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How To Diabetes Control

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So anybody with high sugars more than 200, usually requires medicine, but somebody at the age of 50, if the disease is recently developed, what we know to know more is the HbA1c level. If the HbA1c levels are less than 7.5 to 8, then definitely lifestyle modification and diet and exercise can significantly bring it down to less than 7. So 7.5 HbA1c, definitely there are 70% chances that your sugars can come down. Still 30% of you may not respond well to only diet and exercise and will require diet, exercise and medicine. diet and exercise are required whether your sugars are under good control or under poor control because they are the baseline foundation above which the medicine will work. So hence diet and exercise is applicable for all ages and at the age of 50 if your sugars are 218, then definitely it will improve. Just check your HbA1c. If your HbA1c is less than 8, then chances of improvement are very good. If it is more than 8, 8.5, 9, 10, then definitely medicine is required along with diet and exercise. The benefit of diet and exercise is that the amount of medicines required will be significantly less if you are very strict. If you are not strict then, you will end up in many medicines.

Can Any Body Suggest How To Control Type Ii Diabetics Naturally Without Taking Strong Medicines And Live Healthy Life?

Type II diabetes is completely, safely and quickly reversible so that one can continue to live a healthy life, free of medications, free of doctors and free of the fear of complications. Continue reading >>

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  1. HarmonyStarr

    Depo Provera, PCOS and Diabetes

    Hi, I'm Beth and I'm newly diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes. I also have PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome), which I was diagnosed with at about 25 (I'm 37 now). One of the symptoms of PCOS is insulin resistance and up until 2008, was never much of a problem for me, as my sugars were, apparently, basically normal, though my doctor was recently mentioning that I was pre-diabetic, but prescribed Metformin, which is common for PCOS. However, in April, 2009, my gyno put me on Depo Provera basically because instead of not having a menstrual cycle at all, I was bleeding intermittently throughout the day for a couple hours at a time (sorry to the guys if this is kinda gross for you). In September of 2009, I had a glucose reading of 187. In October of 2009, my bleeding became 24/7 and in May I had to have a hysterectomy. The morning of my surgery was when they diagnosed me with diabetes, my blood sugar being 355 at that time (that was a fun day, I can assure you). They did an A1C and determined that I was at 11.4% with an average of 280. They immediately put me on insulin, Lantus at night and Novolog before each meal, basically stating that because of the PCOS, they couldn't start me on pills.
    My PCP asked me what changed between the summer of 2008 and September of 2009 and the only thing I can come up with that changed was the fact that I was started on Depo. After doing some research, I found that Depo raises blood sugar levels and that women with diabetes need to be closely monitored. However, I was not diagnosed with diabetes at that time, only pre-diabetes because of PCOS, which my gyno was well aware of.
    So, after all that rambling background, here's my question: Has anyone else been diagnosed with diabetes after having taken Depo? And did you find that your levels started going back to normal after the Depo has been stopped?
    My last shot was in March 2010, so my 12 weeks is now up and, obviously, with the hysterectomy, I no longer need to take the Depo. I'm hoping that perhaps there is a light at the end of the tunnel and perhaps my levels will go back to normal after this crap is out of my system. Thanks for taking the time to read this, if you made it to the end, and thanks for any responses.
    Blessings,
    Beth

  2. PrimaLena

    Sorry-repeat post.

