumstance and in an attempt of normalizing BG, usually within a few hours.
    Correction Boluses are any boluses taken to bring BG back to normal from a higher number. There are many reasons why a correction bolus would be given, but the purpose is always to return to normal numbers. A healthy pancreas is sensitive enough to change its insulin secretion on a constant basis, and non-diabetics do not typically experience highs. So correction boluses are unique to insulin users.
    Pump Use
    Pump users also practice basal/bolus therapy, through the use of an insulin pump which even more closely mimics a pancreas as it is capable of administering insulin in very small amounts and at a constant rate. Pump users are also capable of changing their basal insulin at will, something which MDI users cannot do, and often have an easier time responding to glycemic excursions than MDI users do.
    Because each insulin has a specific purpose, basal bolus therapy is very dynamic, allowing practitioners to eat a variety of foods and still experience good BG control. Basal/Bolus Therapy is often more difficult than other insulin regimens because occasional basal testing and carb counting are vital to success, and exercise can be tricky to deal with, but it is by far the most flexible method currently available.

  2. Lloyd

    Very well done, as always!
    -Lloyd

  3. SugarfreeB

    Nicely done.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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Basal-bolus Insulin May Require Fewer Increases In Daily Doses Than Other Insulin Regimens

Basal-bolus insulin therapy allowed patients to maintain glycemic control similar to three other daily regimens but resulted in fewer increases in daily insulin doses, a study found. Researchers investigated the association between four insulin regimens and increase in HbA1c or insulin dose in a real-life clinical setting among 757 patients with type 2 diabetes who had been treated with insulin for more than one year. Patient data were derived from a diabetes registry at Tenri Hospital, a regional tertiary care teaching hospital in Japan. The insulin regimens compared in this observational study were: regimen 1, insulin glargine once daily, regimen 2, biphasic insulin twice daily, regimen 3, biphasic insulin three times daily, and regimen 4, rapid-acting insulin analogue three times daily and long-acting insulin once daily. Main outcomes were increase in HbA1c level greater than 0.5%, increase in insulin dose, addition of oral antidiabetic drugs, and weight gain, all measured at one year. HbA1c levels, total daily insulin doses, doses of concomitant oral antidiabetic drugs, body weight, and body mass index were evaluated at baseline and one year. Results were published by the Journ Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Stump86

    Basal/Bolus Therapy

    Basal/Bolus Therapy
    (Multiple Daily Injections (MDI) & Pumping)
    What is Basal/Bolus Therapy?:
    Basal/Bolus Therapy is the attempt by insulin users to mimic a healthy pancreas by delivering insulin constantly as a basal and as needed as a bolus.
    A basal is insulin administered constantly to keep the blood glucose (BG) from fluctuating due to the normal release of glucose from the liver. The liver releases glucose and fats constantly to keep you alive in between meals. Without a constant release of insulin, BG would increase over time, so a basal insulin is given to combat this.
    On MDI a basal insulin is used, which is a long lasting insulin. The two newest are Lantus and Levemir, favored for their long duration (near 24 hours in most people) and flat profiles. They are taken usually once or twice a day and act to mimic basal insulin secretion of a healthy pancreas. As a result, a basal insulin is said to be at the correct dosage when it acts only to counter the constant release of glucose into the bloodstream.
    Basal testing is the method by which insulin users test their basal to ensure it is acting as it should. By skipping activities that would alter their BG (eating, exercise, bolus insulin) users are able to monitor BG fluctuations based on basal insulin action only and determine whether or not their basal insulin is properly set.
    Bolus insulin mimics the burst secretions of the pancreas in response to increases in blood glucose. Bolus insulin is often broken up into meal and correction boluses.
    Meal Boluses are boluses given to reduce BG upon the intake of carbs. Carbs are digested into simple sugars which pass readily into the bloodstream. A healthy pancreas is capable of detecting minute changes in BG and releasing insulin based on the amount of glucose in the blood. Insulin users must determine their meal bolus based on the amount of carbs they eat in a practice known as carb counting which is often tempered by the amount of fats and proteins eaten as well. Insulin is then taken in hopes of matching what a normal pancreas would secrete under the same circumstance and in an attempt of normalizing BG, usually within a few hours.
    Correction Boluses are any boluses taken to bring BG back to normal from a higher number. There are many reasons why a correction bolus would be given, but the purpose is always to return to normal numbers. A healthy pancreas is sensitive enough to change its insulin secretion on a constant basis, and non-diabetics do not typically experience highs. So correction boluses are unique to insulin users.
    Pump Use
    Pump users also practice basal/bolus therapy, through the use of an insulin pump which even more closely mimics a pancreas as it is capable of administering insulin in very small amounts and at a constant rate. Pump users are also capable of changing their basal insulin at will, something which MDI users cannot do, and often have an easier time responding to glycemic excursions than MDI users do.
    Because each insulin has a specific purpose, basal bolus therapy is very dynamic, allowing practitioners to eat a variety of foods and still experience good BG control. Basal/Bolus Therapy is often more difficult than other insulin regimens because occasional basal testing and carb counting are vital to success, and exercise can be tricky to deal with, but it is by far the most flexible method currently available.

