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Best Bottled Salad Dressing For Diabetics

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Salad Dressings | Diabetic Connect

As others have shared, home made are the best. I make one that is equal parts of Greek yogurt mixed with mayonnaise, add a little salt and pepper and some crumbled blue cheese. I add just a tablespoon of cream to loosen it up a little bit. YUM I also have one that is a hot dressing that is wonderful on spinach salads. You cook up about 3 slices of bacon, set aside. Then in that pan you saute about 2T of shallots until they are soft. Add 1/4 cup cider vinegar and 1t of honey mustard (or mustard with some stevia if you like). Then take one or two Roma tomatoes and cut them in half, remove the seeds and grate the tomato flesh into the pan with a box grater, discard the skin. I keep it in a jar in the fridge and the crumbled bacon separate. When I want it for a salad, I just pop a couple of table spoons of it into the microwave for 30 seconds and toss it into my salad, add a few bacon crumbles on top. Yum again. But if I buy dressings I stay away from anything that has "lite" in the title or the very sugary ones like french or Catalina. Even the vinaigrette, as Type1Lou points out, can be filled with carbs. The fewer carbs you put in your salad dressing, the more tomato, peppers or on Continue reading >>

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  1. HappyHiker

    Ideas for adapting the dietary recommendations in Hart and Grossman's "The Insulin Resistance Diet."
    Most of what I'm eating on the IR diet are modifications of what I used to eat. For example, previously, when I made soups, I thickened them with rice or a roux and then ate the soup with loads of crackers on top. Nowadays, I've been thickening soups by adding additional veggies, reducing the amount of broth used, and sometimes pureeing some of the soup with an immersion blender. Another example, smoothies- I used to make them exclusively with fruit (especially canned pineapple and frozen bananas). Now, I'm adding yogurt or a chunk of tofu to up the protein and adding frozen spinach to increase the non-sugar content of the smoothie. Whereas I used to rely on grains to make up the base of my non-leafy green salads, now I'm using the grain (often quinoa or millet) as a component of the salad as I increase the quantities of veggies and beans.
    Breakfasts:
    1. The standby of two scrambled eggs with lots of veggies (bell peppers, mushrooms, etc.). I crack the eggs into a mug and whip them up with an immersion blender; they're much lighter and fluffier than when I used to scramble them with a fork. I usually top the eggs with 1TBS grated parmasean and lots of spices.
    2. Protein pancakes (1/4 cup cottage cheese, one egg, a little water, and a scant 1/2 cup of rolled oats whipped in a mug with an immersion blender). Usually eat these with 1TBS of peanut butter and some fruit.
    3. Greek yogurt with walnuts, flaxseed, and fruit (usually berries- when berries are on sale, I buy lots and freeze them. Then at night, I dump some frozen berries into a bowl in the fridge for the next morning.)
    Morning snacks (almost always eaten on the go):
    1. Thirty almonds (or a similar serving of other nuts) eaten with a apple slices dusted with cinnamon.
    2. A few spoonfuls of pumpkin seeds or sunflower seeds with a piece of fruit or veggies (baby carrots and cherry tomatoes have been my favorites lately.)