  3. PrimaLena

    Hello, Beth, and everyone else reading. I have PCOS. I am also overweight, there is some diabetes in my family, but I am not diabetic. I just stumbled on this page while searching something else. Initially, I was treated by my PCP with Metformin, then my gynecologist suggested birth control to treat it. As I am a smoker, over thirty, often forget to take daily meds. anyway, and BTW, while taking any birth control carries a crazy amt. of risks and possible side effects, (the reason I put off taking it until the issues, and their effects on my life became just really unbearable) the pill is still the worst. My doctor also said DepoProvera would treat it (though I have heard some say it does not, also, as one of the previous commenters here mentioned-it tends to be GP/PCPs who know less about both any reproductive issues you my have, and what measures are effective, obviously, than your OB/GYN does-always go with the specialist when answers vary.) Then I asked my PCP if there was any reason I should keep taking the Metformin, as I was on the Depo., and he said I should continue, as I may be "prone to other sugar-related issues". Really, I'm prone to just about any issues-I have auto-immune disorders, but whatever. So, I was on both for the past year and a half, and was recently hospitalized with all kinds of crazy problems, which they are telling me are most likely due to "long-term, moderately severe hypoglycemia". They've advised me to go down from two tabs., to one tablet daily of the Metformin, and to not skip any meals. BTW, I had no idea low blood sugar could cause many of the things they're saying it did, like severe, increasing muscle pain and weakness, trouble breathing and swallowing, and other neurological issues, like pains, jerking, tingling and numbness, and an entire leg becoming suddenly useless, but it seems perhaps it can. Regardless, I would imagine that no, Depoprovera does not raise blood sugar levels-at least, for sure, not enough to, in my case, counteract the lowering of it caused by the Metformin. I know this is a diabetic chat, so I would imagine most, if not all, reading have diabetes, but if you do not, and are on it just for PCOS (whether also on any form of birth control or not), I would advise keeping an eye on your blood sugar levels also, nonetheless.

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Sinus is a condition in which the cavities around the nasal passages become inflamed. Suffering from Sinus or Cold? Then with AJ learn to do yoga pose which will help you to get some relief and cure the sinus. So watch Yoga with AJ only on Mind Body Soul. Credits Yoga Instructor : Aparajita Jamwal AJ Director: Dolly Sanghavi Camera: Kavaldeep Singh Jangwal, Manjeet Katariya, Akshay Durgule Editing: Kishor Rai Creative Head: Kavya Krishnaswamy Producer: Rajjat A. Barjatya Copyrights: Rajshri Entertainment Private Limited For More Updates Like us on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/mindbodysoulTV Follow Us on Twitter : https://twitter.com/MindBodySoulTV Follow Us on Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/mindbodysoultv Follow Us on Pinterest : https://www.pinterest.com/mindbodysoultv

How Yoga Poses Control Diabetes?

Diabetes is the biggest health threat among contemporary humans. Disordered lifestyle, irregularities in diet, sleep, stress, etc, are the various reasons that diabetes is spreading like an epidemic. Given below are some of the yoga poses to control diabetes. Anulom-Vilom Pranayam Kapalbhati: Dwichakirakasana: Sarvangasana: Halasana: Uttanasana: It is advised to try these poses at a renowned yoga school in Rishikesh for the best outcome. The consistent practice of yoga aasanas, pranayam and a few minutes of meditation can help reduce stress in the mind and protect the body from its adverse effects. This, in turn, reducing the amount of glucagon and improve the action of insulin. Moreover it helps to reduce the level of sugar in the blood,along with lowering blood pressure, keeping your weight in check, reducing the severity of the symptoms and slowing the rate of progression of the disease. The best diabetic hospital will provide and guide you the yoga sessions along with the routine diabetes medication. Kapalbhati Pranayama stimualtes the abdominal organs and improves the blood circulation Dhanurasana stregthens the back and abdominal muscles also regulates the pancrease Ardhya Ma Continue reading >>

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  1. SpoiledBecca

    i ate a bowl of rasin bran crunch with one teaspoon of sugar on it! and i passed mine. all i was told was eat normally before, but after i drank my flat orange soda (the glucose stuff) i couldnt eat or drink anything (except for a sip of water to wash it down). so eat normally. you dont need to pass out.

  2. Roo_n_Duckys_Mamaw

    I wasn't allowed to eat after midnight for either test.

  3. GoldieLocks3

    I had two mini bagels and cream cheese with a glass of orange juice before mine and got a 90. I've heard the cut off is 130 so I was not even close.

