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What Are The Symptoms When Your Blood Sugar Is Too High?

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What Is High Blood Sugar?

Have you ever tried to fly a remote control airplane or helicopter? If you steer too sharply one way, your plane will crash into the ground. And if you go too far in the opposite direction, the plane will nose directly upward, making it difficult to control. For people with diabetes, controlling blood sugar levels (or blood glucose levels) is kind of like piloting that plane. To stay in the air and have the most fun, you have to keep blood sugar levels steady. Having a blood sugar level that's too high can make you feel lousy, and having it often can be unhealthy. The blood glucose level is the amount of glucose in the blood. Glucose is a sugar that comes from the foods we eat, and it's also formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the cells of our body, and it's carried to each cell through the bloodstream. Hyperglycemia (pronounced: hi-per-gly-SEE-me-uh) is the medical word for high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels happen when the body either can't make insulin (type 1 diabetes) or can't respond to insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). The body needs insulin so glucose in the blood can enter the cells of the body where it can be used for ener Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. CA92804

    When can you get 'high blood sugar' symptoms?

    Can you have "high blood sugar" symptoms at 140, or even 120? Is there a usual number when one might start having symptoms?
    I am wondering because I get nauseated and headaches often. I was recently diagnosed with diabetes, with an A1c of 6.3. It does not seem like my diabetes is "bad" ('mean plasma glucose' was 147 I think) but I guess it could get that way if I am not careful. Anyway, I have tested when I was nauseated or had a headache, but my sugar was either in the low 100's (110 -120ish I think) or 146 at another time. Could I have hyperglycemia symptoms with blood sugar that's 'not that high'.
    I guess I think of high blood sugar as rising over 200, or in the 200's and not coming down. Am I mistaken?

  2. PG4003

    I can only tell you my own experience. I'm like you, I don't think my diabetes is that "bad", my last A1C was 6.3 and my home testing numbers are usually between 100-120, sometimes a little lower. And I'm not real sure what you mean by "symptoms", the nausea and headache? I can tell you that if I eat too many bad carbs, I do feel bad, I have the nausea and a general overall feeling of what I call "yucky". But as long as my numbers are around 100-120, I don't have any symptoms. I have to get up to at least 160 or higher before I have any symptoms. It doesn't seem like you should be getting these symptoms from 100-120 bg levels. But if there's one thing I've learned, every diabetic body is different. How long have you been taking your Metformin? That should help bring your numbers down. Watch your carbs closely. Keep a food journal, everytime you eat something different, test before and after. You'll soon see which foods are safe for you. Good luck and visit us often!

  3. kraftypixie

    High BGs are a matter of opinion. My meter's logbook lists the American College of Endocrinology's goals as being 110 or lower before meals & 140 or lower 2hrs after a meal. There is a big difference between 100 & 146. Over 200 is what I consider VERY high.
    I think how you feel when you go very high is different for us all, as is what is a 'high' number. I think this has alot to do with what we are used to eating & how we are used to feeling. I was feeling sick on a regular basis before I found out I had T2, but did not connect it to what I ate, as I could eat a different meal & feel just as bad (I think the connection was high carbs). After just 1 week of cutting carbs I went to IHOP & had pancakes with my meal & came home & felt very, very tired & nauseous & my BG was around 250- lightbulb moment.

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