  2. Lloyd

    Very well done, as always!
    -Lloyd

  3. SugarfreeB

    Nicely done.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Mark Warren, MD, provides context to the efficacy and safety findings from the DUAL VII trial with liraglutide plus insulin degludec in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Xultophy® Reported A Better Option Than Basal-bolus Insulin Therapy To Manage Type 2 Diabetes By Participants In The Dual Vii Clinical Trial

Abu Dhabi, UAE, 5 December 2017 - Once-daily Xultophy® (insulin degludec/liraglutide) was a better option to manage diabetes compared to multiple daily injections of insulin (basal-bolus regimen). This was reported by people with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar was not controlled on insulin glargine U100 with metformin, and who completed quality-of-life questionnaires as part of the DUAL VII clinical trial.1 In addition, more people preferred to stay on Xultophy® compared with basal-bolus therapy (84.5% versus 68.1%).1 These results were presented today at the 2017 International Diabetes Federation Congress in Abu Dhabi, UAE. "Adding insulin injections at mealtime is an effective option to achieve desired blood glucose levels when basal insulin is not enough, but this raises the level of complexity in the patients' daily management of their diabetes. It can also lead to an increased risk of hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) or weight gain", said Professor Esteban Jódar, University Hospital Quirón Salud, Madrid, Spain. "In the main analysis of the DUAL VII trial, Xultophy® delivered similar glucose reductions to a basal-bolus regimen alongside weight loss, as opposed to weight Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Stump86

    Basal/Bolus Therapy

    Basal/Bolus Therapy
    (Multiple Daily Injections (MDI) & Pumping)
    What is Basal/Bolus Therapy?:
    Basal/Bolus Therapy is the attempt by insulin users to mimic a healthy pancreas by delivering insulin constantly as a basal and as needed as a bolus.
    A basal is insulin administered constantly to keep the blood glucose (BG) from fluctuating due to the normal release of glucose from the liver. The liver releases glucose and fats constantly to keep you alive in between meals. Without a constant release of insulin, BG would increase over time, so a basal insulin is given to combat this.
    On MDI a basal insulin is used, which is a long lasting insulin. The two newest are Lantus and Levemir, favored for their long duration (near 24 hours in most people) and flat profiles. They are taken usually once or twice a day and act to mimic basal insulin secretion of a healthy pancreas. As a result, a basal insulin is said to be at the correct dosage when it acts only to counter the constant release of glucose into the bloodstream.
    Basal testing is the method by which insulin users test their basal to ensure it is acting as it should. By skipping activities that would alter their BG (eating, exercise, bolus insulin) users are able to monitor BG fluctuations based on basal insulin action only and determine whether or not their basal insulin is properly set.
    Bolus insulin mimics the burst secretions of the pancreas in response to increases in blood glucose. Bolus insulin is often broken up into meal and correction boluses.
    Meal Boluses are boluses given to reduce BG upon the intake of carbs. Carbs are digested into simple sugars which pass readily into the bloodstream. A healthy pancreas is capable of detecting minute changes in BG and releasing insulin based on the amount of glucose in the blood. Insulin users must determine their meal bolus based on the amount of carbs they eat in a practice known as carb counting which is often tempered by the amount of fats and proteins eaten as well. Insulin is then taken in hopes of matching what a normal pancreas would secrete under the same circumstance and in an attempt of normalizing BG, usually within a few hours.
    Correction Boluses are any boluses taken to bring BG back to normal from a higher number. There are many reasons why a correction bolus would be given, but the purpose is always to return to normal numbers. A healthy pancreas is sensitive enough to change its insulin secretion on a constant basis, and non-diabetics do not typically experience highs. So correction boluses are unique to insulin users.
    Pump Use
    Pump users also practice basal/bolus therapy, through the use of an insulin pump which even more closely mimics a pancreas as it is capable of administering insulin in very small amounts and at a constant rate. Pump users are also capable of changing their basal insulin at will, something which MDI users cannot do, and often have an easier time responding to glycemic excursions than MDI users do.
    Because each insulin has a specific purpose, basal bolus therapy is very dynamic, allowing practitioners to eat a variety of foods and still experience good BG control. Basal/Bolus Therapy is often more difficult than other insulin regimens because occasional basal testing and carb counting are vital to success, and exercise can be tricky to deal with, but it is by far the most flexible method currently available.

  2. Lloyd

    Very well done, as always!
    -Lloyd

  3. SugarfreeB

    Nicely done.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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