diabetestalk.net

Diabetes 30 Year Old Male

Share on facebook

Code List: Res30: Diabetes Mellitus

Research article: Renin-angiotensin system blockade and risk of acute kidney injury: a population-based cohort study Reference: Kathryn E Mansfield, Dorothea Nitsch, Liam Smeeth, Krishnan Bhaskaran, Laurie A Tomlinson(2015) Renin-angiotensin system blockade and risk of acute kidney injury: a population-based cohort study. Submitted, doi: Link to article Abstract Objective: To investigate whether there is an association between use of ACE inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), and risk of acute kidney injury (AKI). Design: A time-updated, new-user cohort study among people initiating common antihypertensives (ACEI/ARB, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers and thiazide diuretics) in primary care between April 1997 and March 2014. Participants: Adults initiating antihypertensive drug treatment, with at least one year of registration prior to first prescription, identified from UK primary care practices contributing to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink and eligible for linkage to hospital records data from the Hospital Episode Statistics database. Main outcome measures: Incidence rate ratio (RR) for first episode of AKI during time exposed to ACEI/ARB compa Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. bplum

    Hi my husband is 44 fit and an ex footballer , 6ft 3in and 14 st - he was diagnosed as Type 2 about 10 weeks ago, although he suffered erectile dysfunction for about a year before and suffered a numbness in his feet also. My concern is he does not seem to have changed any of his previous habits apart from cutting out sugar and sweets - he still drinks about 8 bottles of beer on a Friday and Saturday and some nights during the week he has alcohol - should he be drinking alcohol as I am really concerned but do not want to sound like a nagging wife. He is on Metaformin (2 a day) I think 500mg. He is looking thin and he is really grumpy which is so unlike him.. thanks any advice welcome.

  2. bplum

    bplum said:
    Hi my husband is 44 fit and an ex footballer , 6ft 3in and 14 st - he was diagnosed as Type 2 about 10 weeks ago, although he suffered erectile dysfunction for about a year before and suffered a numbness in his feet also. My concern is he does not seem to have changed any of his previous habits apart from cutting out sugar and sweets - he still drinks about 8 bottles of beer on a Friday and Saturday and some nights during the week he has alcohol - should he be drinking alcohol as I am really concerned but do not want to sound like a nagging wife. He is on Metaformin (2 a day) I think 800mg. He is looking thin and he is really grumpy which is so unlike him.. thanks any advice welcome.

  3. viviennem

    Hi, bplum, and welcome.
    Alcohol per se is not a really a problem for someone on Metformin, despite what the package insert says. Basically, when you drink alcohol your liver stops working on glucose, instead it turns to handling the alcohol. This can lead to a lowering of blood glucose (because the liver isn't putting any out) and in extreme cases, a hypoglycaemic episode (hypo; = blood glucose too low). You can read up on hypos elsewhere on the forum.
    The packet leaflet warns against alcohol with Metformin just in case someone gets a hypo from drinking; it is something we need to be aware off, but on Metformin-only a hypo is unlikely. Unlike some other drugs used for diabetes, Metformin doesn't lower blood glucose levels very much. I drink (too much) red wine, and have been known to drink more than a bottle on a night :shock: without any ill effects - at least, not from the Metformin :lol:
    Having said that, some people on Metformin find they feel sick if they drink; some others get blinding headaches; so it's not something to dismiss altogether. Keep an eye on things.
    There are two other problems with alcohol; one is the calories, but you say your husband is thin; the other is the carbohydrate content - carbohydrate turns into glucose and raises blood glucose levels.
    Which beer does your husband drink? It's worth checking both the alcohol and the carbohydrate content and seeing if you can find a lower alcohol, lower carbohydrate beer that he likes. But I do agree with you - don't nag. Men :roll: !
    About his diabetes: he is a little young for a typical Type 2, but it is occuring in younger people these days; and you don't have to be fat - even skinnies can get it, though admittedly not many. Do you have a blood glucose testing kit, with a monitor and test strips? Some surgeries give them out to all diabetics; in other practices, they won't give them to Type 2s. We do need them, at least at first, to help us find out which foods spike us and which foods we can eat safely. It may be that your husband is not a typical Type 2 - there are different varieties. Monitoring his blood glucose regularly, and keeping a diary of the results, will help you both see what's going on. If need be, go back to the doctor.
    Have you had the "info for Newbies" that Daisy1 posts for all new members? You'll find it helpful, particularly if you do most of the cooking. Most of us on here find that we have to control our carbohydrate intake in order to keep control of our blood glucose levels. If I ate the diet the NHS dietitian recommended, my blood glucose levels would be through the roof. By limiting my carbs and eating more meat, fish and veg, I can keep my levels within the non-diabetic range - and it's no hardship!
    Don't be surprised if you find your husband is in denial. It happens to very many of us on first being diagnosed, and in my experience the more fit and healthy the newbie is, the more likely they are to deny their diabetes! It's not the end of the world - look at Sir Steve Redgrave! or Sir Ranulph Fiennes. It doesn't stop us doing anything; but we have to be aware of our condition and work with it, not against it.
    The time after first being diagnosed is worrying; you're both still finding your feet with this, and there's at lot of information to take in. You're among friends here; have a good read around, and ask anything you like - no such thing as a silly question! We'll help all we can, so do come back and tell us how you're getting on. Slow and steady is the way - he's not going to drop dead just yet! and there's no reason you can't both live full and active lives from here on.
    Do come back and give us an update - and get that testing kit!
    Viv 8)

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

Related Articles

Popular Articles

More in diabetes