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how to control diabetes in natural way!control diabetes naturally! preparation: roasted black gram , almond , black barley , psyllium husk , take all these things in same quantity...grind finely roasted black gram,almond and black barley.mix them and after it mix psyllium husk ...plz remeber never grind psyllium husk....now take a tea spoon full of this power daily with milk or water... it is best for diabetes and give you good heath..it is a naturally dieat and have zero side effect..best for diabetic patients.other good effects of these things are below: Almonds, while nutritionally beneficial to most people, are especially good for people with diabetes. Research has shown that almonds may reduce the rise in glucose (blood sugar) and insulin levels after meals. Almonds and Your Heart Almonds may reduce your risk of heart disease and overall mortality. This is important for people with diabetes because, according to the World Heart Federation, people with diabetes are at a higher risk of heart disease. almonds could help to maintain healthy levels of blood glucose and cholesterol for both men and post-menopausal women who suffer from type 2 diabetes. Barleys insoluble fiber yields propionic acid that helps keep the blood cholesterol levels low. It, being an excellent source of both soluble and insoluble fibers, is also specifically recommended by doctors for its naturally low-fat content and zero cholesterol properties. Manages Diabetes: Barley works effectively on Type 2 diabetes. However, we can prevent this type of diabetes by losing weight, getting involved in vigorous physical activity and including abundant whole grains in our diet. Therefore, high fiber foods like barley should be included in the daily diet of diabetic patients. Its grain has all the essential vitamins and minerals, particularly beta-glucan soluble fiber, that slows down glucose absorption. how to control diabetes in natural way!control diabetes naturally https://youtu.be/526MDcR6-yc

How Do I Control Diabetes In Natural Way?

Diabetes is not only a rich man disease more!!!! Diabetes is a disorder which is common among oldage people, but now a days due to change in food and lifestyle even youngster with 30+ age are also get affected by diabetes. Let see some 7 natural ways to control our blood sugar level. Fast Fact: Nearly, 300 million people suffering from diabetes in the world. Diabetes makes more serious complication to the body like heart disease, kidney failure. Make small changes in your daily habit and lifestyle surely moves you to get the normal of blood glucose level. Here some best way to how to control diabetes 7 Easy and Natural ways to control blood sugar level: 1.Exercise: Habbitual exercise is a prominent natural cure for diabetes to increase the secretion of insulin and reaction of body cells while insulin secretion helps to manage the normal blood glucose level. You can do the Common exercise like walking, jogging, yoga, swimming,gym schedule your plan depends on your daily work then do which is more comfortable for your time. 2.Avoid sugar from your diet: Try to avoid sugary foods like sweets, beverages in your food helps for the secretion of insulin by the pancreas stimulate by the ho Continue reading >>

