diabetestalk.net

Blood Sugar After Eating 2 Hours

Share on facebook

Type 2 Diabetes

Related Media: The Importance of Healthy Eating When You Have Diabetes Definition Glucose is a type of sugar. It comes from food, and is also created in the liver. Glucose travels through the body in the blood. It moves from the blood to cells with the help of a hormone called insulin. Once glucose is in those cells, it can be used for energy. Insulin also helps glucose to move into the liver for storage if there is too much to use. Diabetes is a condition that makes it difficult for the body to use or store glucose. This causes a buildup of glucose in the blood. It also means the body is not getting enough energy. Type 2 diabetes is one type of diabetes. It is the most common type in adults. Medication, lifestyle changes, and monitoring can help control blood glucose levels. Causes Type 2 diabetes is often caused by a combination of factors. The initial factor is that the body becomes resistant to insulin. This means there is insulin in the body, but the body cannot use it effectively. Insulin resistance is often related to excess body fat. A second factor is that the body begins to make less insulin. Risk Factors Type 2 diabetes is more common in people who are aged 45 years and Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. micksmixxx

    Hi rebecca21265,
    You should test two hours after your first taste of your meal, ma'am.
    Having said that, foods such as pizza and burger have a high fat content, so testing two hours after you've finished wouldn't be so very different than if you were to test two hours after your first bite. (A normal functioning pancreas would give a second or even third 'burst' of insulin to deal with glucose levels that remain high.)
    There IS a POSSIBILITY that you could still have Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT), which simply means that your pancreas doesn't produce insulin efficiently to deal with a sudden influx of glucose. (We get glucose from the breakdown of carbohydrates during the digestive process.)
    In someone that doesn't have a glucose metabolism 'problem' ... someone with pre-diabetes/diabetes or hypoglycaemia [hypoglycemia, if you prefer the American spelling], which is lower than 'normal' blood glucose levels, you wouldn't expect to see a two hours post prandial (after eating) blood glucose level to be more than 7.8 mmol/l [140 mg/dL if you are American]. I say normally as there are occasions when blood glucose levels could rise higher, such as if you were suffering with some sort of infection, you were taking certain types of medication(s) which are known to raise blood glucose levels, or if you had a medical condition which could raise blood glucose levels.
    If you do test and find that your two hours post prandial blood glucose level is higher than the figure quoted you need to see your doctor and explain what you've done and the result obtained.
    Your doctor MAY well ask you to test a few more times, just to make sure it wasn't a 'one off', but MAY request you to undergo a Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT) ... sometimes also referred to as an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test.
    For this test you would be requested to fast (not eat or drink overnight), then have a fasting blood glucose test carried out. You would be requested to drink a sickly sweet substance, called glucola, then have blood drawn at hourly intervals. (It depends on your doctor how many hours this test would be for.)
    A comparison of the fasting blood glucose test result and the later, hourly, blood test results would indicate whether your pancreas is working sufficiently well or whether you do, in fact, have impaired glucose tolerance.
    I wish you well, ma'am.
    Lots of Love and Light.
    Mick
    x x x x
    x x x
    P.S. Please don't be offended, or alarmed, at the 'x's'. It's merely a logo, of sorts, that I've used for some 30-odd years now.
    Report this ❤ 1 Reply to micksmixxx

  2. micksmixxx

    Hi rebecca21265,
    Thank you for coming back with more information, ma'am.
    Your post prandial blood test result of 7.1 mmol/l does look OK.
    Can I ask you what makes you believe that you might be pre-diabetic? You haven't indicated what might be causing you to believe that you're at risk.
    There are several things you doctor would be looking for, such as your size and shape of body (people who carry a lot of adipose (abdominal) fat are more likely to develop insulin resistance, which is a precursor to the development of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes); whether you have a family history of diabetes, your ethnicity (African Caribbeans and Asians do have a higher proportion of people who MAY develop type 2 diabetes); how active you are; whether you have other medical conditions; what, if any, medications you are taking; whether you abuse alcohol or certain medications/drugs, etc.
    Lots of Love and Light.
    Mick
    x x x x
    x x x
    Report this ❤ 0 Reply to micksmixxx


    ★2 rebecca21265 micksmixxx 2 years ago
    I'm Asian plus I had gestational diabetes 3 months ago. Also my parents and all 4 grandparents have t2 diabetes. So I fear I may have developed diabetes. So I just want to be accurate at testing my BG. I'm not sure if I'm supposed to test 2 hours after last bite of the meal? Or 2 hours after first bite of food?
    Thanks
    Report this ❤ 0 Reply to rebecca21265

  3. micksmixxx

    Dear rebecca21265,
    Thank you, ma'am, for adding more information.
    To be honest with you I'm not sure why your doctor is saying that you "don't need to check my glucose levels at all." Having developed gestational diabetes yourself DOES put you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes yourself at some point in your life. Having close family members that have type 2 diabetes DOES put you at increased risk of developing it yourself at some point in your life. Being Asian DOES put you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes yourself at some point in your life.
    The recommendation for testing your post prandial blood glucose level is two hours from the first bite that you eat. It takes roughly one and a half to two hours for your digestive system to break down the foods that you eat and for the glucose to be absorbed through the walls of the intestines into your bloodstream, hence the advice to test two hours after eating. You'd have PROBABLY been advised, during your pregnancy to test at one hour after eating and MAYBE two hours after eating as well. That is the 'normal' recommendation.
    Is there another doctor in the practice/surgery that you attend that you could possibly see? It seems that the doctor you are currently seeing isn't so au fait (familiar) wiith risk factors for the development of diabetes.
    I certainly do hope that you can get someone to listen to you, ma'am, as there IS a possibility that you COULD go on to develop type 2 diabetes. I'm really surprised that this wasn't explained to you when you developed gestational diabetes. Normally, gestational diabetes does 'disappear' after the birth of your child, but it DOES still leave you at risk of developing type 2 at some point in your life.
    Lots of Love and Light.
    Mick
    x x x x
    x x x
    Report this ❤ 0 Reply to micksmixxx

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

Related Articles

Popular Articles

More in blood sugar