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What Does Diabetes Look Like On Feet

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Foot Care

When you have diabetes you need to take care of your feet every day Having diabetes can increase your risk of foot ulcers and amputations Daily care can prevent serious complications Check your feet daily for changes or problems Visit a podiatrist annually for a check up or more frequently if your feet are at high risk Your feet are at risk because diabetes can cause damage to the nerves in your feet, blood circulation and infection. Having diabetes can increase your risk of foot ulcers and amputations. This damage is more likely if: You have had diabetes for a long time Your blood glucose levels have been too high for an extended period You smoke – smoking causes a reduced blood flow to your feet, wounds heal slowly You are inactive. It's important to check your feet every day. If you see any of the following- get medical treatment that *day * Ulcer Unusual swelling Redness Blisters Ingrown nail Bruising or cuts If you see any of the following- get medical treatment within 7 days Broken skin between toes Callus Corn Foot shape changes Cracked skin Nail colour changes Poor blood glucose control can cause nerve damage to feet. Symptoms include: Numbness Coldness of the legs A ting Continue reading >>

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  1. anonymous

    I have been taking Metformin for a few months. My doctor wants me to eventually be on 1700 mg a day but to move up slowly. I haven't been able to get above 850 mg (1 pill a day, taken with dinner) because of the terrible stomach side effects. Basically, most days I have diarrhea several times a day, a little while after I eat anything.
    I have read the other questions about how to avoid side effects and have followed the advice about things to eat, but, I am still having trouble. I can eat the same thing two days in a row then be fine one day and have trouble the next. There's no rhyme or reason to it.
    Luckily I work alone most of the time, but now I have a problem. I am going to a very important business conference next week and I simply cannot run out of meetings constantly to go to the bathroom. My absensce would definitely be noted and while I suppose I could explain my problem as medication side effects, it would be much better if I didn't have trouble at all.
    Basically I want to stop taking the Metformin for a few days, until I return from my conference.
    I have appointments with my doctor and a nutritionist set up to talk about this but of course I couldn't get in until after I come back. I am NOT DIABETIC!! (Making that bold so people would see it.) I take the Metformin due to a hormone imbalance and have never had an abnormal blood sugar reading. I guess the point is to keep me from being diabetic.
    Has anyone ever done this? Does it even stop the side effects immediately? I don't want to have a blood sugar rebound problem either.
    Also, any other advice would be great. If I could keep taking the Metformin but avoid the stomach problems I would.
    Thanks, everyone.

  2. Brandon Blatcher

    I take the Metformin due to a hormone imbalance and have never had an abnormal blood sugar reading. I guess the point is to keep me from being diabetic.
    Hey, I'm diabetic who take Metaformin, but since you're not a diabetic it's hard to say how it would affect you and of course, I'm not a doctor. You really should get a professional opinion on this, as you don't mention what your hormone imbalance is or you case history.
    Call the doctor's office and pointedly ask them the question you're asking here. Raise a little hell if you have to. Keep calling, be firm, but polite.
    My absensce would definitely be noted and while I suppose I could explain my problem as medication side effects, it would be much better if I didn't have trouble at all.
    I had a somewhat similar issue in that I was eating small meals or snacks throughout the day to help control the diabetes. Sometimes this would in the middle of very important meetings and I'd get that look or a crack about eating at the time. My attitude was and is, fuck it, this what I have to do to stay healthy, get over it. A politer, more business like way of saying that is "Oh, I doing this for medical reasons, so I can be more efficient doing my work."
    The situation isn't totally analogous to yours, but my point is that you shouldn't sacrifice your health for medical reasons. Do what you gotta and juggle a few hats to make the business stuff work.

  3. TedW

    To a large extent it depends on why you are taking the metformin. Your doc should at least be able to talk to you on the phone to let you know whether or not you can stop for a few days.

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