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  1. hannahtan

    Somogyi effect VS. Dawn Phenomenon

    As there are a lot of people asking what Dawn Phenomenon and Somogyi effect is... I feel Dlife.com gives a good explanation on it...below is the article...
    -----
    Somogyi effect VS. Dawn Phenomenon
    By Theresa Garnero, APRN, BC-ADM, MSN, CDE
    Have you ever gone to bed with a relatively normal glucose reading, only to wake up with a much higher value? Do you wonder why glucose numbers can swing during sleep or pre-dawn hours? This month’s column will address readers’ questions about the difference between two possibilities: the Somogyi effect and dawn phenomenon.
    What is the Somogyi effect?
    Also known as “rebound hyperglycemia” and named after the physician who first described it, the Somogyi effect is a pattern of undetected hypoglycemia (low blood glucose values of less than 70) followed by hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels of more than 200). Typically, this happens in the middle of the night, but can also occur when too much insulin is circulating in the system. The cause of the Somogyi effect is said to be “man-made”—that is, a result of insulin or diabetes pills working too strongly at the wrong time.
    During periods of hypoglycemia, the body releases hormones which cause a chain reaction to release stored glucose. The end result is that the glucose level can swing too high in the other direction, causing hyperglycemia.
    How can you test for the Somogyi effect?
    This is the fun part. Set your alarm and wake up between 2 and 3 a.m. and test your blood glucose. Low blood glucose levels could signify the Somogyi effect is in action.
    Wouldn’t I know if I’m going too low?
    Not always. Sometimes the body has less of a reaction to low blood sugars, especially if you have had wildly fluctuating glucose values for years and can lead to a condition called autonomic neuropathy, which blocks the body’s ability to detect lows. This is more likely to occur during sleep hours—a frightening thought. One option is to ask your doctor or endocrinologist about a 3-day continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) exam. About the size of a pager, you would wear the device for 3 days. A little plastic tube taped gently beneath your skin allows the CGMS to read glucose readings several times a minute and can explain exactly when lows occur. Companies are competing to have “real-time” glucose values displayed in this device. Currently, the CGMS devices have to be downloaded at the physician or diabetes educator office for interpretation.
    What can I do to correct the Somogyi effect?
    The very best way is to prevent the low from happening in the first place. And that takes a little detective work to figure out what made the glucose plummet. You might try any of the following, with your physician or healthcare provider’s blessing:
    * Have a snack with protein before bedtime, like a piece of toast with peanut butter, or some cottage cheese, or yogurt, or some nuts and small piece of cheese.
    * Go to bed with a glucose level slightly higher than usual.
    * Wake up between 2 to 3 a.m. and test your blood glucose. Bring your logbook to your physician and ask if any medication adjustments are needed (like changing the type and/or amount of insulin, oral medication, or switching to an insulin pump). Do not skip or change your medications without your physician’s input!
    * Ask your doctor about having the CGMS test (see above description).
    What is the dawn phenomenon?
    Named after the time of day it occurs, not some high brow researcher, the dawn phenomenon is the body’s response to hormones released in the early morning hours. This occurs for everyone. When we sleep, hormones are released to help maintain and restore cells within our bodies. These counterregulatory hormones (growth hormone, cortisol and catecholamines) cause the glucose level to rise. For people with diabetes who do not have enough circulating insulin to keep this increase of glucose under control, the end result is a high glucose reading in the morning. For pregnant women, the dawn phenomenon is even more exaggerated due to additional hormones released in the night.
    How can I treat the high fasting glucose readings caused by the dawn phenomenon?
    Several options are worth considering:
    * Exercise later in the day, which may have more of a glucose-lowering effect in the night.
    * Talk with your doctor about a possible medication adjustment to control the higher fasting readings.
    * Limit bedtime carbohydrates and try more of a protein/fat type of snack (nuts, peanut butter, cheese, or meat).
    * Eat breakfast to limit the dawn phenomenon’s effect. By eating, your body will signal the counterregulatory hormones to turn off. This concept can be a little perplexing, as people often say, “But if I don’t eat, shouldn’t my sugar go down?” The opposite is true. By not eating, or skipping meals, it is fairly common to see higher glucose values as a result.
    No matter how we label high glucose values, whether caused by the Somogyi effect or dawn phenomenon, we must figure out their cause. Maybe we can start a dawn phenomenon chat room with everyone who will be setting their alarm clocks to awaken at 2 to 3 a.m. for blood sugar checks! One of the keys of diabetes management is identifying glucose patterns and trends over time. Monitoring is the best way to help solve these situations. Researchers are working diligently on newer systems to help unveil glucose patterns with relative ease. So in the meantime, Test! Don’t Guess – And let me know what you discover!

  2. jwags

    Thanks for the explanation. The only thing I do find is that I need to eat some carbs late at night, not just protein. I think it is the lack of carbs early in the morning that signals DP to start.

  3. Lloyd

    Originally Posted by hannahtan
    How can I treat the high fasting glucose readings caused by the dawn phenomenon?
    Several options are worth considering:
    * Exercise later in the day, which may have more of a glucose-lowering effect in the night.
    * Talk with your doctor about a possible medication adjustment to control the higher fasting readings.
    * Limit bedtime carbohydrates and try more of a protein/fat type of snack (nuts, peanut butter, cheese, or meat).
    * Eat breakfast to limit the dawn phenomenon’s effect. By eating, your body will signal the counterregulatory hormones to turn off. This concept can be a little perplexing, as people often say, “But if I don’t eat, shouldn’t my sugar go down?” The opposite is true. By not eating, or skipping meals, it is fairly common to see higher glucose values as a result.
    No matter how we label high glucose values, whether caused by the Somogyi effect or dawn phenomenon, we must figure out their cause. Maybe we can start a dawn phenomenon chat room with everyone who will be setting their alarm clocks to awaken at 2 to 3 a.m. for blood sugar checks! One of the keys of diabetes management is identifying glucose patterns and trends over time. Monitoring is the best way to help solve these situations. Researchers are working diligently on newer systems to help unveil glucose patterns with relative ease. So in the meantime, Test! Don’t Guess – And let me know what you discover! The methods suggested for treatment of Somogy effect are often effective.
    The methods suggested for treatment of Dawn Phenomenon are almost never effective, unless you have a very mild case.
    An insulin pump can be 100% effective in stopping DP in its tracks, as long as it occurs with regularity, by raising your basal rate to whatever is needed at a given time.
    My fasting readings dropped 100+ points on the first night of using a pump.
    -Lloyd

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