    3. String cheese with fruit (I put the string cheese in a bag next to a frozen water bottle to keep it cool.)
    4. Trail mix
    Lunch:
    1. Bean based soup with lots of veggies and a "rich topping" (examples: pesto minestrone without pasta added topped with parmasean, chipotle black bean soup topped with avocado and cheddar, curry chickpea with a swirl of yogurt). I make huge batches of soup and freeze them in single serving tupperwares.
    2. Creamy green vegetable soups (e.g., broccoli cheese or cream of asparagus).
    3. Veggie, bean, grain combination salads (no leafy greens, just very dense salads heavy on the chopped veggies, usually topped with an homemade vinaigrette).
    4. Bean patties (using black beans, blackened peas, kidney beans, or garbanzo beans). I cook the beans and mash them with finely diced veggies, spices, sometimes cheese and then I make little patties and press the patties into wheat germ (as sort of a crust) and bake them. I've been experimenting with different spices and dipping sauces. (Example- felafel with yogurt, lemon, and tahini sauce. Example- black bean patties spiced with cayenne and cumin dipped into yogurt mixed with chipotles in adobo sauce). I usually supplement the bean patties with appropriate raw veggies.
    5. A "snack lunch." this'll usually start with a green smoothie (tofu, spinach, 1/2 frozen banana, lime juice, ginger paste, etc.), include a scoop of cottage cheese to up the protein, and finish with random leftovers from around the kitchen.
    Afternoon snack:
    Similar to morning snacks, but since I'm usually home in the afternoon, it often comes from the microwave.
    1. Milk with instant coffee to make a fake latte (I've been experimenting with adding canned pumpkin, honey, and cinnamon to make pumpkin lattes.)
    2. Frozen stir fry veggies with Thai peanut sauce (PB, dash of spy sauce, cayenne, lemon juice, dried onion, ginger, etc. microwaved in a bowl and drizzled onto the veggies.)
    Dinner:
    Usually my dinner is a variation of what my husband and daughter are eating. For example:
    1. If they're having pizza, instead of having several slices along with them, I'll have one single slice accompanied by a "pizza toppings bowl" (exactly what you'd imagine- a bowl of all the toppings I put onto the pizza (veggies, spices, pesto, and cheese). I eat the "pizza toppings bowl" simultaneously with the pizza slice.
    2. If they're having burritos, I'll have a single tortilla overstuffed with all the goodies rather than two or three understuffed tortillas.
    3. If they're having a pasta/casserole dish, I'll have a small serving of the starchy dish accompanied with non-starchy toppings (like the "pizza toppings bowl," but with veggies/sauce that matches the meal.)
    4. I've also taken to sort of including crudités on the table most night (as a healthy munching option). If the veggies get eaten, great. If not, they become part of the next day's snack.
    To make this diet work, it's helped to have some premium ingredients (especially seasonings) on hand. Examples: I have a ton of pesto on the freezer from this summer's basil, I buy fancy, intense cinnamon from a specialty spice shop, and grated parmasean. I think flavoring up my food with high quality spices/seasonings to switch up the "ethnicity" of my mesls has helped the IR diet be fun rather than monotonous for me.
    I started this new thread because I couldn't find much on a vegetarian IR diet and would love to hear more suggestions about interesting foods to try! Please share!

