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How Does Diabetes Damage Arteries

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Code List: Res30: Diabetes Mellitus

Research article: Renin-angiotensin system blockade and risk of acute kidney injury: a population-based cohort study Reference: Kathryn E Mansfield, Dorothea Nitsch, Liam Smeeth, Krishnan Bhaskaran, Laurie A Tomlinson(2015) Renin-angiotensin system blockade and risk of acute kidney injury: a population-based cohort study. Submitted, doi: Link to article Abstract Objective: To investigate whether there is an association between use of ACE inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), and risk of acute kidney injury (AKI). Design: A time-updated, new-user cohort study among people initiating common antihypertensives (ACEI/ARB, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers and thiazide diuretics) in primary care between April 1997 and March 2014. Participants: Adults initiating antihypertensive drug treatment, with at least one year of registration prior to first prescription, identified from UK primary care practices contributing to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink and eligible for linkage to hospital records data from the Hospital Episode Statistics database. Main outcome measures: Incidence rate ratio (RR) for first episode of AKI during time exposed to ACEI/ARB compa Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. GGrosie

    I have been working since March to get my numbers down and they just slowly keep creeping up. I am now consistently waking up with 120s and spending the entire day never going under 120. I walk my dog three miles in the mornings and often an evening 1-2 mile walk. I run three days a week and do Pilates with weights twice a week . I know it’s not high on the cardio scale but it’s what I can get myself to do consistently.
    I am 5’6” 128 pounds and definitely in perimenopause. Sometimes my sleep is fabulous, but lately I have many periods of wakeful moments during the evening (I’m assuming lack of sleep and hormones aren’t helping my cause). When have people started metformin (I don’t relish the side effects) but would rather not have that diabetes diagnosis quite yet? I met with an edocronologist in May but he wasn't interested in seeing me until I was diabetic, didn't see the reason to test daily, and was rather dismissive. My last A1C was 6.0 and I thought I had been better but it continued to rise from my previous 5.9. I’m guessing my next one will be higher with my recent meter readings and want to have a knowledgeable conversation with the doctor when results come back in.
    My diet consists of 60-80 carbs a day, mostly vegetarian although I’m eating more chicken to increase lower fat protein as I was gaining weight in my efforts.

  2. Goodgirl08

    Hi G, you are a diabetic. If you can not get your number under 120 then you need to see a CDE . She will go over diet and see where it needs to be changed. If that does not work, then you will need Meds. You can see a internist for what you have and everything else.

  3. abill

    With T2 the signal to block the liver releasing 'sugar is messed up. metformin will help the liver not release 'sugar' and 2,000mg may lower your A1c by 0.5 to 1.5%. and I would ask about metformin, because of its many benefits.
    I would think the rise is hormone based and T2 woman of that age may need to greatly reduce the carbs, to reduce the insulin resistance
    the macros use insulin in different amounts, fat uses the least amount and has the least effect on your BG. This is one of the reasons why a lot use the LCHF diet, The fat is burnt for energy
    100% of carbs turn to glucose
    58% of protein turn to glucose
    10% of fat turn to glucose.
    This is one of the reasons why the carb and protein consumption counting is more important than the fat.
    to maintain your weight and blood glucose numbers first is to minimise carbs and insulin/insulin resistance, some need to go down to 50g or even 20g
    protein could be 75g a day
    fat makes up the rest of the calories for energy, you eat till you are satisfied
    http://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb
    when low carbing, once under 50g carb. protein is used to adjust weight, fat is burnt as energy because the body is fat adapted and isn't stored as body fat.
    Dietary carbohydrate restriction as the first approach in diabetes management: Critical review and evidence based using a LCHF diet
    http://www.nutritionjrnl.com/article/S0899-9007(14)00332-3/fulltext#bib94

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