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Diabetic Lancing Device

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How Deep Should I Set The Lancing Device Of My Blood Sugar Meter?

Once you poke a hole in your finger, a very gentle squeeze should bring the blood to the surface. If you have to milk your finger like a cow you need a deeper or larger diameter hole. Lots of pumping of the finger mixes interstitial fluid (water between cells) into the blood sample and will throw off your results. If it hurts to lance your finger, you probably have your device set too deeply or you put the clear cap on the lance. Yeah, that’s for testing on your forearm. Throw the clear cap away and put the solid one on. For what it is worth, there are some folks out there who really do have hypersensitive fingers. For you folks there are two pretty expensive solutions: a computerized lancing device that lets you micro-control hundreds of different depths; and a laser that burns a painless hole in your skin. The Born-Again Diabetic: The handbook to help you get your diabetes in control (again) Much has been written about the explosion of diabetes on the world stage the 4,000 new cases a day we all know about, the millions of people unaware they have diabetes. But another epidemic is... Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Sweeeeeeeeeet

    The lancing device that comes with my blood glucose meter (Freestyle Lite) really hurts! I tried adjusting it, but it still really hurts! I'm sure you don't have to use the lancing device that comes with your meter kit; it's not like test strips! Does anyone know of a good lancing device that doesn't hurt so much? And, is it even the lancing device that hurts, or is it the lancets, themselves? In which case, can someone please recommend lancets that don't hurt? Oh, and one I can test somewhere other than my fingers. I don't want anyone seeing evidence I'm a diabetic at work, yet! Thanks.

  2. Clivethedrive

    Sweeeeeeeeeet said: ↑
    The lancing device that comes with my blood glucose meter (Freestyle Lite) really hurts! I tried adjusting it, but it still really hurts! I'm sure you don't have to use the lancing device that comes with your meter kit; it's not like test strips! Does anyone know of a good lancing device that doesn't hurt so much? And, is it even the lancing device that hurts, or is it the lancets, themselves? In which case, can someone please recommend lancets that don't hurt? Oh, and one I can test somewhere other than my fingers. I don't want anyone seeing evidence I'm a diabetic at work, yet! Thanks. My accu chek nano lancing device is the least painfull i've used to date,i got it at the local chemist's,are you using the side of your fingertips,its the site of least nerves,ps most of us do not use our index fingers. ( if i showed you my fingers ...you would not see any scaring or marks at all :
    )

  3. Sweeeeeeeeeet

    Clivethedrive said: ↑
    My accu chek nano lancing device is the least painfull i've used to date,i got it at the local chemist's,are you using the side of your fingertips,its the site of least nerves,ps most of us do not use our index fingers. ( if i showed you my fingers ...you would not see any scaring or marks at all :) I only used my fingers to test my blood glucose a couple of times, yes, off to the side. But it leaves a huge mark and it hurts for about a week or so, afterward. When I was in ICU with DKA, they nurses tested every couple of hours, and I came home all black and blue with bruises all up and down my arms and my fingers were so sore and raw-feeling, I started testing on my forearm. But it really really hurts! Maybe I just have sensitive skin.

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