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Blood Sugar 87 Before Eating

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The Normal A1c Level

Wow Richard, 70 lbs? I have lost 24 lbs from low carb diet due to SIBO. It also helped my AC1 go down three points from 6.2 and my cholesterol is lower, which surprised me. I can’t afford to lose anymore weight because I was small to begin with. I had noticed much bigger people in the UK over the last 5 years compared to 15-20. Was quite shocking. I thought we had the patent on obesity! I am not diabetic that I know of but I had weird symptoms… Thirst that continued all day and night. My husband called me a camel. Dry eyes, rashes, strange dark discolouration on arm, under the arm to the side, some circulation issues and blurred vision. Eye specialist could not figure out why. Sores in the mouth also. I had observed about three weeks into super low carbs (30 Gms carb/day) that athlete’s foot symptom, sores in mouth and rashes were clearing up. So, lowering carbs for SIBO actually turned out for the best. By the way, I love your final paragraph. Research is what led me to SIBO diagnosis, and I then told the GI what to look for! He was barking up the wrong tree for months. Said I needed to eat more carbs so I don’t lose weight. Well, carbs fed the bacterial overgrowth!!! Dang Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. snusnuMV

    A question about blood sugar in non-diabetics

    For a while now I've been thinking about non-diabetic blood sugar. On numerous websites, I've read that anything up to 140 mg/dL is normal after a meal.
    On Jenny's website, there's a graph on the "What is Normal Blood Sugar?" page. There's the blue line, which is the average for the group, and the two brown lines above and below that are the standard deviations. The blue line would seem to indicate that blood sugar exceeding the 120s after eating is abnormal. I tend to believe this is closer to what's normal.
    Here's my problem. I have tested non-diabetic friends and family members on my meter. Some of them volunteered; some of them I asked to test. One of my friends had a huge brownie and two cookies, as well as a pint of whole milk, and his blood sugar was 102 at 45 minutes and 87 at 90 minutes. I have tested others, too, and I almost never see a reading over 100 at any point after eating: 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, etc. Another one of my friends had 4 slices of deep dish pizza and her 1-hour reading was 73. (Yeah, I was jealous.)
    So, I'm looking at the graph and the lower standard deviation is closer to what I'm seeing among the handful of people I've tested, yet there's a wide range of what's considered "normal." I admit that my sample size is small.
    Is blood sugar like any other type of blood test where there's an acceptable range based on human variation or are you more likely to develop diabetes if you fall on the higher end of that range? In other words, if you spike to 122 mg/dL after eating lunch, are you perfectly healthy or is that some very early warning sign that your pancreas is having a little trouble responding to rising blood sugar?

  2. jwags

    I think everyone is different depending how well their endocrine system and Phase 1 Insulin Response. I tested my son an hour after a carby dinner and he was 102, his wife was 118 and she ate a salad without the steak. From what I understand within minutes of beginning a meal your stored insulin kicks in to start pushing glucose into cells. This is why "normal" people rarely see a high spike. Those who do may be trending towards pre diabetes. Personally I don't like my bgs to go over 120.

  3. Nicoletti

    Originally Posted by snusnuMV
    Here's my problem. I have tested non-diabetic friends and family members on my meter. Some of them volunteered; some of them I asked to test. One of my friends had a huge brownie and two cookies, as well as a pint of whole milk, and his blood sugar was 102 at 45 minutes and 87 at 90 minutes. I have tested others, too, and I almost never see a reading over 100 at any point after eating: 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, etc. Another one of my friends had 4 slices of deep dish pizza and her 1-hour reading was 73. (Yeah, I was jealous.)
    Is blood sugar like any other type of blood test where there's an acceptable range based on human variation or are you more likely to develop diabetes if you fall on the higher end of that range? In other words, if you spike to 122 mg/dL after eating lunch, are you perfectly healthy or is that some very early warning sign that your pancreas is having a little trouble responding to rising blood sugar? I would think what blood sugar was before eating would also contribute to the pp reading. And morning meals, even non diabetics are most insulin resistant in the morning.
    For type 2s I'd be more concerned about IR than pancreas not producing enough, as that's usually how it goes for type 2s.

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