  2. holly2402

    im new here! thrilled to see advice on eating as i struggle a lot! and have to admit do not understand much about what diet to have to help out this condition! ill give it a try!

  3. aussiemom

    this is super helpful! there is nothing online about vegetarian-insulin resistant eating plans! i want to start a blog! wanna join?

    Originally Posted by HappyHiker
    Ideas for adapting the dietary recommendations in Hart and Grossman's "The Insulin Resistance Diet."
    Most of what I'm eating on the IR diet are modifications of what I used to eat. For example, previously, when I made soups, I thickened them with rice or a roux and then ate the soup with loads of crackers on top. Nowadays, I've been thickening soups by adding additional veggies, reducing the amount of broth used, and sometimes pureeing some of the soup with an immersion blender. Another example, smoothies- I used to make them exclusively with fruit (especially canned pineapple and frozen bananas). Now, I'm adding yogurt or a chunk of tofu to up the protein and adding frozen spinach to increase the non-sugar content of the smoothie. Whereas I used to rely on grains to make up the base of my non-leafy green salads, now I'm using the grain (often quinoa or millet) as a component of the salad as I increase the quantities of veggies and beans.
    Breakfasts:
    1. The standby of two scrambled eggs with lots of veggies (bell peppers, mushrooms, etc.). I crack the eggs into a mug and whip them up with an immersion blender; they're much lighter and fluffier than when I used to scramble them with a fork. I usually top the eggs with 1TBS grated parmasean and lots of spices.
    2. Protein pancakes (1/4 cup cottage cheese, one egg, a little water, and a scant 1/2 cup of rolled oats whipped in a mug with an immersion blender). Usually eat these with 1TBS of peanut butter and some fruit.
    3. Greek yogurt with walnuts, flaxseed, and fruit (usually berries- when berries are on sale, I buy lots and freeze them. Then at night, I dump some frozen berries into a bowl in the fridge for the next morning.)
    Morning snacks (almost always eaten on the go):
    1. Thirty almonds (or a similar serving of other nuts) eaten with a apple slices dusted with cinnamon.
    2. A few spoonfuls of pumpkin seeds or sunflower seeds with a piece of fruit or veggies (baby carrots and cherry tomatoes have been my favorites lately.)
    3. String cheese with fruit (I put the string cheese in a bag next to a frozen water bottle to keep it cool.)
    4. Trail mix
    Lunch:
    1. Bean based soup with lots of veggies and a "rich topping" (examples: pesto minestrone without pasta added topped with parmasean, chipotle black bean soup topped with avocado and cheddar, curry chickpea with a swirl of yogurt). I make huge batches of soup and freeze them in single serving tupperwares.
    2. Creamy green vegetable soups (e.g., broccoli cheese or cream of asparagus).
    3. Veggie, bean, grain combination salads (no leafy greens, just very dense salads heavy on the chopped veggies, usually topped with an homemade vinaigrette).
    4. Bean patties (using black beans, blackened peas, kidney beans, or garbanzo beans). I cook the beans and mash them with finely diced veggies, spices, sometimes cheese and then I make little patties and press the patties into wheat germ (as sort of a crust) and bake them. I've been experimenting with different spices and dipping sauces. (Example- felafel with yogurt, lemon, and tahini sauce. Example- black bean patties spiced with cayenne and cumin dipped into yogurt mixed with chipotles in adobo sauce). I usually supplement the bean patties with appropriate raw veggies.
    5. A "snack lunch." this'll usually start with a green smoothie (tofu, spinach, 1/2 frozen banana, lime juice, ginger paste, etc.), include a scoop of cottage cheese to up the protein, and finish with random leftovers from around the kitchen.
    Afternoon snack:
    Similar to morning snacks, but since I'm usually home in the afternoon, it often comes from the microwave.
    1. Milk with instant coffee to make a fake latte (I've been experimenting with adding canned pumpkin, honey, and cinnamon to make pumpkin lattes.)
    2. Frozen stir fry veggies with Thai peanut sauce (PB, dash of spy sauce, cayenne, lemon juice, dried onion, ginger, etc. microwaved in a bowl and drizzled onto the veggies.)
    Dinner:
    Usually my dinner is a variation of what my husband and daughter are eating. For example:
    1. If they're having pizza, instead of having several slices along with them, I'll have one single slice accompanied by a "pizza toppings bowl" (exactly what you'd imagine- a bowl of all the toppings I put onto the pizza (veggies, spices, pesto, and cheese). I eat the "pizza toppings bowl" simultaneously with the pizza slice.
    2. If they're having burritos, I'll have a single tortilla overstuffed with all the goodies rather than two or three understuffed tortillas.
    3. If they're having a pasta/casserole dish, I'll have a small serving of the starchy dish accompanied with non-starchy toppings (like the "pizza toppings bowl," but with veggies/sauce that matches the meal.)
    4. I've also taken to sort of including crudités on the table most night (as a healthy munching option). If the veggies get eaten, great. If not, they become part of the next day's snack.
    To make this diet work, it's helped to have some premium ingredients (especially seasonings) on hand. Examples: I have a ton of pesto on the freezer from this summer's basil, I buy fancy, intense cinnamon from a specialty spice shop, and grated parmasean. I think flavoring up my food with high quality spices/seasonings to switch up the "ethnicity" of my mesls has helped the IR diet be fun rather than monotonous for me.
    I started this new thread because I couldn't find much on a vegetarian IR diet and would love to hear more suggestions about interesting foods to try! Please share!

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